8

I receive reports in which the data is ETL to the DB automatically. I extract and transform some of that data to load it somewhere else. One thing I need to do is a DATEDIFF but the year needs to be exact (i.e., 4.6 years instead of rounding up to five years.

The following is my script:

select *, DATEDIFF (yy, Begin_date, GETDATE()) AS 'Age in Years'
from Report_Stage;

The 'Age_In_Years' column is being rounded. How do I get the exact date in years?

  • 1
    If you just need one significant digit, try DATEDIFF (dd.. and divide by 365. This won't factor in leap years, though. – Paul Abbott Apr 18 '14 at 0:01
  • that would only make it off by like ,1 +-.1 correct? – Squ1rr3lz Apr 18 '14 at 0:03
  • its still rounding when I do it that way – Squ1rr3lz Apr 18 '14 at 0:05
  • 2
    Try dividing by 365.0 instead of 365, that will stop the implicit cast to an integer. – Paul Abbott Apr 18 '14 at 0:07
  • That did the trick. Thanks. – Squ1rr3lz Apr 18 '14 at 0:09
10

Have you tried getting the difference in months instead and then calculating the years that way? For example 30 months / 12 would be 2.5 years.

Edit: This SQL query contains several approaches to calculate the date difference:

SELECT CONVERT(date, GetDate() - 912) AS calcDate
      ,DATEDIFF(DAY, GetDate() - 912, GetDate()) diffDays
      ,DATEDIFF(DAY, GetDate() - 912, GetDate()) / 365.0 diffDaysCalc
      ,DATEDIFF(MONTH, GetDate() - 912, GetDate()) diffMonths
      ,DATEDIFF(MONTH, GetDate() - 912, GetDate()) / 12.0 diffMonthsCalc
      ,DATEDIFF(YEAR, GetDate() - 912, GetDate()) diffYears
  • The column is still rounding – Squ1rr3lz Apr 18 '14 at 0:06
  • @JeffOrris - ... so did it answer your question or not? Your acceptance implies one thing, but your comment another. It's likely truncating due to the math being performed solely as integers (ie, it should be / 12.0 to force floating-point math, as in comments on your question). @Fumbles - you need to be adding relevant code to answers such as this, or this should be closed. – Clockwork-Muse Apr 18 '14 at 2:45
  • Added code example to original answer. – FumblesWithCode Apr 18 '14 at 16:42
  • @FumblesWithCode it answered my question. – Squ1rr3lz Apr 18 '14 at 18:31
  • There is a rounding problem with DATEDIFF(MONTH, @start, @end) / 12.0 when both dates are on the same month and starting day is greater. – Shago Aug 7 '17 at 20:17
14

All datediff() does is compute the number of period boundaries crossed between to dates. For instance

datediff(yy,'31 Dec 2013','1 Jan 2014')

returns 1.

You'll get a more accurate result if you compute the difference between the two dates in days and divide by the mean length of a calendar year in days over a 400 year span (365.2425):

datediff(day,{start-date},{end-date},) / 365.2425

For instance,

select datediff(day,'1 Jan 2000' ,'18 April 2014') / 365.2425

return 14.29461248 — just round it to the desired precision.

  • I think this is really what's going on. Crossing boundaries is a different thing than rounding, though it may produce results that look like it rounded. – jinglesthula May 25 '18 at 19:47
4

I think that division by 365.2425 is not a good way to do this. No division can to this completely accurately (using 365.25 also has issues).

I know the following script calculates an accurate date difference (though might not be the most speedy way):

        declare @d1 datetime ,@d2 datetime
        --set your dates eg: 
        select @d1 = '1901-03-02'
        select @d2 = '2016-03-01'

        select DATEDIFF(yy, @d1, @d2) -
            CASE WHEN MONTH(@d2) < MONTH(@d1) THEN 1
                 WHEN MONTH(@d2) > MONTH(@d1) THEN 0
                 WHEN DAY(@d2) < DAY(@d1) THEN 1
                 ELSE 0 END

         -- = 114 years

For comparison:

         select datediff(day,@d1 ,@d2) / 365.2425
         -- = 115 years => wrong!

You might be able to calculate small ranges with division, but why take a chance??

The following script can help to test yeardiff functions (just swap cast(datediff(day,@d1,@d2) / 365.2425 as int) to whatever the function is):

   declare @d1 datetime set @d1 = '1900-01-01'

   while(@d1 < '2016-01-01')
   begin
    declare @d2 datetime set @d2 = '2016-04-01'

    while(@d2 >= '1900-01-01')
    begin
        if (@d1 <= @d2 and dateadd(YEAR,     cast(datediff(day,@d1,@d2) / 365.2425 as int)      , @d1) > @d2)
        begin
            select 'not a year!!', @d1, @d2, cast(datediff(day,@d1,@d2) / 365.2425 as int)
        end

        set @d2 = dateadd(day,-1,@d2)
    end

    set @d1 = dateadd(day,1,@d1)
  end
0

I have found a better solution. This makes the assumption that the first date is less than or equal to the second date.

declare @dateTable table (date1 datetime, date2 datetime)
insert into @dateTable 
    select '2017-12-31', '2018-01-02' union
    select '2017-01-03', '2018-01-02' union 
    select '2017-01-02', '2018-01-02' union
    select '2017-01-01', '2018-01-02' union
    select '2016-12-01', '2018-01-02' union
    select '2016-01-03', '2018-01-02' union
    select '2016-01-02', '2018-01-02' union
    select '2016-01-01', '2018-01-02' 
select date1, date2, 
        case when ((DATEPART(year, date1) < DATEPART(year, date2)) and 
                    ((DATEPART(month, date1) <= DATEPART(month, date2)) and 
(DATEPART(day, date1) <= DATEPART(day, date2)) ))
                    then DATEDIFF(year, date1, date2)
            when (DATEPART(year, date1) < DATEPART(year, date2))
                    then DATEDIFF(year, date1, date2) - 1
            when (DATEPART(year, date1) = DATEPART(year, date2))
                    then 0
        end [YearsOfService]
from @dateTable

date1                   date2                   YearsOfService
----------------------- ----------------------- --------------
2016-01-01 00:00:00.000 2018-01-02 00:00:00.000 2
2016-01-02 00:00:00.000 2018-01-02 00:00:00.000 2
2016-01-03 00:00:00.000 2018-01-02 00:00:00.000 1
2016-12-01 00:00:00.000 2018-01-02 00:00:00.000 1
2017-01-01 00:00:00.000 2018-01-02 00:00:00.000 1
2017-01-02 00:00:00.000 2018-01-02 00:00:00.000 1
2017-01-03 00:00:00.000 2018-01-02 00:00:00.000 0
2017-12-31 00:00:00.000 2018-01-02 00:00:00.000 0
  • Hello, how is it better than accepted answer? – Andy Theos Aug 24 '18 at 15:07

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