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CentOS. Need to find files modified in last 30 days to see if any of them have been infected with malware.

I tried this:

root@server [/home/someuser/public_html/]# find . -mtime +30
 -exec ls -l {} > last30days.txt \;

But instead of the last 30 days, it seems to have found everything. 22,000 files.

88

A couple of issues

  • You're not limiting it to files, so when it finds a matching directory it will list every file within it.
  • You can't use > in -exec without something like bash -c '... > ...'. Though the > will overwrite the file, so you want to redirect the entire find anyway rather than each -exec.
  • +30 is older than 30 days, -30 would be modified in last 30 days.
  • -exec really isn't needed, you could list everything with various -printf options.

Something like below should work

find . -type f -mtime -30 -exec ls -l {} \; > last30days.txt

Example with -printf

find . -type f -mtime -30 -printf "%M %u %g %TR %TD %p\n" > last30days.txt

This will list files in format "permissions owner group time date filename". -printf is generally preferable to -exec in cases where you don't have to do anything complicated. This is because it will run faster as a result of not having to execute subshells for each -exec. Depending on the version of find, you may also be able to use -ls, which has a similar format to above.

  • I just want to create a file that, hopefully, I could look through in vim or in Excel and see if any of the recently modified files are unusual. We normally only modify certain files. If there are additional files, that could tell us the source of the malicious code. I copied the exec version from somewhere on the internet. Could you add a printf example and explain why it is better? I suppose it has more formatting options, yes? – Buttle Butkus Apr 14 '14 at 22:07
  • 2
    @ButtleButkus Added -printf example. – BroSlow Apr 14 '14 at 22:20
  • Thanks, that worked quite well! – Buttle Butkus Apr 14 '14 at 22:55
  • if you add a . just after the find, as in find . -type f -mtime -30 -exec ls -l {} \; it will do the search in the current directory – Kolob Canyon Nov 26 '16 at 15:34

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