How do you perform debounce in React.js?

I want to debounce the handleOnChange.

I tried with debounce(this.handleOnChange, 200) but it doesn't work.

function debounce(fn, delay) {
  var timer = null;
  return function () {
    var context = this, args = arguments;
    clearTimeout(timer);
    timer = setTimeout(function () {
      fn.apply(context, args);
    }, delay);
  };
}
var SearchBox = React.createClass({

    render:function () {
    return (
    <input  type="search" name="p"
       onChange={this.handleOnChange}/>
    );
    },
    handleOnChange: function (event) {
       //make ajax call
    }
});
  • I met the same problem with you, superb answers below!but I think you used wrong way of debounce. here, when onChange={debounce(this.handleOnChange, 200)}/>, it will invoke debounce function every time. but ,in fact, what we need is invoke the function what debounce function returned. – pingfengafei Feb 26 at 3:13

16 Answers 16

In 2018: try promise debouncing

We often want to debounce api calls to avoid flooding the backend with useless requests.

In 2018, still working with callbacks (Lodash/Underscore) feels bad and error prone to me. It's easy to encounter boilerplate and concurrency issues due to api calls resolving unordered.

I've created a little library with React in mind to solve your pains: awesome-debounce-promise

This should not be more complicated than that:

const searchAPI = text => fetch('/search?text=' + encodeURIComponent(text));

const searchAPIDebounced = AwesomeDebouncePromise(searchAPI, 500);

class SearchInputAndResults extends React.Component {
  state = {
    text: '',
    results: null,
  };

  handleTextChange = async text => {
    this.setState({ text, results: null });
    const result = await searchAPIDebounced(text);
    this.setState({ result });
  };
}

The debounced function ensures that:

  • api calls will be debounced
  • the debounced function always returns a promise
  • only the last call's returned promise will resolve
  • a single this.setState({ result }); will happen per api-call

Eventually, you may add another trick if your component unmounts:

componentWillUnmount() {
  this.setState = () => {};
}

Note that Observables (RxJS) can also be a great fit for debouncing inputs, but it's a more powerful abstraction which may be harder to learn/use correctly.


Still want to use callback debouncing?

The important part here is to create a single debounced (or throttled) function per component instance. You don't want to recreate the debounce (or throttle) function everytime, and you don't want either multiple instances to share the same debounced function.

I'm not defining debouncing function in this answer as it's not really relevant, but this answer will work perfectly fine with _.debounce of underscore or lodash, as well as user-provided debouncing function.


NOT a good idea:

var SearchBox = React.createClass({
  method: function() {...},
  debouncedMethod: debounce(this.method,100);
});

It won't work, because during class description object creation, this is not the object created itself. this.method does not return what you expect because the this context is not the object itself (which actually does not really exist yet BTW as it is just being created).


NOT a good idea:

var SearchBox = React.createClass({
  method: function() {...},
  debouncedMethod: function() {
      var debounced = debounce(this.method,100);
      debounced();
  },
});

This time you are effectively creating a debounced function that calls your this.method. The problem is that you are recreating it on every debouncedMethod call, so the newly created debounce function does not know anything about former calls! You must reuse the same debounced function over time or the debouncing will not happen.


NOT a good idea:

var SearchBox = React.createClass({
  debouncedMethod: debounce(function () {...},100),
});

This is a little bit tricky here.

All the mounted instances of the class will share the same debounced function, and most often this is not what you want!. See JsFiddle: 3 instances are producting only 1 log entry globally.

You have to create a debounced function for each component instance, and not a singe debounced function at the class level, shared by each component instance.


GOOD IDEA:

Because debounced functions are stateful, we have to create one debounced function per component instance.

ES6 (class property): recommended

class SearchBox extends React.Component {
    method = debounce(() => { 
      ...
    });
}

ES6 (class constructor)

class SearchBox extends React.Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.method = debounce(this.method,1000);
    }
    method() { ... }
}

ES5

var SearchBox = React.createClass({
    method: function() {...},
    componentWillMount: function() {
       this.method = debounce(this.method,100);
    },
});

See JsFiddle: 3 instances are producting 1 log entry per instance (that makes 3 globally).


Take care of React's event pooling

This is related because we often want to debounce or throttle DOM events.

In React, the event objects (ie, SyntheticEvent) that you receive in callbacks are pooled (this is now documented). This means that after the event callback has be called, the SyntheticEvent you receive will be put back in the pool with empty attributes to reduce the GC pressure.

So if you access SyntheticEvent properties async to the original callback (as it may be the case if you throttle/debounce), the properties you access may be erased. If you want the event to never be put back in the pool, you can use the persist() method.

Without persist (default behavior: pooled event)

onClick = e => {
  alert(`sync -> hasNativeEvent=${!!e.nativeEvent}`);
  setTimeout(() => {
    alert(`async -> hasNativeEvent=${!!e.nativeEvent}`);
  }, 0);
};

The 2nd (async) will print hasNativeEvent=false because the event properties have been cleaned up.

With persist

onClick = e => {
  e.persist();
  alert(`sync -> hasNativeEvent=${!!e.nativeEvent}`);
  setTimeout(() => {
    alert(`async -> hasNativeEvent=${!!e.nativeEvent}`);
  }, 0);
};

The 2nd (async) will print hasNativeEvent=true because persist() permits to avoid putting back the event in the pool.

You can test these 2 behaviors here JsFiddle

Read Julen's answer for an example of using persist() with a throttle/debounce function.

  • 3
    Superb answer, this is great for setting form fields state as 'interacting' for a few seconds after they stop typing, and then being able to cancel on form submit or onBlur – arush_try.com Oct 29 '15 at 20:04
  • 8
    Note that in ES6, instead of defining your method inside the constructor (feels weird) you can do handleOnChange = debounce((e) => { /* onChange handler code here */ }, timeout) at the top level of your class. You're still effectively setting an instance member but it looks a bit more like a normal method definition. No need for a constructor if you don't already have one defined. I suppose it's mostly a style preference. – thom_nic Jan 12 '16 at 21:19
  • 19
    Don't forget to cancel the debounced method in componentWillUnmount: this.method.cancel() - otherwise it might want to setState on an unmounted component. – elado Jan 21 '16 at 22:11
  • 4
    @JonasKello you can't debounce inside a stateless component because the debounced function is actually stateful. You need a stateful component to hold that debounced function, but you can call a stateless component with an already debounced function if needed. – Sebastien Lorber Apr 1 '16 at 8:02
  • 1
    Why all answer includes _.debounce instead of writing the function ? It needs the whole library for that function ? – chifliiiii Aug 16 '16 at 0:59

Uncontrolled Components

You can use the event.persist() method.

An example follows using underscore's _.debounce():

var SearchBox = React.createClass({

  componentWillMount: function () {
     this.delayedCallback = _.debounce(function (event) {
       // `event.target` is accessible now
     }, 1000);
  },

  onChange: function (event) {
    event.persist();
    this.delayedCallback(event);
  },

  render: function () {
    return (
      <input type="search" onChange={this.onChange} />
    );
  }

});

Edit: See this JSFiddle


Controlled Components

Update: the example above shows an uncontrolled component. I use controlled elements all the time so here's another example of the above, but without using the event.persist() "trickery".

A JSFiddle is available as well. Example without underscore

var SearchBox = React.createClass({
    getInitialState: function () {
        return {
            query: this.props.query
        };
    },

    componentWillMount: function () {
       this.handleSearchDebounced = _.debounce(function () {
           this.props.handleSearch.apply(this, [this.state.query]);
       }, 500);
    },

    onChange: function (event) {
      this.setState({query: event.target.value});
      this.handleSearchDebounced();
    },

    render: function () {
      return (
        <input type="search"
               value={this.state.query}
               onChange={this.onChange} />
      );
    }
});


var Search = React.createClass({
    getInitialState: function () {
        return {
            result: this.props.query
        };
    },

    handleSearch: function (query) {
        this.setState({result: query});
    },

    render: function () {
      return (
        <div id="search">
          <SearchBox query={this.state.result}
                     handleSearch={this.handleSearch} />
          <p>You searched for: <strong>{this.state.result}</strong></p>
        </div>
      );
    }
});

React.render(<Search query="Initial query" />, document.body);

Edit: updated examples and JSFiddles to React 0.12

Edit: updated examples to address the issue raised by Sebastien Lorber

Edit: updated with jsfiddle that does not use underscore and uses plain javascript debounce.

  • This does not work for inputs. The event target in the debounced function no longer has a value... so the input stays empty. – Etai Jul 29 '14 at 8:16
  • 1
    Slightly complex, this. You have to be a bit careful about props. If you set <input value={this.props.someprop}... then it won't render properly as the update on keypress doesn't make it back into the component until after the debounce. It's fine to omit the value= if you're happy for this to be unmanaged, but if you'd like to pre-populate the value and/or bind it somewhere else then obviously this doesn't work. – Alastair Maw Aug 26 '14 at 16:08
  • 1
    @AlastairMaw the question had an uncontrolled component, that's why the reply has it too. I've added below an alternative version for controlled components, with a pre-populated value. – julen Aug 27 '14 at 11:51
  • 2
    this is very dangerous if you mount the component mutiple times in the DOM, see stackoverflow.com/questions/23123138/… – Sebastien Lorber Jan 20 '15 at 13:38
  • 2
    while this is a great answer, I don't recommend using persist especially when there may be lots of events, like on mousemove. I have seen code become totally unresponsive that way. It is much more efficient to extract the needed data from the native event in the event call, and then call the debounced / throttled function with the data only, NOT the event itself. No need to persist the event that way – MrE Jan 17 at 21:57

If all you need from the event object is to get the DOM input element, the solution is much simpler – just use ref

class Item extends React.Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.saveTitle = _.throttle(this.saveTitle.bind(this), 1000);
    }
    saveTitle(){
        let val = this.inputTitle.value;
        // make the ajax call
    }
    render() {
        return <input 
                    ref={ el => this.inputTitle = el } 
                    type="text" 
                    defaultValue={this.props.title} 
                    onChange={this.saveTitle} />
    }
}

I found this post by Justin Tulk very helpful. After a couple of attempts, in what one would perceive to be the more official way with react/redux, it shows that it fails due to React's synthetic event pooling. His solution then uses some internal state to track the value changed/entered in the input, with a callback right after setState which calls a throttled/debounced redux action that shows some results in realtime.

import React, {Component} from 'react'
import TextField from 'material-ui/TextField'
import { debounce } from 'lodash'

class TableSearch extends Component {

  constructor(props){
    super(props)

    this.state = {
        value: props.value
    }

    this.changeSearch = debounce(this.props.changeSearch, 250)
  }

  handleChange = (e) => {
    const val = e.target.value

    this.setState({ value: val }, () => {
      this.changeSearch(val)
    })
  }

  render() {

    return (
        <TextField
            className = {styles.field}
            onChange = {this.handleChange}
            value = {this.props.value}
        />
    )
  }
}

After struggling with the text inputs for a while and not finding a perfect solution on my own, I found this on npm https://www.npmjs.com/package/react-debounce-input

Here is a simple example:

import React from 'react';
import ReactDOM from 'react-dom';
import {DebounceInput} from 'react-debounce-input';

class App extends React.Component {
state = {
    value: ''
};

render() {
    return (
    <div>
        <DebounceInput
        minLength={2}
        debounceTimeout={300}
        onChange={event => this.setState({value: event.target.value})} />

        <p>Value: {this.state.value}</p>
    </div>
    );
}
}

const appRoot = document.createElement('div');
document.body.appendChild(appRoot);
ReactDOM.render(<App />, appRoot);

The DebounceInput component accepts all of the props you can assign to a normal input element. Try it out on codepen

I hope it helps someone else too and saves them some time.

  • While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. - From Review – rkosegi Nov 1 '17 at 12:47
  • @rkosegi added an example of how to use the proposed solution. – Hooman Askari Nov 1 '17 at 13:32

Using ES6 CLASS and React 15.x.x & lodash.debounce Im using React's refs here since event losses the this bind internally.

class UserInput extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {
      userInput: ""
    };
    this.updateInput = _.debounce(this.updateInput, 500);
  }


  updateInput(userInput) {
    this.setState({
      userInput
    });
    //OrderActions.updateValue(userInput);//do some server stuff
  }


  render() {
    return ( <div>
      <p> User typed: {
        this.state.userInput
      } </p>
      <input ref = "userValue" onChange = {() => this.updateInput(this.refs.userValue.value) } type = "text" / >
      </div>
    );
  }
}

ReactDOM.render( <
  UserInput / > ,
  document.getElementById('root')
);
<script src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/npm/lodash@4.17.5/lodash.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>


<div id="root"></div>

If you are using redux you can do this in a very elegant way with middleware. You can define a Debounce middleware as:

var timeout;
export default store => next => action => {
  const { meta = {} } = action;
  if(meta.debounce){
    clearTimeout(timeout);
    timeout = setTimeout(() => {
      next(action)
    }, meta.debounce)
  }else{
    next(action)
  }
}

You can then add debouncing to action creators, such as:

export default debouncedAction = (payload) => ({
  type : 'DEBOUNCED_ACTION',
  payload : payload,
  meta : {debounce : 300}
}

There's actually already middleware you can get off npm to do this for you.

You can use Lodash debounce https://lodash.com/docs/4.17.5#debounce method. It is simple and effective.

import * as lodash from lodash;

const update = (input) => {
    // Update the input here.
    console.log(`Input ${input}`);     
}

const debounceHandleUpdate = lodash.debounce((input) => update(input), 200, {maxWait: 200});

doHandleChange() {
   debounceHandleUpdate(input);
}

You can also cancel the debounce method by using the below method.

this.debounceHandleUpdate.cancel();

Hope it helps you. Cheers!!

Lots of good info here already, but to be succinct. This works for me...

import React, {Component} from 'react';
import _ from 'lodash';

class MyComponent extends Component{
      constructor(props){
        super(props);
        this.handleChange = _.debounce(this.handleChange.bind(this),700);
      }; 

Here is an example I came up with that wraps another class with a debouncer. This lends itself nicely to being made into a decorator/higher order function:

export class DebouncedThingy extends React.Component {
    static ToDebounce = ['someProp', 'someProp2'];
    constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.state = {};
    }
    // On prop maybe changed
    componentWillReceiveProps = (nextProps) => {
        this.debouncedSetState();
    };
    // Before initial render
    componentWillMount = () => {
        // Set state then debounce it from here on out (consider using _.throttle)
        this.debouncedSetState();
        this.debouncedSetState = _.debounce(this.debouncedSetState, 300);
    };
    debouncedSetState = () => {
        this.setState(_.pick(this.props, DebouncedThingy.ToDebounce));
    };
    render() {
        const restOfProps = _.omit(this.props, DebouncedThingy.ToDebounce);
        return <Thingy {...restOfProps} {...this.state} />
    }
}

Instead of wrapping the handleOnChange in a debounce(), why not wrap the ajax call inside the callback function inside the debounce, thereby not destroying the event object. So something like this:

handleOnChange: function (event) {
   debounce(
     $.ajax({})
  , 250);
}
  • 2
    Because the event object is not immutable and is destroyed by ReactJS, so even if you wrap and attain a closure capture, the code will fail. – Henrik Jun 10 '15 at 19:24

I was searching for a solution to the same problem and came across this thread as well as some others but they had the same problem: if you are trying to do a handleOnChange function and you need the value from an event target, you will get cannot read property value of null or some such error. In my case, I also needed to preserve the context of this inside the debounced function since I'm executing a fluxible action. Here's my solution, it works well for my use case so I'm leaving it here in case anyone comes across this thread:

// at top of file:
var myAction = require('../actions/someAction');

// inside React.createClass({...});

handleOnChange: function (event) {
    var value = event.target.value;
    var doAction = _.curry(this.context.executeAction, 2);

    // only one parameter gets passed into the curried function,
    // so the function passed as the first parameter to _.curry()
    // will not be executed until the second parameter is passed
    // which happens in the next function that is wrapped in _.debounce()
    debouncedOnChange(doAction(myAction), value);
},

debouncedOnChange: _.debounce(function(action, value) {
    action(value);
}, 300)

for throttle or debounce the best way is to create a function creator so you can use it any where, for example:

  updateUserProfileField(fieldName) {
    const handler = throttle(value => {
      console.log(fieldName, value);
    }, 400);
    return evt => handler(evt.target.value.trim());
  }

and in your render method you can do:

<input onChange={this.updateUserProfileField("givenName").bind(this)}/>

the updateUserProfileField method will create a separated function each time you call it.

Note don't try to return the handler directly for example this will not work:

 updateUserProfileField(fieldName) {
    return evt => throttle(value => {
      console.log(fieldName, value);
    }, 400)(evt.target.value.trim());
  }

the reason why this will not work because this will generate a new throttle function each time the event called instead of using the same throttle function, so basically the throttle will be useless ;)

Also if you use debounce or throttle you don't need setTimeout or clearTimeout, this is actually why we use them :P

Julen solution is kind of hard to read, here's clearer and to-the-point react code for anyone who stumbled him based on title and not the tiny details of the question.

tl;dr version: when you would update to observers send call a schedule method instead and that in turn will actually notify the observers (or perform ajax, etc)

Complete jsfiddle with example component http://jsfiddle.net/7L655p5L/4/

var InputField = React.createClass({

    getDefaultProps: function () {
        return {
            initialValue: '',
            onChange: null
        };
    },

    getInitialState: function () {
        return {
            value: this.props.initialValue
        };
    },

    render: function () {
        var state = this.state;
        return (
            <input type="text"
                   value={state.value}
                   onChange={this.onVolatileChange} />
        );
    },

    onVolatileChange: function (event) {
        this.setState({ 
            value: event.target.value 
        });

        this.scheduleChange();
    },

    scheduleChange: _.debounce(function () {
        this.onChange();
    }, 250),

    onChange: function () {
        var props = this.props;
        if (props.onChange != null) {
            props.onChange.call(this, this.state.value)
        }
    },

});
  • 2
    Won't this make the state/timing of the debounce global across all instances of InputField, because it's created with the class definition? Maybe that's what you want, but it's worth noting regardless. – robbles Dec 27 '14 at 0:26
  • 1
    dangerous if mounted multiple time in the dom, check stackoverflow.com/questions/23123138/… – Sebastien Lorber Jan 20 '15 at 13:38
  • 2
    This is a bad solution, because of double-mount issues -- you're making your function to scheduleChange a singleton and that's not a good idea. -1 – Henrik Jun 11 '15 at 7:14

You can also use a self-written mixin, something like this:

var DebounceMixin = {
  debounce: function(func, time, immediate) {
    var timeout = this.debouncedTimeout;
    if (!timeout) {
      if (immediate) func();
      this.debouncedTimeout = setTimeout(function() {
        if (!immediate) func();
        this.debouncedTimeout = void 0;
      }.bind(this), time);
    }
  }
};

And then use it in your component like this:

var MyComponent = React.createClass({
  mixins: [DebounceMixin],
  handleClick: function(e) {
    this.debounce(function() {
      this.setState({
        buttonClicked: true
      });
    }.bind(this), 500, true);
  },
  render: function() {
    return (
      <button onClick={this.handleClick}></button>
    );
  }
});
  • 2
    That's not debounce, it's 'delay'. Debounce resets the timeout every event that happens before the timeout. -1 – Henrik Jun 11 '15 at 7:13
  • @Henrik My bad, you are right. By the way, it's easy to make debounce like this. – canvaskisa Jun 11 '15 at 12:50
  • 5
    @canvaskisa so edit your answer if it's easy – caub Nov 9 '15 at 8:07
  • this solution does not answer the question, as it would trigger the action exactly after the specified timeout. But in this topic the timeout should be "extendable" if the debounce is called multiple times within the timeout. – Breaker222 Oct 2 at 15:26

One does not need a ton of local variables for a decent throttle function. The purpose of a throttle function is to reduce browser resources, not to apply so much overhead that you are using even more. As proof of evidence of this claim, I have devised a throttle function that has only 4 "hanging" variables in its scope. (A "hanging" variable is a variable that is never garbage collected because it always remains referenced by a function that could potentially be called, thereby soaking up memory.) A handful of throttle functions usually do not ever do any harm; but, if there are thousands of throttled functions, then memory starts to become scarce if you use a really inefficient throttle function. My solution is below.

var timenow=self.performance ? performance.now.bind(performance) : Date.now;
function throttle(func, alternateFunc, minInterval) {
    var lastTimeWent = -minInterval, freshArguments=null;
    function executeLater(){
        func.apply(null, freshArguments);
        freshArguments = null;
        lastTimeWent = 0;
    }
    return function() {
        var newTimeWent = timenow();
        if ((newTimeWent-lastTimeWent) > minInterval) {
            lastTimeWent = newTimeWent;
            return func.apply(null, arguments);
        } else {
            if (freshArguments === null)
                setTimeout(executeLater, minInterval-(newTimeWent-lastTimeWent));
            freshArguments = arguments;
            if (typeof alternateFunc === "function")
                return alternateFunc.apply(null, arguments);
        }
    };
}

Then, to wrap this throttle function around EventTarget for things like DOM clicks, window events, XMLHttpRequests onprogress, FileReader onprogress, [etc.], like so:

var tfCache = []; // throttled functions cache
function listen(source, eventName, func, _opts){
    var i = 0, Len = tfCache.length, cF = null, options = _opts || {};
    a: {
        for (; i < Len; i += 4)
            if (tfCache[i] === func &&
              tfCache[i+1] === (options.ALTERNATE||null) &&
              tfCache[i+2] === (options.INTERVAL||200)
            ) break a;
        cF = throttle(func, options.ALTERNATE||null, options.INTERVAL||200);
        tfCache.push(func, options.ALTERNATE||null, options.INTERVAL||200, cF);
    }
    source.addEventListener(eventName, cF || tfCache[i+3], _opts);
    return cF === null; // return whether it used the cache or not
};
function mute(source, eventName, func, _opts){
    var options = _opts || {};
    for (var i = 0, Len = tfCache.length; i < Len; i += 4)
        if (tfCache[i] === func &&
          tfCache[i+1] === (options.ALTERNATE||null) &&
          tfCache[i+2] === (options.INTERVAL||200)
        ) {
            source.removeEventListener(eventName, tfCache[i+3], options);
            return true;
        }
    return false;
}

Below is an example of a button throttled to listening for a click only once every second. When it receives this click, it changes to a new random color.

(function(){"use strict";
// The function throttler //
var timenow=self.performance ? performance.now.bind(performance) : Date.now;
function throttle(func, alternateFunc, minInterval) {
    var lastTimeWent = -minInterval, freshArguments=null;
    function executeLater(){
        func.apply(null, freshArguments);
        freshArguments = null;
        lastTimeWent = 0;
    }
    return function() {
        var newTimeWent = timenow();
        if ((newTimeWent-lastTimeWent) > minInterval) {
            lastTimeWent = newTimeWent;
            return func.apply(null, arguments);
        } else {
            if (freshArguments === null)
                setTimeout(executeLater,minInterval-(newTimeWent-lastTimeWent));
            freshArguments = arguments;
            if (typeof alternateFunc === "function")
                return alternateFunc.apply(this, arguments);
        }
    };
}
// The EventTarget wrapper: //
var tfCache = []; // throttled functions cache
function listen(source, eventName, func, _opts){
    var i = 0, Len = tfCache.length, cF = null, options = _opts || {};
    a: {
        for (; i < Len; i += 4)
            if (tfCache[i] === func &&
              tfCache[i+1] === (options.ALTERNATE||null) &&
              tfCache[i+2] === (options.INTERVAL||200)
            ) break a;
        cF = throttle(func, options.ALTERNATE||null, options.INTERVAL||200);
        tfCache.push(func, options.ALTERNATE||null, options.INTERVAL||200, cF);
    }
    source.addEventListener(eventName, cF || tfCache[i+3], _opts);
    return cF === null; // return whether it used the cache or not
};
function mute(source, eventName, func, _opts){
    var options = _opts || {};
    for (var i = 0, Len = tfCache.length; i < Len; i += 4)
        if (tfCache[i] === func &&
          tfCache[i+1] === (options.ALTERNATE||null) &&
          tfCache[i+2] === (options.INTERVAL||200)
        ) {
            source.removeEventListener(eventName, tfCache[i+3], options);
            return true;
        }
    return false;
}
// Finally, the color changing button: //
function randHex(){ // weighted towards the ends of the scales for contrast
    var rand = Math.random()*2 - 1; // equally offcenter it from one
    var sign = rand < 0 ? -1 : 1; // get a sign-ish value
    rand = Math.sqrt(rand * sign) * sign; // stretch it further from zero
    rand = 128 + rand * 128; // next, recenter it to range from 0 to 255 
    var str = (rand | 0).toString(16); // make an integer string
    while (str.length < 2) str = "0" + str; // pad it
    return str; // finally, return it
}
var clickerEle = document.getElementById("clicker");
var dropperEle = document.getElementById("droppedClicks");
var deDs = dropperEle.dataset; // deDs = droperEle DataSet
var dropSkips = 0;
function whenClick(){
    if (dropSkips > 10) { // if the user clicked fast enough
        mute(clickerEle, "click", whenClick, theOptions);
        dropperEle.textContent = "You won with " + dropSkips + 
            " clicks per second! The button no longer changes color";
    }
    dropSkips = 0;
    deDs ? delete deDs.numdrops : dropperEle.removeAttribute("data-numdrops");
    clickerEle.setAttribute("style", "background:#"+randHex()+randHex()+randHex());
}
var theOptions = {
    ALTERNATE: function(){
        // whenever the main function is skipped:
        deDs.numdrops = dropSkips += 1;
    },
    INTERVAL: 2000,
    passive: true
};
listen(clickerEle, "click", whenClick, theOptions);
whenClick(); // to start changing the color
document.body.addEventListener("contextmenu", function(x){x.preventDefault()});
})();
#droppedClicks[data-numdrops]::before {
    content: "Dropped " attr(data-numdrops) " clicks";
    color: green;
}
Click the button below as fast as you can! You win when you are able to click the button more than ten times in a single second ().<br />
<br />
<button id="clicker"><h3>Click me</h3></button>
<div id="droppedClicks"></div>

After saving this answer, I discovered that the toxic SO communitys' persistent downvotes prevent this snippet from running. Therefore, here is a link to a JSFiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/t7ymkzLx/2/

By default, this throttles the function to at most one call every 200ms. To change the interval to a different number of milliseconds, then pass a the optionsObject.INTERVAL option in the options argument and set it to the desired minimum milliseconds between executions. (Since timers are not always the most precise,) If you have an exact minimum interval desired, then I would recommend that you subtract one or two from desired optionsObject.INTERVAL to ensure that it always gets executed at least when it should. If you need to do something to the arguments to the throttled func when the throttled function's execution is delayed (due to excess calls), then use the optionsObject.ALTERNATE option. This "ALTERNATE" is a function that gets called immediately in place of the primary function whenever the call to the primary function is dropped. For example, if you are using your throttled function on an EventTarget, but want to preventDefault() on dropped events, then use {ALTERNATE: function(evt){ evt.preventDefault(); }} for the options object.

  • 1
    Omg... all these nested code and switch cases... And tilde operator minus one... – Victor Schröder Jul 19 at 18:08
  • This is the least helpful code I saw, and worst in readability – Nishchal Gautam Sep 11 at 1:36
  • Not a best solution at all. – sultan aslam Sep 15 at 7:08
  • can someone explain why he/she are using tilde operator like this? it thought it was just for bit manipulation logic – baku Oct 7 at 1:44
  • The tide operator is used in the clever sequence to turn -1 into zero (a falsey value) is then compared against using || to correctly return cached listeners. – Jack Giffin Oct 12 at 10:57

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