50

I need to set up a really lightweight HTTPS server for a Java application. It's a simulator that's being used in our development labs to simulate the HTTPS connections accepted by a piece of equipment in the wild. Because it's purely a lightweight development tool and isn't used in production in any way at all, I'm quite happy to bypass certifications and as much negotiation as I can.

I'm planning on using the HttpsServer class in Java 6 SE but I'm struggling to get it working. As a test client, I'm using wget from the cygwin command line (wget https://[address]:[port]) but wget reports that it was "Unable to establish SSL connection".

If I run wget with the -d option for debugging it tells me "SSL handshake failed".

I've spent 30 minutes googling this and everything seems to just point back to the fairly useless Java 6 documentation that describes the methods but doesn't actually talk about how to get the darn thing talking or provide any example code at all.

Can anyone nudge me in the right direction?

51

What I eventually used was this:

try {
    // Set up the socket address
    InetSocketAddress address = new InetSocketAddress(InetAddress.getLocalHost(), config.getHttpsPort());

    // Initialise the HTTPS server
    HttpsServer httpsServer = HttpsServer.create(address, 0);
    SSLContext sslContext = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");

    // Initialise the keystore
    char[] password = "simulator".toCharArray();
    KeyStore ks = KeyStore.getInstance("JKS");
    FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream("lig.keystore");
    ks.load(fis, password);

    // Set up the key manager factory
    KeyManagerFactory kmf = KeyManagerFactory.getInstance("SunX509");
    kmf.init(ks, password);

    // Set up the trust manager factory
    TrustManagerFactory tmf = TrustManagerFactory.getInstance("SunX509");
    tmf.init(ks);

    // Set up the HTTPS context and parameters
    sslContext.init(kmf.getKeyManagers(), tmf.getTrustManagers(), null);
    httpsServer.setHttpsConfigurator(new HttpsConfigurator(sslContext) {
        public void configure(HttpsParameters params) {
            try {
                // Initialise the SSL context
                SSLContext c = SSLContext.getDefault();
                SSLEngine engine = c.createSSLEngine();
                params.setNeedClientAuth(false);
                params.setCipherSuites(engine.getEnabledCipherSuites());
                params.setProtocols(engine.getEnabledProtocols());

                // Get the default parameters
                SSLParameters defaultSSLParameters = c.getDefaultSSLParameters();
                params.setSSLParameters(defaultSSLParameters);
            } catch (Exception ex) {
                ILogger log = new LoggerFactory().getLogger();
                log.exception(ex);
                log.error("Failed to create HTTPS port");
            }
        }
    });
    LigServer server = new LigServer(httpsServer);
    joinableThreadList.add(server.getJoinableThread());
} catch (Exception exception) {
    log.exception(exception);
    log.error("Failed to create HTTPS server on port " + config.getHttpsPort() + " of localhost");
}

To generate a keystore:

$ keytool -genkeypair -keyalg RSA -alias self_signed -keypass simulator \
  -keystore lig.keystore -storepass simulator

See also here.

Potentially storepass and keypass might be different, in which case the ks.load and kmf.init must use storepass and keypass, respectively.

2
  • Hi, still a newbie. just wondering if you are using the SSLContext that you created when setting the configurator? Since you override configure method and call getDefault(). Not using the SSLContext that is passed in the constructor.
    – william
    Jul 25 '17 at 16:01
  • 2
    Note that in JDK 11 and 12, HttpsServer can't handle TLSv1.3 connections properly by default and causes an infinite loop. The JDK bug is discussed here. The workaround is to set a system property: -Djdk.tls.acknowledgeCloseNotify=true Jul 3 '19 at 8:04
24

I updated your answer for a HTTPS server (not socket-based). It might help with CSRF and AJAX calls.

import java.io.*;
import java.net.InetSocketAddress;
import java.lang.*;
import java.net.URL;
import com.sun.net.httpserver.HttpsServer;
import java.security.KeyStore;
import javax.net.ssl.KeyManagerFactory;
import javax.net.ssl.TrustManagerFactory;
import com.sun.net.httpserver.*;
import javax.net.ssl.SSLEngine;
import javax.net.ssl.SSLParameters;

import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.io.Reader;
import java.net.URLConnection;

import javax.net.ssl.HostnameVerifier;
import javax.net.ssl.HttpsURLConnection;
import javax.net.ssl.SSLContext;
import javax.net.ssl.SSLSession;
import javax.net.ssl.TrustManager;
import javax.net.ssl.X509TrustManager;
import java.security.cert.X509Certificate;

import java.net.InetAddress;
import com.sun.net.httpserver.HttpExchange;
import com.sun.net.httpserver.HttpHandler;
import com.sun.net.httpserver.HttpServer;
import com.sun.net.httpserver.HttpsExchange;

public class SimpleHTTPSServer {

    public static class MyHandler implements HttpHandler {
        @Override
        public void handle(HttpExchange t) throws IOException {
            String response = "This is the response";
            HttpsExchange httpsExchange = (HttpsExchange) t;
            t.getResponseHeaders().add("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
            t.sendResponseHeaders(200, response.getBytes().length);
            OutputStream os = t.getResponseBody();
            os.write(response.getBytes());
            os.close();
        }
    }

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

        try {
            // setup the socket address
            InetSocketAddress address = new InetSocketAddress(8000);

            // initialise the HTTPS server
            HttpsServer httpsServer = HttpsServer.create(address, 0);
            SSLContext sslContext = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");

            // initialise the keystore
            char[] password = "password".toCharArray();
            KeyStore ks = KeyStore.getInstance("JKS");
            FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream("testkey.jks");
            ks.load(fis, password);

            // setup the key manager factory
            KeyManagerFactory kmf = KeyManagerFactory.getInstance("SunX509");
            kmf.init(ks, password);

            // setup the trust manager factory
            TrustManagerFactory tmf = TrustManagerFactory.getInstance("SunX509");
            tmf.init(ks);

            // setup the HTTPS context and parameters
            sslContext.init(kmf.getKeyManagers(), tmf.getTrustManagers(), null);
            httpsServer.setHttpsConfigurator(new HttpsConfigurator(sslContext) {
                public void configure(HttpsParameters params) {
                    try {
                        // initialise the SSL context
                        SSLContext context = getSSLContext();
                        SSLEngine engine = context.createSSLEngine();
                        params.setNeedClientAuth(false);
                        params.setCipherSuites(engine.getEnabledCipherSuites());
                        params.setProtocols(engine.getEnabledProtocols());

                        // Set the SSL parameters
                        SSLParameters sslParameters = context.getSupportedSSLParameters();
                        params.setSSLParameters(sslParameters);

                    } catch (Exception ex) {
                        System.out.println("Failed to create HTTPS port");
                    }
                }
            });
            httpsServer.createContext("/test", new MyHandler());
            httpsServer.setExecutor(null); // creates a default executor
            httpsServer.start();

        } catch (Exception exception) {
            System.out.println("Failed to create HTTPS server on port " + 8000 + " of localhost");
            exception.printStackTrace();

        }
    }

}

To create a self-signed certificate:

keytool -genkeypair -keyalg RSA -alias selfsigned -keystore testkey.jks -storepass password -validity 360 -keysize 2048
4
  • 5
    setExecutor(null) makes a single-threaded server. To have a multithreaded server you need to provide a proper executor. For example: httpsServer.setExecutor(new ThreadPoolExecutor(4, 8, 30, TimeUnit.SECONDS, new ArrayBlockingQueue<Runnable>(100)));
    – rustyx
    Aug 12 '16 at 13:11
  • 1
    Hi, still a newbie. just wondering if you are using the SSLContext that you created when setting the configurator? Since you override configure method and call getDefault(). Not using the SSLContext that is passed in the constructor.
    – william
    Jul 25 '17 at 16:02
  • 2
    Strictly speaking, you should call t.sendResponseHeaders with response.getBytes().length rather than response.length(). It works with the string in your the example, but will break for "Hëllö Wörld".
    – Torgny
    Feb 19 '18 at 8:58
  • context.getSupportedSSLParameters(); should be replaced with c.getSupportedSSLParameters(); , right?
    – Imre
    Dec 29 '18 at 22:09
9

With ServerSocket

You can use the class that HttpsServer is built around to be even more light-weight: ServerSocket.

Single-threaded

The following program is a very simple, single-threaded server listening on port 8443. Messages are encrypted with TLS using the keys in ./keystore.jks:

public static void main(String... args) {
    var address = new InetSocketAddress("0.0.0.0", 8443);

    startSingleThreaded(address);
}

public static void startSingleThreaded(InetSocketAddress address) {

    System.out.println("Start single-threaded server at " + address);

    try (var serverSocket = getServerSocket(address)) {

        var encoding = StandardCharsets.UTF_8;

        // This infinite loop is not CPU-intensive since method "accept" blocks
        // until a client has made a connection to the socket
        while (true) {
            try (var socket = serverSocket.accept();
                 // Use the socket to read the client's request
                 var reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(
                         socket.getInputStream(), encoding.name()));
                 // Writing to the output stream and then closing it sends
                 // data to the client
                 var writer = new BufferedWriter(new OutputStreamWriter(
                         socket.getOutputStream(), encoding.name()))
            ) {
                getHeaderLines(reader).forEach(System.out::println);

                writer.write(getResponse(encoding));
                writer.flush();

            } catch (IOException e) {
                System.err.println("Exception while handling connection");
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        System.err.println("Could not create socket at " + address);
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

private static ServerSocket getServerSocket(InetSocketAddress address)
        throws Exception {

    // Backlog is the maximum number of pending connections on the socket,
    // 0 means that an implementation-specific default is used
    int backlog = 0;

    var keyStorePath = Path.of("./keystore.jks");
    char[] keyStorePassword = "pass_for_self_signed_cert".toCharArray();

    // Bind the socket to the given port and address
    var serverSocket = getSslContext(keyStorePath, keyStorePassword)
            .getServerSocketFactory()
            .createServerSocket(address.getPort(), backlog, address.getAddress());

    // We don't need the password anymore → Overwrite it
    Arrays.fill(keyStorePassword, '0');

    return serverSocket;
}

private static SSLContext getSslContext(Path keyStorePath, char[] keyStorePass)
        throws Exception {

    var keyStore = KeyStore.getInstance("JKS");
    keyStore.load(new FileInputStream(keyStorePath.toFile()), keyStorePass);

    var keyManagerFactory = KeyManagerFactory.getInstance("SunX509");
    keyManagerFactory.init(keyStore, keyStorePass);

    var sslContext = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");
    // Null means using default implementations for TrustManager and SecureRandom
    sslContext.init(keyManagerFactory.getKeyManagers(), null, null);
    return sslContext;
}

private static String getResponse(Charset encoding) {
    var body = "The server says hi 👋\r\n";
    var contentLength = body.getBytes(encoding).length;

    return "HTTP/1.1 200 OK\r\n" +
            String.format("Content-Length: %d\r\n", contentLength) +
            String.format("Content-Type: text/plain; charset=%s\r\n",
                    encoding.displayName()) +
            // An empty line marks the end of the response's header
            "\r\n" +
            body;
}

private static List<String> getHeaderLines(BufferedReader reader)
        throws IOException {
    var lines = new ArrayList<String>();
    var line = reader.readLine();
    // An empty line marks the end of the request's header
    while (!line.isEmpty()) {
        lines.add(line);
        line = reader.readLine();
    }
    return lines;
}

Here's a project using this socket-based approach.

Multi-threaded

To use more than one thread for the server, you can employ a thread pool:

public static void startMultiThreaded(InetSocketAddress address) {

    try (var serverSocket = getServerSocket(address)) {

        System.out.println("Started multi-threaded server at " + address);

        // A cached thread pool with a limited number of threads
        var threadPool = newCachedThreadPool(8);

        var encoding = StandardCharsets.UTF_8;

        // This infinite loop is not CPU-intensive since method "accept" blocks
        // until a client has made a connection to the socket
        while (true) {
            try {
                var socket = serverSocket.accept();
                // Create a response to the request on a separate thread to
                // handle multiple requests simultaneously
                threadPool.submit(() -> {

                    try ( // Use the socket to read the client's request
                          var reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(
                                  socket.getInputStream(), encoding.name()));
                          // Writing to the output stream and then closing it
                          // sends data to the client
                          var writer = new BufferedWriter(new OutputStreamWriter(
                                  socket.getOutputStream(), encoding.name()))
                    ) {
                        getHeaderLines(reader).forEach(System.out::println);
                        writer.write(getResponse(encoding));
                        writer.flush();
                        // We're done with the connection → Close the socket
                        socket.close();

                    } catch (Exception e) {
                        System.err.println("Exception while creating response");
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    }
                });
            } catch (IOException e) {
                System.err.println("Exception while handling connection");
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        System.err.println("Could not create socket at " + address);
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

private static ExecutorService newCachedThreadPool(int maximumNumberOfThreads) {
    return new ThreadPoolExecutor(0, maximumNumberOfThreads,
            60L, TimeUnit.SECONDS,
            new SynchronousQueue<>());
}

Create a certificate

Use the keytool to create a self-signed certificate (you can get a proper certificate from Let's Encrypt for free):

keytool -genkeypair -keyalg RSA -alias selfsigned -keystore keystore.jks \
        -storepass pass_for_self_signed_cert \
        -dname "CN=localhost, OU=Developers, O=Bull Bytes, L=Linz, C=AT"

Contact the server

After starting the server, connect to it with curl:

curl -k https://localhost:8443

This will fetch a message from the server:

The server says hi 👋

Inspect which protocol and cipher suite were established by curl and your server with

curl -kv https://localhost:8443

Using JDK 13 and curl 7.66.0, this produced

SSL connection using TLSv1.3 / TLS_AES_256_GCM_SHA384


Refer to Java Network Programming by Elliotte Rusty Harold for more on the topic.

4
  • While this is a good example of both ServerSocket and TLS basics, it is not quite HTTP(S)... check out RFC 7230 and the related RFCs referenced in it for details on what else an HTTP server would need to implement.
    – amichair
    Jul 1 '19 at 19:50
  • Thanks a lot for your comment, Amichai. You're right, that code is meant to get people started. Is there anything specific you have in mind that the code is missing, assuming that it only has to provide that one text/plain response? Jul 2 '19 at 16:19
  • 1
    Although returning one fixed response makes things simper, the server still has to deal properly with various valid and invalid client requests - e.g. other HTTP methods (verbs), proper error handling and status codes, header folding, request line and header syntax validation, some specific headers handling... just off the top of my head. In a nutshell, you can't control the client/requests, so you must be able to respond to anything it throws at you according to the spec, which may or may not result in sending the fixed response.
    – amichair
    Jul 2 '19 at 22:56
  • Low level implementation ! Dec 15 '19 at 23:25
2

Just a reminder to others: com.sun.net.httpserver.HttpsServer in the solutions above is not part of the Java standard. Although it is bundled with the Oracle/OpenJDK JVM, it is not included in all JVMs so this will not work out of the box everywhere.

There are several lightweight HTTP servers out there that you can embed in your application that support HTTPS and run on any JVM.

One of them is JLHTTP - The Java Lightweight HTTP Server which is a tiny one-file server (or ~50K/35K jar) with no dependencies. Setting up the keystore, SSLContext etc. is similar to the above, since it also relies on the standard JSSE implementation, or you can specify the standard system properties to configure SSL. You can see the FAQ or the code and its documentation for details.

Disclaimer: I'm the author of JLHTTP. You can check it out for yourself and determine if it suits your needs. I hope you find it useful :-)

0
2

Although this question is really old, someone mentioned me this topic and asked if it could be simplified. Most of the answers demonstrate very well how to setup a simple https server with sun, but I want to provide an alternative which is hopefully a bit easier.

For this setup I am assuming you already have the keystore and truststore in place.

The rest endpoint:

import com.sun.net.httpserver.HttpExchange;
import com.sun.net.httpserver.HttpHandler;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.OutputStream;
import java.nio.charset.StandardCharsets;

public class HelloWorldController implements HttpHandler {

    @Override
    public void handle(HttpExchange exchange) throws IOException {
        try (OutputStream responseBody = exchange.getResponseBody()) {

            exchange.getResponseHeaders().set("Content-Type", "text/plain");

            String payload = "Hello";
            exchange.sendResponseHeaders(200, payload.length());
            responseBody.write(payload.getBytes(StandardCharsets.UTF_8));
        }
    }

}

Server configuration:

import com.sun.net.httpserver.HttpsConfigurator;
import com.sun.net.httpserver.HttpsParameters;
import com.sun.net.httpserver.HttpsServer;
import nl.altindag.server.controller.HelloWorldController;
import nl.altindag.ssl.SSLFactory;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.InetSocketAddress;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;

public class App {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        SSLFactory sslFactory = SSLFactory.builder()
                .withIdentityMaterial("keystore.jks", "secret".toCharArray())
                .withTrustMaterial("truststore.jks", "secret".toCharArray())
                .build();

        InetSocketAddress socketAddress = new InetSocketAddress(8443);
        HttpsServer httpsServer = HttpsServer.create(socketAddress, 0);

        httpsServer.setHttpsConfigurator(new HttpsConfigurator(sslFactory.getSslContext()) {
            @Override
            public void configure(HttpsParameters params) {
                params.setSSLParameters(sslFactory.getSslParameters());
            }
        });

        httpsServer.createContext("/api/hello", new HelloWorldController());
        httpsServer.setExecutor(Executors.newCachedThreadPool());
        httpsServer.start();
    }

}

I need to add some disclaimer here... I use SSLFactory class from the Github - SSLContext-Kickstart library to easily construct a SSLContext. It is maintained by me. You don't need to use it as others have provided a way to construct it with just plain java.

1
  • 1
    This proved to be a very clean implementation for the user of the library. Thanks!
    – gkephorus
    Jun 1 '21 at 16:04

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.