60

I was wondering if is possible to create an instance of a generic type in Dart. In other languages like Java you could work around this using reflection, but I'm not sure if this is possible in Dart.

I have this class:

class GenericController <T extends RequestHandler> {

    void processRequest() {
        T t = new T();  // ERROR
    }
}
3
  • 1
    Type parameters in Dart implements the interface Type. The Type interface does not declares any members. This means that the interface Type used only as the identity key of runtime types. The reflection procedures built into Dart SDK but they are not a part of Dart core. This means that if you want to introspect your program you should use reflection library. Bridge between your program (at runtime) and reflection library are the interface Type. You request (reflect) required information about the classes using this interface.
    – mezoni
    Apr 16, 2014 at 15:53
  • 1
    See also github.com/dart-lang/sdk/issues/12921 Jun 4, 2015 at 14:29
  • Not exact solution but, this may work for you; void processRequest(T t) { t.something(); } Feb 20 at 12:35

8 Answers 8

97

I tried mezonis approach with the Activator and it works. But it is an expensive approach as it uses mirrors, which requires you to use "mirrorsUsed" if you don't want to have a 2-4MB js file.

This morning I had the idea to use a generic typedef as generator and thus get rid of reflection:

You define a method type like this: (Add params if necessary)

typedef S ItemCreator<S>();

or even better:

typedef ItemCreator<S> = S Function();

Then in the class that needs to create the new instances:

class PagedListData<T>{
  ...
  ItemCreator<T> creator;
  PagedListData(ItemCreator<T> this.creator) {

  }

  void performMagic() {
      T item = creator();
      ... 
  }
}

Then you can instantiate the PagedList like this:

PagedListData<UserListItem> users 
         = new PagedListData<UserListItem>(()=> new UserListItem());

You don't lose the advantage of using generic because at declaration time you need to provide the target class anyway, so defining the creator method doesn't hurt.

6
  • 7
    Works with flutter
    – Soul_man
    Jun 10, 2018 at 23:24
  • 1
    it totally worked for me. But I don't understand how creator() is creating an instance of T and not an instance of ItemCreator<T>. Can you explain that for me?
    – tufekoi
    Apr 26, 2019 at 22:22
  • 1
    ItemCreator<T> is a function type of a function that returns something of type T, as you can see in the typedef. In the last code snippet you can see that the PagedListData instance is created and an instance of the creator function is provided. This is just a template and not a function call. This function is only called in the middle code snippet at "creator()". Does that help? Apr 27, 2019 at 20:27
  • 3
    There really is no magic here. It boils down to delegating the instantiation responsibility to the consumer, via a callback. It's not a bad solution, but it would have been nice to be able to dynamically instantiate a type inside PagedListData without it. But I don't think it's possible without mirrors, which we don't have in Flutter.
    – DarkNeuron
    May 13, 2019 at 15:25
  • 1
    As a matter of taste you might want your PagedListData and creator() declared abstract so that they are implemented on the sub-class level rather than by client. Jul 17, 2019 at 15:29
14

You can use similar code:

import "dart:mirrors";

void main() {
  var controller = new GenericController<Foo>();
  controller.processRequest();
}

class GenericController<T extends RequestHandler> {
  void processRequest() {
    //T t = new T();
    T t = Activator.createInstance(T);
    t.tellAboutHimself();
  }
}

class Foo extends RequestHandler {
  void tellAboutHimself() {
    print("Hello, I am 'Foo'");
  }
}

abstract class RequestHandler {
  void tellAboutHimself();
}

class Activator {
  static createInstance(Type type, [Symbol constructor, List
      arguments, Map<Symbol, dynamic> namedArguments]) {
    if (type == null) {
      throw new ArgumentError("type: $type");
    }

    if (constructor == null) {
      constructor = const Symbol("");
    }

    if (arguments == null) {
      arguments = const [];
    }

    var typeMirror = reflectType(type);
    if (typeMirror is ClassMirror) {
      return typeMirror.newInstance(constructor, arguments, 
        namedArguments).reflectee;
    } else {
      throw new ArgumentError("Cannot create the instance of the type '$type'.");
    }
  }
}
1
  • 7
    Won't work with flutter yet. +1 for Patrik's approach below.
    – Soul_man
    Jun 10, 2018 at 23:24
10

I don't know if this is still useful to anyone. But I have found an easy workaround. In the function you want to initialize the type T, pass an extra argument of type T Function(). This function should return an instance of T. Now whenever you want to create object of T, call the function.

class foo<T> {
    void foo(T Function() creator) {
        final t = creator();
        // use t
    }
}

P.S. inspired by Patrick's answer

7

Here's my work around for this sad limitation

class RequestHandler {
  static final _constructors = {
    RequestHandler: () => RequestHandler(),
    RequestHandler2: () => RequestHandler2(),
  };
  static RequestHandler create(Type type) {
    return _constructors[type]();
  }
}

class RequestHandler2 extends RequestHandler {}

class GenericController<T extends RequestHandler> {
  void processRequest() {
    //T t = new T(); // ERROR
    T t = RequestHandler.create(T);
  }
}

test() {
  final controller = GenericController<RequestHandler2>();
  controller.processRequest();
}
4

Sorry but as far as I know, a type parameter cannot be used to name a constructor in an instance creation expression in Dart.

2

Working with FLutter

typedef S ItemCreator<S>();

mixin SharedExtension<T> {

    T getSPData(ItemCreator<T> creator) async {
        return creator();
    }
}

Abc a = sharedObj.getSPData(()=> Abc());

P.S. inspired by Patrick

1
  • Why is the function async btw?
    – Hemil
    Aug 26, 2020 at 11:45
1

2022 answer

Just came across this problem and found out that although instantiating using T() is still not possible, you can get the constructor of an object easier with SomeClass.new in dart>=2.15.

So what you could do is:

MyClass<T> {
  final T Function() creator;
  MyClass(this.creator);

  T getGenericInstance() {
    return creator();
  }
}

and when using it:

final myClass = MyClass<SomeOtherClass>(SomeOtherClass.new)

Nothing different but looks cleaner imo.

-1

Inspired by Patrick's answer, this is the factory I ended up with.

class ServiceFactory<T> {
  static final Map<Type, dynamic> _cache = <String, dynamic>{};

  static T getInstance<T>(T Function() creator) {
    String typeName = T.toString();
    return _cache.putIfAbsent(typeName, () => creator());
  }
}

Then I would use it like this.

final authClient = ServiceFactory.getInstance<AuthenticationClient>(() => AuthenticationClient());

Warning: Erik made a very good point in the comment below that the same type name can exist in multiple packages and that will cause issues. As much as I dislike to force the user to pass in a string key (that way it's the consumer's responsibility to ensuring the uniqueness of the type name), that might be the only way.

3
  • Hi James, note that it is error-prone and unnecessary to transform the Type instance to a string (apparently, a comment will not contain code, so please reformat): /* Library 'lib.dart'. */ class C {} /* Library 'main.dart'. */ import 'lib.dart' as lib; class C {} void main() { print('${(C).toString()} == ${((lib.C).toString())}'); } The point is that two different libraries may declare a class with the same name, and they will have the same toString, but they are not the same class.
    – Erik Ernst
    Feb 21 at 16:07
  • @ErikErnst You make a very good point and I have edited the answer to include a warning to that effect, thanks!. Feb 21 at 17:50
  • 1
    Thanks! Actually, you would just use Map<Type, dynamic> _cache and _cache.putIfAbsent(T, () => creator());.
    – Erik Ernst
    Feb 22 at 18:28

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