4

I wrote a simple if/else in my code which worked fine. Later I added another level of if under the first, and was baffled by its behavior. Here's very simple code to recreate the situation:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    boolean a = true;
    boolean b = false;

    if (a)
        if (b)
            System.out.println("a=true, b=true");
    else
        System.out.println("a=false");
}

It returns "a=false", even though a is true!

It turns out the else binds with the nearest if, although I have not found it documented anywhere, and eclipse does not highlight the mismatched indentation levels as an error (although it does correct it when formatting the file).

A very, very strong argument for using braces!

Where is the binding order of else/if documented?

And as a challenge,

Is there a way to make the above code do what the indentation makes you expect without adding braces?

  • one line of code don't need brace, else you need, otherwise how do you think it should work the way you expect. why would you think otherwise? your code in plain English tells to print a=false – spiderman Apr 17 '14 at 18:07
  • 1
    possible duplicate of Nested if-else behaviour without braces – devnull Apr 17 '14 at 18:13
  • 9
    Jesus Christ! Use braces!! – Matt Logan Apr 17 '14 at 18:13
  • Yes, use braces. This ain't python, not even jython. – devnull Apr 17 '14 at 18:14
  • In my defense I am not a Python coder (although very recently I started using it just to be hip like all you young guys with plaid shirts and beards), and I always use braces unless it's a one-liner, and most of the time even then. So I started with a one liner, which later grew an else, and later got the extra if. Yes, I should have added braces at that point. The unexpected behavior was unexpected because Eclipse has trained me out of careful thinking about every character the way we did in the old days on punch cards. – Jeff Snider Apr 17 '14 at 18:38
18

Is there a way to make the above code do what the indentation makes you expect without adding braces?

No. Because Java is not Python, and compiler doesn't work based on what's on your mind. That is why you should always use braces.

Clearly the else is a part of the inner if, and hence the result is expected. This is evident from JLS §14.5 - Statements

  • 8
    Because Java is not Python... A-ha! – devnull Apr 17 '14 at 18:08
  • This answer is incorrect, as demonstrated by the one from @Cruncher. – Jeff Snider Apr 17 '14 at 18:41
  • @JeffSnider Not sure what makes you think that anything mentioned in the answer is incorrect. Surely you could come up with pathological ways to avoid braces but it'd turn the code really unreadable. – devnull Apr 17 '14 at 19:11
  • 1
    If you want to get pedantic, another way to make the code work is to write it in Python. For the sake of clarity and convention I strongly recommend using braces. – Daniel Apr 17 '14 at 19:40
  • 1
    This answer should be marked as correct. – OptimusCrime Apr 19 '14 at 14:25
11

Is there a way to make the above code do what the indentation makes you expect without adding braces?

if (a)
    if (b)
        System.out.println("a=true, b=true");
    else;
else
    System.out.println("a=false");

else; will definitively finish the innermost if.

I would like to note that, if I ever came across this code in production, I would hunt through the commit logs until I found out who wrote it. This is absolutely an unacceptable thing to do. but it answers the quoted question

10

It is clearly stated in Language specification 14.5. Statements:

Java programming language suffers from the so-called "dangling else problem,

Statements are thus grammatically divided into two categories: those that might end in an if statement that has no else clause (a "short if statement") and those that definitely do not.

Only statements that definitely do not end in a short if statement may appear as an immediate substatement before the keyword else in an if statement that does have an else clause.

  • +1 for referencing the specification – Fabio Marcolini Apr 17 '14 at 18:17
4

It is documented in Section 14.5 of the Java Language Spec:

The problem is that both the outer if statement and the inner if statement might conceivably own the else clause. In this example, one might surmise that the programmer intended the else clause to belong to the outer if statement.

The Java programming language, like C and C++ and many programming languages before them, arbitrarily decrees that an else clause belongs to the innermost if to which it might possibly belong. This rule is captured by the following grammar:

4

Is there a way to make the above code do what the indentation makes you expect without adding braces?

I would go:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    boolean a = true;
    boolean b = false;

    if (!a)
        System.out.println("a=false");   
    else if(b)
        System.out.println("a=true, b=true");

}
1
public static void main(String[] args) {
    boolean a = true;
    boolean b = false;

    if (a && b)
        System.out.println("a=true, b=true");
    else if (!a)
        System.out.println("a=false");
}
  • This is strictly a less elegant version of @Liam's answer. – Cruncher Apr 21 '14 at 13:52
  • @Cruncher True, this is more clunky, however it made more sense in my head. – Lieuwe Rooijakkers Apr 21 '14 at 14:46
0

First and foremost, best advice is to always use braces!

Naturally, every else statement is attached to the nearest if-statement and this is evident from this link and this is why your code behaves this way. The compiler cares nothing about indentation.. You can write your entire code on one line, it'd still work as long as its syntactically correct.

Also, if you want the output you expected, nesting an if-statement inside another if-statement (with no else-statement) is a primitive practice; this can simply be done with the && operator like this:

if (a && b)
        System.out.println("a=true, b=true");
else
    System.out.println("a=false");

You'd have gotten your desired output. I hope this helps.. Merry coding!

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.