37

I had such method:

public async Task<MyResult> GetResult()
{
    MyResult result = new MyResult();

    foreach(var method in Methods)
    {
        string json = await Process(method);

        result.Prop1 = PopulateProp1(json);
        result.Prop2 = PopulateProp2(json);

    }

    return result;
}

Then I decided to use Parallel.ForEach:

public async Task<MyResult> GetResult()
{
    MyResult result = new MyResult();

    Parallel.ForEach(Methods, async method =>
    {
        string json = await Process(method);    

        result.Prop1 = PopulateProp1(json);
        result.Prop2 = PopulateProp2(json);
    });

    return result;
}

But now I've got an error:

An asynchronous module or handler completed while an asynchronous operation was still pending.

  • Where are you getting this error? I'm assuming it's an exception, does it occur within GetResult? – Peter Ritchie Apr 17 '14 at 16:28
  • Is your Model actually a View Model and it implements INotifyPropertyChanged and is bound to the view? – Peter Ritchie Apr 17 '14 at 16:29
  • No it is not a view model, probably I have to change the name. It is just a simple class with a some props – sreginogemoh Apr 17 '14 at 16:36
  • getting exception on return return result; – sreginogemoh Apr 17 '14 at 16:54
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of Nesting await in Parallel.ForEach – Vitaliy Ulantikov Dec 2 '17 at 20:58
63

async doesn't work well with ForEach. In particular, your async lambda is being converted to an async void method. There are a number of reasons to avoid async void (as I describe in an MSDN article); one of them is that you can't easily detect when the async lambda has completed. ASP.NET will see your code return without completing the async void method and (appropriately) throw an exception.

What you probably want to do is process the data concurrently, just not in parallel. Parallel code should almost never be used on ASP.NET. Here's what the code would look like with asynchronous concurrent processing:

public async Task<MyResult> GetResult()
{
  MyResult result = new MyResult();

  var tasks = Methods.Select(method => ProcessAsync(method)).ToArray();
  string[] json = await Task.WhenAll(tasks);

  result.Prop1 = PopulateProp1(json[0]);
  ...

  return result;
}
  • 1
    Why shouldn't you use prallel in ASP.NET? – Dirk Boer Sep 29 '14 at 18:32
  • 15
    @DirkBoer: Parallel code will dramatically reduce ASP.NET scalability, and interfere with its thread pool heuristics. It is only useful if you have parallelizable CPU-bound work to do and know for certain that you will only have a small number of concurrent users. – Stephen Cleary Sep 29 '14 at 18:40
  • I got the exact same exception as the OP and though there appeared to be a minor improvement in the response for a single user when using Parallel, I can see how it (Parallel.ForEach) may hit us unexpectedly in a live application – Sudhanshu Mishra Dec 18 '14 at 10:27
  • @StephenCleary i've seen your comments around SO on using Parallel code on the server. What do you consider a small number of users exactly or do you have any further reading on this statement? I'm working on a WCF service but curious if this applies to me – Dude0001 Nov 28 '16 at 21:19
  • @Dude0001: It depends on a ton of factors - the only way to know for your situation is to run load tests. Simple rule of thumb: if you don't need to, then don't. "Fast enough" is fast enough. – Stephen Cleary Nov 28 '16 at 21:39
6

Alternatively, with the AsyncEnumerator NuGet Package you can do this:

using System.Collections.Async;

public async Task<MyResult> GetResult()
{
    MyResult result = new MyResult();

    await Methods.ParallelForEachAsync(async method =>
    {
        string json = await Process(method);    

        result.Prop1 = PopulateProp1(json);
        result.Prop2 = PopulateProp2(json);
    }, maxDegreeOfParallelism: 10);

    return result;
}

where ParallelForEachAsync is an extension method.

5

Ahh, okay. I think I know what's going on now. async method => an "async void" which is "fire and forget" (not recommended for anything other than event handlers). This means the caller cannot know when it is completed... So, GetResult returns while the operation is still running. Although the technical details of my first answer are incorrect, the result is the same here: that GetResult is returning while the operations started by ForEach are still running. The only thing you could really do is not await on Process (so that the lambda is no longer async) and wait for Process to complete each iteration. But, that will use at least one thread pool thread to do that and thus stress the pool slightly--likely making use of ForEach pointless. I would simply not use Parallel.ForEach...

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.