8

I've got a map that stores a simple struct with a key. The struct has two member functions, one is const the other not. I've managed calling the const function using std::for_each without any problems, but I've got some problems calling the non-const function.

struct MyStruct {
  void someConstFunction() const;
  void someFunction();
};

typedef std::map<int, MyStruct> MyMap;
MyMap theMap;

//call the const member function
std::for_each(theMap.begin(), theMap.end(),
   boost::bind(&MyStruct::someConstFunction, boost::bind(&MyMap::value_type::second, _1)));

//call the non-const member function
std::for_each(theMap.begin(), theMap.end(),
   boost::bind(&MyStruct::someFunction, boost::bind(&MyMap::value_type::second, _1)));

The call to the const member function works fine, but it seems boost internally expects a const MyStruct somewhere, and thus fails with the following compilation error in MSVC7.1.

boost\bind\mem_fn_template.hpp(151): error C2440: 'argument' : cannot convert from 'const MyStruct *__w64 ' to 'MyStruct *const '

I'd appreciate any help on how to set the template parameters correctly, so bind does recognize the parameters correctly and let me call the non const function.

thanks, Carl

2
  • How about if you back up and tell us what you're really trying to accomplish here? Using for_each with a map with boost::bind might be reasonable, but chances are pretty good that a different general approach will work better (many times this kind of question arises, it's because std::for_each is a poor choice for the situation, and something like std::copy or std::accumulate` would do the job much more simply). Commented Feb 22, 2010 at 15:24
  • The MyStruct is used in a sort of particle system, where MyStruct is the particle. The const function is a draw() function, the non-const function computes the new position. The key in the map is the creation date. Anyway, at the point I posted the question it was more about how to make that work than if this was a good design in the beginning.
    – Carl
    Commented Feb 22, 2010 at 15:36

4 Answers 4

8

IIRC, Boost.Bind uses boost::mem_fn for its binding to members capability. Now, if you look at mem_fun (scroll down to the // data member support part), you'll see that it typedefs its result_type as a const&, while is still has overloads of the function call operator supporting the extraction of a non-const member from a non-const argument.

It thus seems that the problem is that this confuses Boost.Bind's return type deduction mechanism. A solution would thus to explicitly tell Bind that the result is not const:

//call the non-const member function
std::for_each(theMap.begin(), theMap.end(),
   boost::bind(&MyStruct::someFunction, 
       boost::bind<MyStruct&>(&MyMap::value_type::second, _1)
   )
);
3
  • +1 Nice detective work. :-) Strangely, using boost::lamba::bind will compile without explicitly specifying the return type. Perhaps boost::lamda::bind is smarter than boost::bind in deducing return types? Commented Feb 22, 2010 at 16:45
  • Wow, thank you very much. That compiles just fine. Though I love to use Boost it's still quite hard for me to read most of their code, so I failed. Thanks for your help.
    – Carl
    Commented Feb 22, 2010 at 16:56
  • I think you mean boost::mem_fn
    – Manuel
    Commented Feb 23, 2010 at 9:26
7

If you find yourself having to do this a lot I recommend you use the Boost.RangeEx library:

#include <boost/range/algorithm/for_each.hpp>
#include <boost/range/adaptor/map.hpp>
#include <boost/mem_fn.hpp>
#include <map>

struct MyStruct {
  void someConstFunction() const;
  void someFunction();
};

typedef std::map<int, MyStruct> MyMap;
MyMap theMap;

int main()
{
    //call the const member function
    boost::for_each(theMap | boost::adaptors::map_values,
                    boost::mem_fn(&MyStruct::someConstFunction));

    //call the non-const member function
    boost::for_each(theMap | boost::adaptors::map_values,
                    boost::mem_fn(&MyStruct::someFunction));
}

It's been accepted into Boost but it doesn't come with the official distribution yet. Until it does you can download it from the Boost Vault (download link to zip file).

6
  • That looks a lot more readable and understandable than the bind solution. It's definitely worth a closer look. Thanks for the tip.
    – Carl
    Commented Feb 22, 2010 at 15:50
  • @Carl - also notice that boost::mem_fn is easier to use than boost::bind in this case
    – Manuel
    Commented Feb 22, 2010 at 15:52
  • This answer is orthogonal to the question, it replaces the std::for_each loop by boost::for_each, but does not tell how to use boost::bind as argument to either. Even so, it does provide a workaround. Commented Feb 23, 2010 at 8:49
  • @David - I think the workaround is the best solution here. People trying to do overly complex things with bind remind me of that saying about regular expressions: "some people, when confronted with a problem..."
    – Manuel
    Commented Feb 23, 2010 at 9:28
  • Yes, but the workaround is using mem_fn, not the for_each change. That is, using boost::mem_fn instead of boost::bind provides a workaround, but that is completely orthogonal to the change from std::for_each to boost::for_each. Commented Feb 23, 2010 at 9:48
4

If you are already depend on Boost, you may be willing to check Boost Foreach

BOOST_FOREACH(MyMap::value_type const& val, MyMap)
{
  val.second.someConstFunction();
}

Much much readable, though I don't know about performance issues.

Also note that you can't use templated typed within the macro without "escaping" the , character:

  • either by a typedef before
  • or by using a second pair of parenthesis around the type
4
  • I know Boost Foreach and that works of course. But I'm just curious to find the correct syntax to the above solution, since the code above works fine for the const function and fails for the non-const one.
    – Carl
    Commented Feb 22, 2010 at 15:41
  • 4
    I believe the correct code would be (remove the const if you want to change the values): BOOST_FOREACH(MyMap::value_type const& val, theMap) { ... }
    – Bklyn
    Commented Feb 22, 2010 at 17:37
  • and you don't have to link to boost when using Boost.Bind or Boost.Foreach Commented Feb 23, 2010 at 0:28
  • @Rupert: corrected the "linked" by "depend" since it's effectively more clear that you merely have a dependence since those are header only libraries. Commented Feb 23, 2010 at 16:02
0

One problem I spotted: the second bind is called for a non function member. second is a data member, not a method of std::pair

1
  • 3
    I found this technique in this article: informit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=412354&seqNum=4 It states "You can bind to a member variable just as you can with a member function, or a free function.". Since the for_each code is essentially the same for both member functions and the problem is only encountered in the call to the non-const member function, I guess the article's correct.
    – Carl
    Commented Feb 22, 2010 at 15:29

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