38

I have a "SuperClass" with "info" as an instance variable. "SuperClass" has function "printInfo()". "printInfo()" needs to access instance variable "info". I want to create a "SubClass" which also has method "printInfo()". I want to call printInfo() of "SuperClass" from "printInfo()" of "SubClass".

SuperClass = function()
{
    this.info = "I am superclass";
    console.log("SuperClass:");
};

SuperClass.prototype.printInfo = function(that)
{
    console.log("printing from superclass printInfo");
    console.log(that.info);
};

SubClass = function(){};

SubClass.prototype = new SuperClass();

SubClass.prototype.printInfo = function()
{
    console.log("calling superclass");
    this.constructor.prototype.printInfo(this);
    console.log("called superclass");
};

var sc = new SubClass();
sc.printInfo();

You can see that I am passing "that" as a parameter to printInfo. Without "that" parameter, "info" is printed as "undefined". Like in the following case, "this.info" is undefined when this function is called from object of "SubClass".

SuperClass.prototype.printInfo = function()
    {
        console.log("printing from superclass printInfo");
        console.log(this.info);
    };

What is the proper way to override and invoke methods of superclass in javascript, enabling functions to access instance variables of the class?

2

7 Answers 7

30

You are messing with the SubClass's prototype with the SuperClass's object, in this line

SubClass.prototype = new SuperClass();

the child's prototype should depend on the Parent's prototype. So, you can inherit like this

SubClass.prototype = Object.create(SuperClass.prototype);

Also, it is quite normal to change the constructor to the actual function, like this

SubClass.prototype.constructor = SubClass;

To keep your implementation generic, you can use Object.getPrototypeOf, to get the parent prototype in the inheritance chain and then invoke printInfo, like this

SubClass.prototype.printInfo = function() {
    Object.getPrototypeOf(SubClass.prototype).printInfo(this);
};

Since, info is defined in the SubClass yet, it will print undefined. You might also want to call the parent't constructor, like this

var SubClass = function() {
    SuperClass.call(this);
};

Note: You are creating global variables, by omitting var keyword before SuperClass and SubClass.

4
  • 1
    To keep it generic, I called super constructor with Object.getPrototypeOf(Subclass.prototype).constructor.call(this). That is same way you invoke the super class function. Although I am not sure if this is the correct way, I am no expert on how js works. Commented Feb 27, 2015 at 18:02
  • 2
    Wouldn't the call from Subclass.printInfo() to Superclass.printInfo() be Object.getPrototypeOf(SubClass.prototype).printInfo.call(this) rather than just ...printInfo(this)? I ask because I tried it your way and got an error about undefined. I'm not a JS expert, so it's not clear to me why either way would work or not work. Commented Nov 15, 2016 at 13:58
  • @thefourtheye If you wanna be really clean you could say Object.getPrototypeOf(Object.getPrototypeOf(this)). Commented Jul 15, 2018 at 14:17
  • @GreatBigBore Correct. You need .call(this) so that this inside the called method will be the same as inside the calling method. Commented Jul 15, 2018 at 14:18
13
class Thing {
  constructor(age) { this.age = age; }
  die(how) { console.log(`Died of ${how}`); }
}

class Me extends Thing {
  constructor() { super(59); console.log(`I am ${this.age}`); }
  // Refer to a method from the superclass that is overridden in the subclass
  die(how) { super.die('liver failure'); console.log(`while ${how}`) }
}

(new Me()).die('hang gliding');
2
  • 1
    That's exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! Commented Apr 11, 2020 at 18:57
  • 1
    This should be the accepted answer. Simple and uses the new class syntax
    – yuyu5
    Commented Mar 5, 2021 at 23:18
10

After reading all the answers, I am using the following inheritance mechanism:

var SuperClass = function()
{
    this.info = "I am superclass";
    console.log("SuperClass:");
};

SuperClass.prototype.printInfo = function()
{
    console.log("printing from superclass printInfo");
    console.log("printinfo");
    console.log(this.info);
};

var SubClass = function(){
    SuperClass.call(this);
};

SubClass.prototype = Object.create(SuperClass.prototype);
SubClass.prototype.constructor = SubClass;

SubClass.prototype.printInfo = function()
{
    console.log("calling superclass");
    Object.getPrototypeOf(SubClass.prototype).printInfo.call(this);
    console.log("called superclass");
};

var sc = new SubClass();
sc.printInfo();
1
  • 1
    You need to set the constructor too, SubClass.prototype.constructor = SubClass Commented Dec 27, 2015 at 12:08
7

You can write it like this :

SuperClass.prototype.printInfo = function(){
  console.log("printing from superclass printInfo");
  console.log(this.info); 
};

SubClass.prototype.printInfo = function(){
  console.log("calling superclass");
  SuperClass.prototype.printInfo.call(this);
  console.log("called superclass");
};
0
5

For anybody who comes more from a Java world I would ignore all of the above and use the following syntax instead that was introduced in 2015

class Polygon {
  constructor(height, width) {
    this.height = height;
    this.width = width;
  }
}

class Square extends Polygon {
  constructor(sideLength) {
    super(sideLength, sideLength);
  }
  get area() {
    return this.height * this.width;
  }
  set sideLength(newLength) {
    this.height = newLength;
    this.width = newLength;
  }
} 

More info on https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Inheritance_and_the_prototype_chain

And suddently u can use super as keyword to access ancester etc.... For me finding this was a big relief

3
  • Just what I was looking for. Commented Jun 25, 2018 at 17:04
  • Unfortunately, super can only be used in the constructor.
    – Offirmo
    Commented Oct 8, 2018 at 6:28
  • 2
    Fortunately, @Offirmo is wrong. :-) See my answer below.
    – Denis Howe
    Commented Aug 4, 2019 at 9:41
2

@coolscitist

Instead of

SubClass.prototype.printInfo = function()
{
    Object.getPrototypeOf(SubClass.prototype).printInfo.call(this);
};

use this

SubClass.prototype.printInfo = function()
{
    Object.getPrototypeOf(this.constructor.prototype).printInfo.call(this);
};
2
  • 1
    Thanks. Only your solution worked for me. The other answers called the superclass method ok, but got undefined 'this' error.
    – yoshi
    Commented Feb 24, 2016 at 2:54
  • 3
    No, this is not ok. Let say a new class Class3 inherit from SubClass, calling Class3's printInfo() will cause infinite loop. This is because the this.constructor above will always give Class3 instead of SubClass, i.e. calling printInfo function of Class3's superclass (SubClass) again & again. Commented Jun 13, 2016 at 6:53
0

The only way I've been able to sort this out is to save the parent's function in different variable before overriding in the child class definition.

var Foo = function(){
    var self = this.
    this.init = function(a,b){
        self.a = a;
        seld.b = b;
    };
}

var Goo = function(){
    Foo.apply(this);
    var self = this;
    self.Foo = { init: self.init };//saves the super class's definition of init in a new variable
    self.init = function(a,b,c){
       self.Foo.init(a,b);//can call the super class function
       self.c = c;
    };
}

var a = new Foo();
a.init(1,2);
var b = new Goo();
b.init(1,2,3);

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.