8

My application has a personal keystore containing trusted self-signed certificates for use in the local network - say mykeystore.jks. I wish to be able to connect to public sites(say google.com) as well as ones in my local network using self-signed certificates which have been provisioned locally.

The problem here is that, when I connect to https://google.com, path building fails, because setting my own keystore overrides the default keystore containing root CAs bundled with the JRE, reporting the exception

sun.security.validator.ValidatorException: PKIX path building failed: sun.security.provider.certpath.SunCertPathBuilderException: unable to find valid certification path to requested target

However, if I import a CA certificate into my own keystore(mykeystore.jks) it works fine. Is there a way to support both?

I have my own TrustManger for this purpose,

public class CustomX509TrustManager implements X509TrustManager {

        X509TrustManager defaultTrustManager;

        public MyX509TrustManager(KeyStore keystore) {
                TrustManagerFactory trustMgrFactory = TrustManagerFactory.getInstance(TrustManagerFactory.getDefaultAlgorithm());
                trustMgrFactory.init(keystore);
                TrustManager trustManagers[] = trustMgrFactory.getTrustManagers();
                for (int i = 0; i < trustManagers.length; i++) {
                    if (trustManagers[i] instanceof X509TrustManager) {
                        defaultTrustManager = (X509TrustManager) trustManagers[i];
                        return;
                    }
                }

        public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] chain, String authType)
                throws CertificateException {
            try {
                defaultTrustManager.checkServerTrusted(chain, authType);
            } catch (CertificateException ce) {
            /* Handle untrusted certificates */
            }
        }
    }

I then initialize the SSLContext,

TrustManager[] trustManagers =
            new TrustManager[] { new CustomX509TrustManager(keystore) };
SSLContext customSSLContext =
        SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");
customSSLContext.init(null, trustManagers, null);

and set the socket factory,

HttpsURLConnection.setDefaultSSLSocketFactory(customSSLContext.getSocketFactory());

The main program,

URL targetServer = new URL(url);
HttpsURLConnection conn = (HttpsURLConnection) targetServer.openConnection();

If I don't set my own trust managers, it connects to https://google.com just fine. How do I get a "default trust manager" which points to the default key store?

14

In trustMgrFactory.init(keystore); you're configuring defaultTrustManager with your own personal keystore, not the system default keystore.

Based on reading the source code for sun.security.ssl.TrustManagerFactoryImpl, it looks like trustMgrFactory.init((KeyStore) null); would do exactly what you need (load the system default keystore), and based on quick testing, it seems to work for me.

  • 1
    I've tried it with Java 1.8 (build 1.8.0_60-b27). But it didn't work for me. I've got the same error: PKIX path building failed. – Sergey Vlasov Nov 26 '15 at 20:50
  • But this doesn't let you use your certs in a custom keystore, only the CA certs installed on the system. – Hugh Jeffner Mar 2 '16 at 22:17
  • Kudos for figuring this out by reading source! This simplifies a lot of cacerts path and name handling jugglery! Also amazes me that there is no password requirement for it too. – FUD Mar 3 '17 at 5:07
  • works for me openjdk version "1.8.0_151" – Yu Jiaao Feb 28 '18 at 1:17
8

The answer here is how I came to understand how to do this. If you just want to accept the system CA certs plus a custom keystore of certs I simplified it into a single class with some convenience methods. Full code available here:

https://gist.github.com/HughJeffner/6eac419b18c6001aeadb

KeyStore keystore; // Get your own keystore here
SSLContext sslContext = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");
TrustManager[] tm = CompositeX509TrustManager.getTrustManagers(keystore);
sslContext.init(null, tm, null);
  • 2
    Composite trust manager is a really helpful solution. – Kane Dec 27 '16 at 7:44
2

I've run into the same issue with Commons HttpClient. Working solution for my case was to create delegation chain for PKIX TrustManagers in following way:

public class TrustManagerDelegate implements X509TrustManager {
    private final X509TrustManager mainTrustManager;
    private final X509TrustManager trustManager;
    private final TrustStrategy trustStrategy;

    public TrustManagerDelegate(X509TrustManager mainTrustManager, X509TrustManager trustManager, TrustStrategy trustStrategy) {
        this.mainTrustManager = mainTrustManager;
        this.trustManager = trustManager;
        this.trustStrategy = trustStrategy;
    }

    @Override
    public void checkClientTrusted(
            final X509Certificate[] chain, final String authType) throws CertificateException {
        this.trustManager.checkClientTrusted(chain, authType);
    }

    @Override
    public void checkServerTrusted(
            final X509Certificate[] chain, final String authType) throws CertificateException {
        if (!this.trustStrategy.isTrusted(chain, authType)) {
            try {
                mainTrustManager.checkServerTrusted(chain, authType);
            } catch (CertificateException ex) {
                this.trustManager.checkServerTrusted(chain, authType);
            }
        }
    }

    @Override
    public X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
        return this.trustManager.getAcceptedIssuers();
    }

}

And initialize HttpClient in following way (yes it's ugly):

final SSLContext sslContext;
try {
    sslContext = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");
    final TrustManagerFactory javaDefaultTrustManager = TrustManagerFactory.getInstance(TrustManagerFactory.getDefaultAlgorithm());
    javaDefaultTrustManager.init((KeyStore)null);
    final TrustManagerFactory customCaTrustManager = TrustManagerFactory.getInstance(TrustManagerFactory.getDefaultAlgorithm());
    customCaTrustManager.init(getKeyStore());

    sslContext.init(
        null,
        new TrustManager[]{
            new TrustManagerDelegate(
                    (X509TrustManager)customCaTrustManager.getTrustManagers()[0],
                    (X509TrustManager)javaDefaultTrustManager.getTrustManagers()[0],
                    new TrustSelfSignedStrategy()
            )
        },
        secureRandom
    );

} catch (final NoSuchAlgorithmException ex) {
    throw new SSLInitializationException(ex.getMessage(), ex);
} catch (final KeyManagementException ex) {
    throw new SSLInitializationException(ex.getMessage(), ex);
}

SSLConnectionSocketFactory sslSocketFactory = new SSLConnectionSocketFactory(sslContext);

PoolingHttpClientConnectionManager cm = new PoolingHttpClientConnectionManager(
        RegistryBuilder.<ConnectionSocketFactory>create()
                .register("http", PlainConnectionSocketFactory.getSocketFactory())
                .register("https", sslSocketFactory)
                .build()
);
//maximum parallel requests is 500
cm.setMaxTotal(500);
cm.setDefaultMaxPerRoute(500);

CredentialsProvider cp = new BasicCredentialsProvider();
cp.setCredentials(
        new AuthScope(apiSettings.getIdcApiUrl(), 443),
        new UsernamePasswordCredentials(apiSettings.getAgencyId(), apiSettings.getAgencyPassword())
);

client = HttpClients.custom()
                    .setConnectionManager(cm)
                    .build();

In your case with simple HttpsURLConnection you may get by with simplified version of delegating class:

public class TrustManagerDelegate implements X509TrustManager {
    private final X509TrustManager mainTrustManager;
    private final X509TrustManager trustManager;

    public TrustManagerDelegate(X509TrustManager mainTrustManager, X509TrustManager trustManager) {
        this.mainTrustManager = mainTrustManager;
        this.trustManager = trustManager;
    }

    @Override
    public void checkClientTrusted(
            final X509Certificate[] chain, final String authType) throws CertificateException {
        this.trustManager.checkClientTrusted(chain, authType);
    }

    @Override
    public void checkServerTrusted(
            final X509Certificate[] chain, final String authType) throws CertificateException {
        try {
            mainTrustManager.checkServerTrusted(chain, authType);
        } catch (CertificateException ex) {
            this.trustManager.checkServerTrusted(chain, authType);
        }
    }

    @Override
    public X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
        return this.trustManager.getAcceptedIssuers();
    }

}
0

For Android developers, this can be much easier. In summary, you can add a xml res file to config your custom certs.

Step 1: open your manifest xml add an attribute.

<manifest ... >
    <application android:networkSecurityConfig="@xml/network_security_config"
                    ... >
        ...
    </application>
</manifest>

Step 2: Add network_security_config.xml to res/xml, config certs as you want.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<network-security-config>
    <base-config>
        <trust-anchors>
            <certificates src="@raw/extracas"/>
            <certificates src="system"/>
        </trust-anchors>
    </base-config>
</network-security-config>

Note: this xml can support many other usage, and this solution only works on api24+.

Official reference: here

-1

When you initialize an SSLContext you supply an array of TrustManagers. You supply two: a default one that uses the JRE truststore, and another one that uses yours. The delegation model s the wrong answer here.

  • Unfortunately, there is no way to get the default trust manager(that uses the JRE CAs) used by JSSE, only a socket factory. I could implement my own trust manager which searches for the JRE certs, but I don't think that is a clean solution, since it depends on the location of the JRE. – varrunr Apr 18 '14 at 20:29
  • 1
    Only the first instance of a particular key and/or trust manager implementation type in the array is used. (For example, only the first javax.net.ssl.X509KeyManager in the array will be used.) – Dale Nov 17 '14 at 21:24

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