136

How can I test if a variable is an array of string in TypeScript? Something like this:

function f(): string {
    var a: string[] = ["A", "B", "C"];

    if (typeof a === "string[]")    {
        return "Yes"
    }
    else {
        // returns no as it's 'object'
        return "No"
    }
};

TypeScript.io here: http://typescript.io/k0ZiJzso0Qg/2

Edit: I've updated the text to ask for a test for string[]. This was only in the code example previously.

2
215

You cannot test for string[] in the general case but you can test for Array quite easily the same as in JavaScript https://stackoverflow.com/a/767492/390330 (I prefer Array.isArray(value)).

If you specifically want for string array you can do something like:

if (Array.isArray(value)) {
   var somethingIsNotString = false;
   value.forEach(function(item){
      if(typeof item !== 'string'){
         somethingIsNotString = true;
      }
   })
   if(!somethingIsNotString && value.length > 0){
      console.log('string[]!');
   }
}
4
  • 2
    instanceof Array fails when checking arrays across frames. Prefer Array.isArray: twitter.com/mgechev/status/1292709820873748480
    – axmrnv
    Aug 12 '20 at 19:24
  • @axmrnv Completely agree 🌹
    – basarat
    Aug 13 '20 at 1:31
  • also, you can break the loop right after telling that somethingIsNotString. With your code, it will necessarily loop through all entire array, which is not necessary.
    – Kukuster
    Oct 12 '20 at 15:12
  • @Kukuster value.some() coul be used then, but the answer is related to how to determine array/not-array not about anything else Aug 23 at 15:04
65

Another option is Array.isArray()

if(! Array.isArray(classNames) ){
    classNames = [classNames]
}
4
  • 8
    But this doesn't check for the elements being of type string.
    – User
    Jan 8 '19 at 11:13
  • 6
    Yeap. Then you need one additional checking. Array.isArray(classNames) && classNames.every(it => typeof it === 'string')
    – grigson
    Jan 9 '19 at 15:21
  • @grigson how about performance when checking 400+ results? Should I disconsider this kind of type check, check just the first child or is it safe tu use this "every" thing? Jan 17 '19 at 11:35
  • 1
    @giovannipds Please check asmironov's answer.
    – Dinei
    May 8 '19 at 15:03
29

Here is the most concise solution so far:

function isArrayOfStrings(value: any): boolean {
   return Array.isArray(value) && value.every(item => typeof item === "string");
}

Note that value.every will return true for an empty array. If you need to return false for an empty array, you should add value.length to the condition clause:

function isNonEmptyArrayOfStrings(value: any): boolean {
    return Array.isArray(value) && value.length && value.every(item => typeof item === "string");
}

There is no any run-time type information in TypeScript (and there won't be, see TypeScript Design Goals > Non goals, 5), so there is no way to get the type of an empty array. For a non-empty array all you can do is to check the type of its items, one by one.

3
  • Please note if an Array is empty you need to check that value.length>0 and not just value.length as this will return 0
    – markyph
    Feb 25 at 9:13
  • @markyph, 0 is a falsy value in JS/TS and is interpreted as false in this context.
    – axmrnv
    Feb 25 at 12:27
  • Yes am aware 0 is falsy - but the above broke my test as expected it to be "false" but returned 0 - value.length>0 guarantees it to be false
    – markyph
    Feb 26 at 13:43
7

I know this has been answered, but TypeScript introduced type guards: https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/advanced-types.html#typeof-type-guards

If you have a type like: Object[] | string[] and what to do something conditionally based on what type it is - you can use this type guarding:

function isStringArray(value: any): value is string[] {
  if (value instanceof Array) {
    value.forEach(function(item) { // maybe only check first value?
      if (typeof item !== 'string') {
        return false
      }
    })
    return true
  }
  return false
}

function join<T>(value: string[] | T[]) {
  if (isStringArray(value)) {
    return value.join(',') // value is string[] here
  } else {
    return value.map((x) => x.toString()).join(',') // value is T[] here
  }
}

There is an issue with an empty array being typed as string[], but that might be okay

1
  • 11
    The return false in the forEach has no effect.
    – Ishtar
    May 9 '18 at 8:39
5

Try this:

if (value instanceof Array) {
alert('value is Array!');
} else {
alert('Not an array');
}
2
  • 7
    Rather than copying another answer, please just point out the duplicate as a comment, especially as this doesn't work in all cases. Apr 17 '14 at 10:49
  • This just check the main type not every Array's child. Jan 17 '19 at 11:39
5

You can have do it easily using Array.prototype.some() as below.

const isStringArray = (test: any[]): boolean => {
 return Array.isArray(test) && !test.some((value) => typeof value !== 'string')
}
const myArray = ["A", "B", "C"]
console.log(isStringArray(myArray)) // will be log true if string array

I believe this approach is better that others. That is why I am posting this answer.

Update on Sebastian Vittersø's comment

Here you can use Array.prototype.every() as well.

const isStringArray = (test: any[]): boolean => {
 return Array.isArray(test) && test.every((value) => typeof value === 'string')
}
2
  • 1
    Instead of using negation in two places here, you could do: test.every(value => typeof value === 'string')
    – Sebastian
    Jul 24 '20 at 9:15
  • 1
    @SebastianVittersø Thanks for the NICE suggestion. I updated my answer. Jul 24 '20 at 9:31
0

there is a little problem here because the

if (typeof item !== 'string') {
    return false
}

will not stop the foreach. So the function will return true even if the array does contain none string values.

This seems to wok for me:

function isStringArray(value: any): value is number[] {
  if (Object.prototype.toString.call(value) === '[object Array]') {
     if (value.length < 1) {
       return false;
     } else {
       return value.every((d: any) => typeof d === 'string');
     }
  }
  return false;
}

Greetings, Hans

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