26

here is my problem in short

$ echo 'for i in $@; do echo arg: $i; done; echo DONE' > /tmp/test.sh
$ echo "ac\nbc\ncc\n" | xargs bash /tmp/test.sh 
arg: ac
arg: bc
arg: cc
DONE

Which is what i expect, but

$ echo "ac s\nbc s\ncc s\n" | xargs -d \n bash /tmp/test.sh
arg: ac
arg: s
arg: bc
arg: s
arg: cc
arg: s
DONE

Shouldn't the output be?

arg: ac s
arg: bc s
arg: cc s
DONE

How do I get the 2nd output with xargs?

25

Try:

printf %b 'ac s\nbc s\ncc s\n' | xargs -d '\n' bash /tmp/test.sh

You neglected to quote the \n passed to -d, which means that just n rather than \n was passed to xargs as the delimiter - the shell "ate" the \ (when the shell parses an unquoted string, \ functions as an escape character; if an ordinary character follows the \ - n in this case - only that ordinary character is used).

Also heed @glenn jackman's advice to double-quote the $@ inside the script (or omit the in "$@" part altogether).

Also: xargs -d is a GNU extension, which, for instance, won't work on FreeBSD/macOS. To make it work there, see @glenn jackman's xargs -0-based solution.


Note that I'm using printf rather than echo to ensure that the \n instances in the string are interpreted as newlines in all Bourne-like shells:
In bash and ksh[1], echo defaults to NOT interpreting \-based escape sequences (you have to use -e to achieve that) - unlike in zsh and strictly POSIX-compliant shells such as dash.
Therefore, printf is the more portable choice.

[1] According to the manual, ksh's echo builtin exhibits the same behavior as the host platform's external echo utility; while this may vary across platforms, the Linux and BSD/macOS implementations do not interpret \ escape sequences by default.

3
  • note- new line is not always \n . for windows it is \r\n – Paramvir Singh Karwal Jul 15 '19 at 7:24
  • @ParamvirSinghKarwal: Yes, but note that the question is tagged unix. – mklement0 Jul 15 '19 at 11:35
  • just in case someone is fiddling with windows style files in unix environment. – Paramvir Singh Karwal Jul 18 '19 at 10:05
11

On Mac OSX

For simple cases that have a known number of args, tell xargs how many args to send to each command. For example

$ echo "1\n2\n3" | xargs -n1 echo "#"
# 1
# 2
# 3

When your input args are complex, and newline terminated, a better method is:

$ echo "1\n2 3\n4 5 6" | xargs -L1 echo  "#"
# 1
# 2 3
# 4 5 6

There is a probem here, can you see it? What if our input line contains a single quote:

$ echo "1\n2 3\n4 '5 6" | xargs -L1 echo  "#"
# 1
# 2 3
xargs: unterminated quote

xargs does not like single quotes unless you use the -0 flag. But -0 and -L1 are not compatible, so that leaves us with:

$ echo "1\n2 3\n4 '5 6" | tr '\n' '\0' | xargs -0 -I{} echo "#" {}
# 1
# 2 3
# 4 '5 6

If you brew install findutils we can do a little better:

$ echo "1\n2 3\n4 '5 6" | gxargs -d\\n -i echo "#" {}
# 1
# 2 3
# 4 '5 6

But wait, maybe using xargs is just a bad tool for this one. What if we use the shell builtins instead:

$ echo "1\n2 3\n4 '5 6" | while read -r; do echo "# $REPLY"; done
# 1
# 2 3
# 4 '5 6

For some more thoughts about xargs vs while checkout this question.

1
7

Your shell script needs to use "$@" not $@

See http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bashref.html#Special-Parameters


I see in the xargs manual on my machine:

xargs reads items from the standard input, delimited by blanks [...] or newlines

(emphasis mine)

Thus:

$ echo $'ac s\nbc s\ncc s\n' | xargs bash /tmp/test.sh  
arg: ac
arg: s
arg: bc
arg: s
arg: cc
arg: s
DONE

$ printf "%s\0" "ac s" "bc s" "cc s" | xargs -0 bash /tmp/test.sh
arg: ac s
arg: bc s
arg: cc s
DONE

With the former, you get the equivalent of

bash /tmp/test.sh ac s bc s cc s

versus using null-separator

bash /tmp/test.sh "ac s" "bc s" "cc s"

You need to be clear about what the delimiter is with xargs when the data contains whitespace.

$ printf "%s\n" "ac s" "bc s" "cc s" | xargs -d $'\n' bash /tmp/test.sh
arg: ac s
arg: bc s
arg: cc s
DONE

$ echo $'ac s\nbc s\ncc s\n' | xargs -d $'\n' bash /tmp/test.sh  
arg: ac s
arg: bc s
arg: cc s
arg:  
DONE

Note the extra arg in the last case, echo already adds a newline, so you don't need an extra one unless you use echo -n

2
  • 1
    Good advice, though the real problem lies with not quoting the \n passed to -d. – mklement0 Apr 17 '14 at 20:47
  • 1
    You're absolutely right: both issues need to be addressed to fix the problem (and they each in isolation or combination produce the symptom). Your printf-\0-xargs -0 solution is a nice alternative, because it is more portable (will work on OSX too, for instance, where xargs -d is not available). – mklement0 Apr 17 '14 at 21:01

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