99

I'm consuming an API from my android app, and all the JSON responses are like this:

{
    'status': 'OK',
    'reason': 'Everything was fine',
    'content': {
         < some data here >
}

The problem is that all my POJOs have a status, reason fields, and inside the content field is the real POJO I want.

Is there any way to create a custom converter of Gson to extract always the content field, so retrofit returns the appropiate POJO?

  • sites.google.com/site/gson/… – Brian Roach Apr 14 '14 at 21:03
  • I read the document but I don't see how to do it... :( I don't realise how to program the code to solve my problem – mikelar Apr 14 '14 at 21:37
  • I'm curious why you wouldn't just format your POJO class to handle those status results. – jj. Mar 18 '16 at 21:09

11 Answers 11

153

You would write a custom deserializer that returns the embedded object.

Let's say your JSON is:

{
    "status":"OK",
    "reason":"some reason",
    "content" : 
    {
        "foo": 123,
        "bar": "some value"
    }
}

You'd then have a Content POJO:

class Content
{
    public int foo;
    public String bar;
}

Then you write a deserializer:

class MyDeserializer implements JsonDeserializer<Content>
{
    @Override
    public Content deserialize(JsonElement je, Type type, JsonDeserializationContext jdc)
        throws JsonParseException
    {
        // Get the "content" element from the parsed JSON
        JsonElement content = je.getAsJsonObject().get("content");

        // Deserialize it. You use a new instance of Gson to avoid infinite recursion
        // to this deserializer
        return new Gson().fromJson(content, Content.class);

    }
}

Now if you construct a Gson with GsonBuilder and register the deserializer:

Gson gson = 
    new GsonBuilder()
        .registerTypeAdapter(Content.class, new MyDeserializer())
        .create();

You can deserialize your JSON straight to your Content:

Content c = gson.fromJson(myJson, Content.class);

Edit to add from comments:

If you have different types of messages but they all have the "content" field, you can make the Deserializer generic by doing:

class MyDeserializer<T> implements JsonDeserializer<T>
{
    @Override
    public T deserialize(JsonElement je, Type type, JsonDeserializationContext jdc)
        throws JsonParseException
    {
        // Get the "content" element from the parsed JSON
        JsonElement content = je.getAsJsonObject().get("content");

        // Deserialize it. You use a new instance of Gson to avoid infinite recursion
        // to this deserializer
        return new Gson().fromJson(content, type);

    }
}

You just have to register an instance for each of your types:

Gson gson = 
    new GsonBuilder()
        .registerTypeAdapter(Content.class, new MyDeserializer<Content>())
        .registerTypeAdapter(DiffContent.class, new MyDeserializer<DiffContent>())
        .create();

When you call .fromJson() the type is carried into the deserializer, so it should then work for all your types.

And finally when creating a Retrofit instance:

Retrofit retrofit = new Retrofit.Builder()
                .baseUrl(url)
                .addConverterFactory(GsonConverterFactory.create(gson))
                .build();
  • 1
    wow, that's great! thanks! :D Is there any way to generalise the solution so I don't have to create one JsonDeserializer per each type of response? – mikelar Apr 14 '14 at 22:00
  • 1
    This is amazing! One thing to change: Gson gson = new GsonBuilder().create(); Instead of Gson gson = new GsonBuilder().build(); There are two instances of this. – Nelson Osacky Apr 24 '14 at 4:57
  • 7
    @feresr you can call setConverter(new GsonConverter(gson)) in Retrofit's RestAdapter.Builder class – akhyar Jun 4 '14 at 10:27
  • 2
    @BrianRoach thanks, nice answer.. should I register Person.class and List<Person>.class/Person[].class with separated Deserializer? – akhyar Jun 4 '14 at 10:28
  • 1
    Any possibility to get the "status" and "reason" too? For example if all the requests return them, can we have them in a super class and use subclasses which are the actual POJOs from "content"? – ItsNotAboutTheName Sep 27 '14 at 10:34
15

@BrianRoach's solution is the correct solution. It is worth noting that in the special case where you have nested custom objects that both need a custom TypeAdapter, you must register the TypeAdapter with the new instance of GSON, otherwise the second TypeAdapter will never be called. This is because we are creating a new Gson instance inside our custom deserializer.

For example, if you had the following json:

{
    "status": "OK",
    "reason": "some reason",
    "content": {
        "foo": 123,
        "bar": "some value",
        "subcontent": {
            "useless": "field",
            "data": {
                "baz": "values"
            }
        }
    }
}

And you wanted this JSON to be mapped to the following objects:

class MainContent
{
    public int foo;
    public String bar;
    public SubContent subcontent;
}

class SubContent
{
    public String baz;
}

You would need to register the SubContent's TypeAdapter. To be more robust, you could do the following:

public class MyDeserializer<T> implements JsonDeserializer<T> {
    private final Class mNestedClazz;
    private final Object mNestedDeserializer;

    public MyDeserializer(Class nestedClazz, Object nestedDeserializer) {
        mNestedClazz = nestedClazz;
        mNestedDeserializer = nestedDeserializer;
    }

    @Override
    public T deserialize(JsonElement je, Type type, JsonDeserializationContext jdc) throws JsonParseException {
        // Get the "content" element from the parsed JSON
        JsonElement content = je.getAsJsonObject().get("content");

        // Deserialize it. You use a new instance of Gson to avoid infinite recursion
        // to this deserializer
        GsonBuilder builder = new GsonBuilder();
        if (mNestedClazz != null && mNestedDeserializer != null) {
            builder.registerTypeAdapter(mNestedClazz, mNestedDeserializer);
        }
        return builder.create().fromJson(content, type);

    }
}

and then create it like so:

MyDeserializer<Content> myDeserializer = new MyDeserializer<Content>(SubContent.class,
                    new SubContentDeserializer());
Gson gson = new GsonBuilder().registerTypeAdapter(Content.class, myDeserializer).create();

This could easily be used for the nested "content" case as well by simply passing in a new instance of MyDeserializer with null values.

  • 1
    What package is "Type" from? There are a million packages containing the class "Type". Thank you. – Kyle Bridenstine Jun 9 '15 at 1:55
  • 2
    @Mr.Tea It'll be java.lang.reflect.Type – aidan Jun 15 '15 at 13:07
  • Where is the SubContentDeserializer class? @KMarlow – LogronJ Dec 13 '18 at 9:55
9

Bit late but hopefully this will help someone.

Just create following TypeAdapterFactory.

    public class ItemTypeAdapterFactory implements TypeAdapterFactory {

      public <T> TypeAdapter<T> create(Gson gson, final TypeToken<T> type) {

        final TypeAdapter<T> delegate = gson.getDelegateAdapter(this, type);
        final TypeAdapter<JsonElement> elementAdapter = gson.getAdapter(JsonElement.class);

        return new TypeAdapter<T>() {

            public void write(JsonWriter out, T value) throws IOException {
                delegate.write(out, value);
            }

            public T read(JsonReader in) throws IOException {

                JsonElement jsonElement = elementAdapter.read(in);
                if (jsonElement.isJsonObject()) {
                    JsonObject jsonObject = jsonElement.getAsJsonObject();
                    if (jsonObject.has("content")) {
                        jsonElement = jsonObject.get("content");
                    }
                }

                return delegate.fromJsonTree(jsonElement);
            }
        }.nullSafe();
    }
}

and add it into your GSON builder :

.registerTypeAdapterFactory(new ItemTypeAdapterFactory());

or

 yourGsonBuilder.registerTypeAdapterFactory(new ItemTypeAdapterFactory());
  • This is exactly what I look. Because I have a lot of types wrapped with "data" node and I can't add TypeAdapter to each of them. Thanks! – Sergey Irisov Jun 26 '17 at 12:50
  • @SergeyIrisov you are welcome. You can up vote this answer so it get higher :) – Matin Petrulak Jun 26 '17 at 15:56
  • How to pass multiple jsonElement ?. like i have content , content1, etc. – Sathish Kumar J Dec 13 '17 at 2:04
  • I think your back-end devs should change the structure and do not pass content, content1... What is the advantage of this approach? – Matin Petrulak Dec 13 '17 at 10:37
7

Continuing Brian's idea, because we almost always have many REST resources each with it's own root, it could be useful to generalize deserialization:

 class RestDeserializer<T> implements JsonDeserializer<T> {

    private Class<T> mClass;
    private String mKey;

    public RestDeserializer(Class<T> targetClass, String key) {
        mClass = targetClass;
        mKey = key;
    }

    @Override
    public T deserialize(JsonElement je, Type type, JsonDeserializationContext jdc)
            throws JsonParseException {
        JsonElement content = je.getAsJsonObject().get(mKey);
        return new Gson().fromJson(content, mClass);

    }
}

Then to parse sample payload from above, we can register GSON deserializer:

Gson gson = new GsonBuilder()
    .registerTypeAdapter(Content.class, new RestDeserializer<>(Content.class, "content"))
    .build();
6

Had the same problem couple of days ago. I've solve this using response wrapper class and RxJava transformer, which I think is quite flexiable solution:

Wrapper:

public class ApiResponse<T> {
    public String status;
    public String reason;
    public T content;
}

Custom exception to throw, when status is not OK:

public class ApiException extends RuntimeException {
    private final String reason;

    public ApiException(String reason) {
        this.reason = reason;
    }

    public String getReason() {
        return apiError;
    }
}

Rx transformer:

protected <T> Observable.Transformer<ApiResponse<T>, T> applySchedulersAndExtractData() {
    return observable -> observable
            .subscribeOn(Schedulers.io())
            .observeOn(AndroidSchedulers.mainThread())
            .map(tApiResponse -> {
                if (!tApiResponse.status.equals("OK"))
                    throw new ApiException(tApiResponse.reason);
                else
                    return tApiResponse.content;
            });
}

Example usage:

// Call definition:
@GET("/api/getMyPojo")
Observable<ApiResponse<MyPojo>> getConfig();

// Call invoke:
webservice.getMyPojo()
        .compose(applySchedulersAndExtractData())
        .subscribe(this::handleSuccess, this::handleError);


private void handleSuccess(MyPojo mypojo) {
    // handle success
}

private void handleError(Throwable t) {
    getView().showSnackbar( ((ApiException) throwable).getReason() );
}

My topic: Retrofit 2 RxJava - Gson - "Global" deserialization, change response type

  • What does MyPojo look like? – IgorGanapolsky Jan 12 '16 at 19:33
  • 1
    @IgorGanapolsky MyPojo can look however you want. It should match your content data retrieved from a server. Structure of this class should be adjusted to your serialization converter (Gson, Jackson etc.). – rafakob Jan 13 '16 at 7:08
3

A better solution could be this..

public class ApiResponse<T> {
    public T data;
    public String status;
    public String reason;
}

Then, define your service like this..

Observable<ApiResponse<YourClass>> updateDevice(..);
3

As per answer of @Brian Roach and @rafakob i done this in the following way

Json response from server

{
  "status": true,
  "code": 200,
  "message": "Success",
  "data": {
    "fullname": "Rohan",
    "role": 1
  }
}

Common data handler class

public class ApiResponse<T> {
    @SerializedName("status")
    public boolean status;

    @SerializedName("code")
    public int code;

    @SerializedName("message")
    public String reason;

    @SerializedName("data")
    public T content;
}

Custom serializer

static class MyDeserializer<T> implements JsonDeserializer<T>
{
     @Override
      public T deserialize(JsonElement je, Type type, JsonDeserializationContext jdc)
                    throws JsonParseException
      {
          JsonElement content = je.getAsJsonObject();

          // Deserialize it. You use a new instance of Gson to avoid infinite recursion
          // to this deserializer
          return new Gson().fromJson(content, type);

      }
}

Gson object

Gson gson = new GsonBuilder()
                    .registerTypeAdapter(ApiResponse.class, new MyDeserializer<ApiResponse>())
                    .create();

Api call

 @FormUrlEncoded
 @POST("/loginUser")
 Observable<ApiResponse<Profile>> signIn(@Field("email") String username, @Field("password") String password);

restService.signIn(username, password)
                .observeOn(AndroidSchedulers.mainThread())
                .subscribeOn(Schedulers.io())
                .subscribe(new Observer<ApiResponse<Profile>>() {
                    @Override
                    public void onCompleted() {
                        Log.i("login", "On complete");
                    }

                    @Override
                    public void onError(Throwable e) {
                        Log.i("login", e.toString());
                    }

                    @Override
                    public void onNext(ApiResponse<Profile> response) {
                         Profile profile= response.content;
                         Log.i("login", profile.getFullname());
                    }
                });
2

This is the same solution as @AYarulin but assume the class name is the JSON key name. This way you only need to pass the Class name.

 class RestDeserializer<T> implements JsonDeserializer<T> {

    private Class<T> mClass;
    private String mKey;

    public RestDeserializer(Class<T> targetClass) {
        mClass = targetClass;
        mKey = mClass.getSimpleName();
    }

    @Override
    public T deserialize(JsonElement je, Type type, JsonDeserializationContext jdc)
            throws JsonParseException {
        JsonElement content = je.getAsJsonObject().get(mKey);
        return new Gson().fromJson(content, mClass);

    }
}

Then to parse sample payload from above, we can register GSON deserializer. This is problematic as the Key is case sensitive, so the case of the class name must match the case of the JSON key.

Gson gson = new GsonBuilder()
.registerTypeAdapter(Content.class, new RestDeserializer<>(Content.class))
.build();
2

Here's a Kotlin version based on the answers by Brian Roach and AYarulin.

class RestDeserializer<T>(targetClass: Class<T>, key: String?) : JsonDeserializer<T> {
    val targetClass = targetClass
    val key = key

    override fun deserialize(json: JsonElement?, typeOfT: Type?, context: JsonDeserializationContext?): T {
        val data = json!!.asJsonObject.get(key ?: "")

        return Gson().fromJson(data, targetClass)
    }
}
1

In my case, the "content" key would change for each response. Example:

// Root is hotel
{
  status : "ok",
  statusCode : 200,
  hotels : [{
    name : "Taj Palace",
    location : {
      lat : 12
      lng : 77
    }

  }, {
    name : "Plaza", 
    location : {
      lat : 12
      lng : 77
    }
  }]
}

//Root is city

{
  status : "ok",
  statusCode : 200,
  city : {
    name : "Vegas",
    location : {
      lat : 12
      lng : 77
    }
}

In such cases I used a similar solution as listed above but had to tweak it. You can see the gist here. It's a little too large to post it here on SOF.

The annotation @InnerKey("content") is used and the rest of the code is to facilitate it's usage with Gson.

0

Don't forget @SerializedName and @Expose annotations for all Class members and Inner Class members that most deserialized from JSON by GSON.

Look at https://stackoverflow.com/a/40239512/1676736

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