3

Can anybody help me programming the next problem (taken from Codingbat- Recursion1- count7)

Given a non-negative int n, return the count of the occurrences of 7 as a digit, so for example 717 yields 2. (no loops). Note that mod (%) by 10 yields the rightmost digit (126 % 10 is 6), while divide (/) by 10 removes the rightmost digit (126 / 10 is 12).

count7(717) → 2
count7(7) → 1
count7(123) → 0

There are some solutions which includes number of "returns". I would like to program the problem with only 1 "return".

  • This problem from codingBat comes from codingBat's JAVA section, please add JAVA as a tag. – Anirudh Oct 27 '14 at 11:19
  • Please post whatever code you have so far. Asking for the complete answer while progressing through a learning website is counter productive – Rob Oct 27 '14 at 11:21

10 Answers 10

2
public int count7(int n) {
  int counter = 0;

  if( n % 10 == 7) counter++;

  if( n / 10  == 0)  return counter;

  return counter + count7(n/10); 
}
  • OP specified they wanted a solution with one return, yours has two. – Shawn Mehan Jun 10 '17 at 14:56
5

Well here's the solution I wrote and let's see how to do it with only one return

public int count7(int n) 
{
    int c = 0;
    if (7 > n)
    {
        return 0;
    }
    else
    {
        if ( 7 == n % 10)
        {
            c = 1;
        }
        else
        {
            c = 0;
        }
    }
    return c + count7(n / 10);  
}

the same with only one return

public int count7(int n) 
{
    return (7 > n) ? 0 : ( ( 7 == n % 10) ? 1 + count7(n / 10) : 0 + count7(n / 10));  
}
1

Sure PFB my solution in JAVA for the same

public int count7(int n) {
   if((n / 10 == 0) && !(n % 10 == 7))      //First BASE CASE when the left most digit is 7 return 1
       return 0;     
   else if((n / 10 == 0) && (n % 10 == 7)) //Second BASE CASE when the left most digit is 7 return 0
        return 1;
   else if((n % 10 == 7))   
   //if the number having 2 digits then test the rightmost digit and trigger recursion trimming it there      
       return 1 + count7(n / 10);
   return count7(n / 10);
}
1
public int count7(int n) { 

  if(n == 0)
      return 0;
  else{
     if(n%10 ==7)
         return 1+count7(n/10);

     return 0+count7(n/10);  
  }
}
1
public static int count7(int n){
        if(n == 7)
            return 1;
        else if(n > 9){
            int a = count7(n%10);
            int b = count7(n/10);
            return a + b;
        }else
            return 0;
}
  • The statement count7(n % 10) would catch the number 7. You wouldn't need the first if statement that checks to see if n == 7. – Ungeheuer Nov 19 '16 at 3:23
1
public int count7(int n) 
{  
 if(n==0)return 0;
 if(n%10==7)return 1+count7(n/10);
 else return count7(n/10);
}
1
public int count7(int n) {
  if (n != 7 && n < 10) return 0;
  else if (n == 7) return 1;
  else if (n%10 == 7) return count7(n/10) + 1 ;
  else return count7(n/10);
}
  • maybe you can add some more explanation? So the other can also understand and not only copy paste? – kabaehr Sep 4 '16 at 10:02
  • Hi, welcome to stackoverflow. Please describe the answers more. Giving a complete answer will help other people to understand your answer. – Ashkan Sirous Sep 4 '16 at 10:15
  • I apologize for my incomplete answer. Don't worry, next time I will add more explanations about my answer. Thank you for informing me. – mark jerome lava Sep 4 '16 at 10:54
1
public int count7(int n){
    if(n < 7)
        return 0;
    else if(n % 10 == 7)
        return 1 + count7(n / 10);
    else
        return count7(n / 10);
}

the first if-statement is the base case that we would want to terminate on. The second checks to see if the rightmost digit is 7. If it is, chop the rightmost digit off and try again. When the recursive calls terminate and and values start getting returned up the chain, add 1 to include this successful check. In the case that neither of the above statements are true, chop off the rightmost digit and try again.

I know this is 2 years old, but hope this is a bit more readable and intuitive, and thus helpful.

0

Using one return will likely make it harder to read. If you are counting occurrences in recursion, an easy formula is to create a base case to terminate on, then provide an incremental return, and finally a return that will aid in reaching the base case without incrementing. For example..

public int count7(int n) {
  if(n == 0) return 0;
  if(n % 10 == 7) return 1 + count7(n / 10);
  return count7(n / 10);
}

Using a one liner return like the one below in my opinion is harder to read or update because of the double ternary..

public int count7(int n) 
{
    return (n == 0) ? 0 : (n % 10 == 7) ? 1 + count7(n / 10) : count7(n / 10);  
}
0

My solution works backwards from the nth digit to the first digit, by taking the modulus of the input. we add the number of sevens found into the return, for the final output.

Then checking whether the input is less than 7 can be the next step. If the input is less than 7 then there have never been any 7s in the input to begin with.

public int count7(int n) {
        int sevens_found = 0;
        if( n % 10 == 7 ) sevens_found ++;
            return ( n < 7) ? 0 : ( n % 10 == 7 ) ? sevens_found + count7 ( n / 10 ) : count7 ( n / 10 );
        }

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