52

I'm using Socket.io v0.9.16 and Chrome 34

I'm trying to remove a specific listener, or unsubscribe from a specific subscription

Something like this:

socket.on('testComplete',function(data){
    console.log('test complete',data);
}); 

function emitTest(){
    console.log('emitting test');
    socket.emit('test','first emit');
}

function removeListener(){
    socket.removeListener('testComplete');
}

If I call the emitTest function, and then the removeListener function, I still see the 'test complete' message when I call emitTest again. The listener should have been removed, if the socket function even works.

I'm looking for a way to remove a specific listener that actually works.

This answer says that removeListener doesn't work.

Is there any downside to just doing this:

socket.removeListener=function(name){
        if(socket.$events.hasOwnProperty(name)){
            delete socket.$events[name];
        }
    };

I marked an answer as correct, but I'm using the above in my code since it works better with my design.

47

You need to pass in the listener function to removeListener.

function testFun(data){
    console.log('test complete',data);
}

socket.on('testComplete', testFun); 

function emitTest(){
    console.log('emitting test');
    socket.emit('test','first emit');
}

function removeListener(){
    socket.removeListener('testComplete', testFun);
}
  • Would this work in the case that you have multiple functions that do different things with the result of the socket? It seems like this way forces you to run all your sockets through one function. I usually do the socket.on('callback',function(data){... method, which allows me to send and catch the callback within the same function – House- 'Reinstate Monica' -man Apr 15 '14 at 20:10
  • I would have to have twice as many functions, not counting the global listeners, just for the functionality of killing a listener, basically? – House- 'Reinstate Monica' -man Apr 15 '14 at 20:22
  • Why twice as many? You just have to have a reference to the function you passed in. This is the way all EventEmitters on Node work, as well as the convention in browser libraries. If you have an unknown number of handlers registered for a given event and need to remove them all, I think your solution is sensible though. – Semicolon Jul 29 '14 at 21:53
  • perfect solution! – Markenson França May 3 '16 at 2:33
70
//To unsubscribe all listeners of an event
socket.off('event-name');

//to unsubscribe a certain listener
socket.off('event-name', listener);

Note that socket.off, socket.removeListener, socket.removeAllListeners, socket.removeEventListener are synonyms.

This is tested on socket.io v1.4.3

  • 2
    I'm using socket.io 2.0.x and can confirm this works both for specific listeners and without specifying a specific listener to just unbind all functions (including anonymous functions). – Iain Collins Aug 14 '18 at 16:20
  • 2
    This should be the accepted snswer – Sastidar Jul 5 at 14:20
0

If you're not using a function call, or even if you are the following worked for me:

getEventListeners(socket)['testComplete'][0].remove()

You could even loop through all the listeners attached and remove them.

for(var prop in getEventListeners(websocket))
{
    $(getEventListeners(websocket)[prop]).each(function() { this.remove()})
}

It's worth pointing out that although this works, it only works in Chrome at the moment.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.