431

I have a method that sometimes returns a NoneType value. So how can I question a variable that is a NoneType? I need to use if method, for example

if not new:
    new = '#'

I know that is the wrong way and I hope you understand what I meant.

  • I think this was answered here and apparently somewhere before – yorodm Apr 15 '14 at 14:21
  • If None is the only value your method returns for which bool(returnValue) equals False, then if not new: ought to work fine. This occurs sometimes in the built-in libs - for example, re.match returns either None or a truthy match object. – Kevin Apr 15 '14 at 14:21
  • Also see my answer about null and None in python here. – Michael Ekoka May 8 '18 at 9:25
685

So how can I question a variable that is a NoneType?

Use is operator, like this

if variable is None:

Why this works?

Since None is the sole singleton object of NoneType in Python, we can use is operator to check if a variable has None in it or not.

Quoting from is docs,

The operators is and is not test for object identity: x is y is true if and only if x and y are the same object. x is not y yields the inverse truth value.

Since there can be only one instance of None, is would be the preferred way to check None.


Hear it from the horse's mouth

Quoting Python's Coding Style Guidelines - PEP-008 (jointly defined by Guido himself),

Comparisons to singletons like None should always be done with is or is not, never the equality operators.

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  • So what's the difference between == None and is None? – NoName Nov 7 '19 at 20:36
  • @NoName With respect to None, they both will yield similar result. – thefourtheye Nov 8 '19 at 9:47
  • 3
    this doesn't work if comparing whether a pandas DataFrame exists -- for that, I use type(df) is type(None) to avoid: The truth value of a DataFrame is ambiguous – Marc Maxmeister Mar 6 at 18:43
79
if variable is None:
   ...

if variable is not None:
   ...
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36

It can also be done with isinstance as per Alex Hall's answer :

>>> NoneType = type(None)
>>> x = None
>>> type(x) == NoneType
True
>>> isinstance(x, NoneType)
True

isinstance is also intuitive but there is the complication that it requires the line

NoneType = type(None)

which isn't needed for types like int and float.

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  • Since you can't subclass NoneType and since None is a singleton, isinstance should not be used to detect None - instead you should do as the accepted answer says, and use is None or is not None. – Aaron Hall Dec 4 '18 at 18:59
22

As pointed out by Aaron Hall's comment:

Since you can't subclass NoneType and since None is a singleton, isinstance should not be used to detect None - instead you should do as the accepted answer says, and use is None or is not None.


Original Answer:

The simplest way however, without the extra line in addition to cardamom's answer is probably:
isinstance(x, type(None))

So how can I question a variable that is a NoneType? I need to use if method

Using isinstance() does not require an is within the if-statement:

if isinstance(x, type(None)): 
    #do stuff

Additional information
You can also check for multiple types in one isinstance() statement as mentioned in the documentation. Just write the types as a tuple.

isinstance(x, (type(None), bytes))
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  • 1
    Since you can't subclass NoneType and since None is a singleton, isinstance should not be used to detect None - instead you should do as the accepted answer says, and use is None or is not None. – Aaron Hall Dec 4 '18 at 19:01
  • 1
    @AaronHall Why isinstance should not be used ? I understand that is should be preferred, but there are some cases where the isinstance form feels more natural (like checking for multiple types at once isinstance(x, (str, bool, int, type(None)))). Is it just a personal preference or is there caveat that I'm unaware of ? – Conchylicultor Sep 9 '19 at 13:35
  • @Conchylicultor downsides to your suggestion: 1. global look-up for type 2. then calling it 3. then looking up the type of None - when None is both a singleton and a keyword. Another downside: 4. this is very non-standard and will raise eyebrows when people are looking at your code. x is None is a more optimized check. I would suggest x is None or isinstance(x, (str, bool, int)) - but I would also suggest you think more about what you're doing when you're doing that kind of type checking for types that don't have a lot in common... – Aaron Hall Sep 9 '19 at 15:17
4

Not sure if this answers the question. But I know this took me a while to figure out. I was looping through a website and all of sudden the name of the authors weren't there anymore. So needed a check statement.

if type(author) == type(None):
     my if body
else:
    my else body

Author can be any variable in this case, and None can be any type that you are checking for.

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  • Since None is a singleton, type should not be used to detect None - instead you should do as the accepted answer says, and use is None or is not None. – Aaron Hall Dec 4 '18 at 19:02
2

Python 2.7 :

x = None
isinstance(x, type(None))

or

isinstance(None, type(None))

==> True

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  • 2
    Since you can't subclass NoneType and since None is a singleton, isinstance should not be used to detect None - instead you should do as the accepted answer says, and use is None or is not None. – Aaron Hall Dec 4 '18 at 19:01
0

I hope this example will be helpful for you)

print(type(None) # NoneType

So, you can check type of the variable name

#Example
name = 12 # name = None
if type(name) != type(None):
    print(name)
else:
    print("Can't find name")
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