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I'm running queries in PL/SQL Developer. How to find out the running time of sql query in PL/SQL. I am querying specific tables. Like

select * from table_name where customer_id=1;

select * from movie_table where movie_id=8;

While i am using PL/SQL, i want to know the query running time.

Thanks, your help is very much appreciated.

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  • There is no PL/SQL in your examples Apr 16, 2014 at 12:09
  • Select sysdate from dual before and after each query. Make sure you run each query twice if you want compile time removed from the equation.
    – Dan Bracuk
    Apr 16, 2014 at 12:14
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    Take a look at dbaforums.org/oracle/index.php?showtopic=2213
    – Hamidreza
    Apr 16, 2014 at 12:18
  • well it works on only count. It's not working on select * from table_name where customer_id=1; and it works only on select count (*) from table_name;
    – careem
    Apr 16, 2014 at 12:21
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    If you read the entire page that @Hamidreza mentions you'll see a really simple way to solve your problem.
    – Dan Bracuk
    Apr 16, 2014 at 12:35

2 Answers 2

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The simplest way to do this, courtesy of @Hamidreza's link, is like this:

set timing on;
select * from table_name where customer_id=1;

The execution time will appear below the records selected.

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  • Need to issue these SQL commands from Command Line window, not the SQL window.
    – James Wu
    May 15 at 17:41
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I think you can use dbms_utility.get_time function.

l_start := dbms_utility.get_time;
select * from table_name where customer_id=1;
select * from movie_table where movie_id=8;
l_end := dbms_utility.get_time;
l_diff := (l_end-l_start)/100;
dbms_output.put_line('Overall Time: '|| l_diff);

Something like this, in brief.

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  • Thank you for your reply. I tried in SQL Window and didn't work.
    – careem
    Apr 16, 2014 at 12:23
  • Do you execute it on SQL Window and have added it to a PL/SQL function?
    – Guneli
    Apr 16, 2014 at 12:30

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