0

In the first part I am creating pairs out of array elements and the array is twice as short. The array is always even.

Here is the first part:

using System;

class Program
{
static void Main()
{
    int[] Arr = new int[]{1, 2, 0, 3, 4, -1};
    int[] newArr = new int[(Arr.Length / 2)];

    int sum = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < Arr.Length; i+=2)
    {
        if (i + 1 < Arr.Length)
        {
            newArr[sum] = Arr[i] + Arr[i + 1];
        }
        else
        {
            newArr[sum] = Arr[i];
        }
        sum++;
    }

in the second part I would like to check if the array elements are equal. What I want to do is to increment int counter each time the index in the for loop is equal to the next index in the array.

What I have as second part:

int counter = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < newArr.Length -1; i++)
    {
        if (newArr[i] == newArr[i + 1])
        {
            counter++;
        }
        else
        {
            Console.Write(" ");
        }
    }

What is wrong in this code. I cannot seem to understand how to write code that will work with int Arr[5] and int Arr[5000]

  • 1
    i < newArr.Length - 1 – Ulugbek Umirov Apr 17 '14 at 8:45
  • now I understand the exception that I get in Visual Studio – Henry Lynx Apr 17 '14 at 8:49
  • 1
    it will crash at newArr[i + 1] when i is equal to newArr.Length - 1, you should iterate from 0 to < newArr.Length-1 – Andrew Apr 17 '14 at 8:49
  • 1
    If you can use linq, shortest way to check if all array elements are equal is to write newArr.All(a => a == newArr[0]); – Alexander Apr 17 '14 at 8:58
1

All you need to change is the termination condition in the for loop to

i < newArr.Length - 1

so that you can compare array[i] with array[i + 1]. This change makes sure you do not get past the upper bound of the array.

1

try this

for ( i=1;i<arr.Length;i++)
{
    if(arr[0]==arr[i])
    continue;

    else
    break;
}
if (i==arr.Length)
Console.WriteLine("All element in array are equal");
0

If there is no need to write so imperative code, other than to achieve your final goal – you don't have to. Almost always you can do it in a much more readable way.

I suggest using LINQ. For collections implementing IEnumerable<T>:

newArr.Distinct().Take(2).Count() == 1

LINQ is a built-in feature, just make sure you are using System.Linq; at the top of your .cs file.

What goes on here?

  • Distinct returns an IEnumerable<T>, its enumeration will give all distinct elements from your array, but no enumeration, and hence computation, happened yet.
  • Take returns new IEnumerable<T>, its enumeration will enumerate previous IEnumerable<T> internally, but it will give only first two distinct elements. Again, no enumeration happened yet.
  • At last, Count enumerates the last IEnumerable<T> and returns its elements count (in our case 0, 1 or 2).
  • As we used Take(2), the enumeration initiated by Count method will be stopped right when the second distinct element is found. If we don't use Take(2), our code will enumerate the whole array even if it is not needed.

Why is this approach better?

  • Much shorter and more readable;
  • Lazy evaluation – if an element is found out to be distinct from the other ones, the enumeration will be stopped immediately;
  • Flexible – you can pass a custom equality comparer to Distinct method. You can also call Select method before calling Distinct to choose what specific member your elements will be compared by;
  • Universal – Works with any collection which impletents IEnumerable<T> interface.

Other ways

The same result can be achieved in slightly other ways, for example:

!newArr.Distinct().Take(2).Skip(1).Any()

Experiment with LINQ and choose the way you and your team consider the most readable.

For collections implementing IList<T> you can also write (as @Alexander suggested):

newArr.All(x => x == newArr[0])

This variant is shorter but not as flexible and universal.


OFF TOPIC. Encapsulating common code

You should encapsulate code that does one simple thing into a separate method, it further improves your code readability and allows reusing your method in several places. I'd write an extension method for this one.

public static class CollectionExtensions {
    public static bool AllElementsEqual<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items) {
        return items.Distinct().Take(2).Count() == 1;
    }
}

Later in your code you need just to call this method:

newArr.AllElementsEqual()
-2

Try this..

for (int i = 0; i < newArr.Length-1; i++)
{
 for(int j=0 ;j< newArr.Length-1; i++)
      {
      if (newArr[i] == newArr[j])
       {
            /////
        }
       }

    }
    else
    {
        Console.Write(" ");
    }
}
  • 5
    1. you never compare last element with others; 2. what's the point in conversion of O(n) operation to O(n^2)? – Ulugbek Umirov Apr 17 '14 at 8:55

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