80

This question already has an answer here:

I have the following script which returns the next day:

function today(i)
    {
        var today = new Date();
        var dd = today.getDate()+1;
        var mm = today.getMonth()+1;
        var yyyy = today.getFullYear();

        today = dd+'/'+mm+'/'+yyyy;

        return today;   
    }

By using this:

today.getDate()+1;

I am getting the next day of the month (for example today would get 16).

My problem is that this could be on the last day of the month, and therefore end up returning 32/4/2014

Is there a way I can get the guaranteed correct date for the next day?

marked as duplicate by Bergi, Sahil Mahajan Mj, Oscar, hutchonoid, sjngm Apr 15 '14 at 11:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

124

You can use:

var today = new Date();
var tomorrow = new Date();
tomorrow.setDate(today.getDate()+1);

For example, since there are 30 days in April, the following code will output May 1:

var day = new Date('Apr 30, 2000');
console.log(day); // Apr 30 2000

var nextDay = new Date(day);
nextDay.setDate(day.getDate()+1);
console.log(nextDay); // May 01 2000    

See fiddle.

  • 10
    I don't know if it helps in performance, but it can be simplified by using tomorrow.setDate(tomorrow.getDate() + 1); – Gustavo Rodrigues Aug 6 '14 at 14:10
  • This approach will not update the month. So it will still return April if you ask for the month, in the example – marimaf Nov 24 '17 at 22:40
  • 2
    @marimaf - This approach does update the month. His example was a bit wonky because it depended on it being the same month as when he made this answer (I just updated to fix that) but the approach works. – BryanGrezeszak Feb 16 '18 at 8:33
  • thanks.. helped me a lot – kurniawan26 May 17 '18 at 3:14
  • Here's a oneliner that worked better for my needs: var tomorrow = new Date(new Date().setDate(new Date().getDate() + 1)); – Björn Andreasson May 22 at 7:43
34

Copy-pasted from here: Incrementing a date in JavaScript

Three options for you:

Using just JavaScript's Date object (no libraries):

var today = new Date();
var tomorrow = new Date(today.getTime() + (24 * 60 * 60 * 1000));

Or if you don't mind changing the date in place (rather than creating a new date):

var dt = new Date();
dt.setTime(dt.getTime() + (24 * 60 * 60 * 1000));

Edit: See also Jigar's answer and David's comment below: var tomorrow = new Date(); tomorrow.setDate(tomorrow.getDate() + 1);

Using MomentJS:

var today = moment();
var tomorrow = moment(today).add(1, 'days');

(Beware that add modifies the instance you call it on, rather than returning a new instance, so today.add(1, 'days') would modify today. That's why we start with a cloning op on var tomorrow = ....)

Using DateJS, but it hasn't been updated in a long time:

var today = new Date(); // Or Date.today()
var tomorrow = today.add(1).day();
  • Please mark citations as such! – Bergi Apr 15 '14 at 10:43
  • 5
    it would be easier and better to close question as duplicates than to c&p answers. – Bergi Apr 15 '14 at 10:44
  • 3
    @Bergi especially since the answer has changed since it was copied ... – Michael Apr 13 '15 at 19:16
  • 2
    This doesnt work for daylight savings! Try this with new Date(2016, 10, 6) – Chet Oct 6 '16 at 20:38
3

Using Date object guarantees that. For eg if you try to create April 31st :

new Date(2014,3,31)        // Thu May 01 2014 00:00:00

Please note that it's zero indexed, so Jan. is 0, Feb. is 1 etc.

  • 4
    Note that Number literals start with "0" is octal and has been deprecated. So this code may cause an error in strict mode. And, what you wrote is 03 instead of 04 ... – tsh Jan 20 '15 at 4:42
  • @tsh - It's zero indexed. So 3 is correct for April. – BryanGrezeszak Feb 16 '18 at 8:11

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.