6

So i have following div in HTML. Now I was wondering is there a way to apply CSS to just first 2 <a> and different Css on 3rd <a>

<div id="contain">
    <div> 
        <a href="#" id="A">A</a>
        <a href="#" id="B">B</a>
        <a href="#" id="C">C</a>
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

#contain a {
    margin: 10px 20px 10px 20px;
    text-decoration: none;
    display: inline-block;
}

I want to apply above Css to only first 2 <a> in Div.

Thanks for help. :)

  • A suggestion, you can also use jsfiddle.net/mr_alien/W27es if a user is redundant to add classes to his HTML, solution is only better for this particular example, this has max compatibility without declaring classes in your HTML – Mr. Alien Apr 18 '14 at 6:33
  • Getting confused in so many great answers. :) So finally which do you think will be most useful across all possible condition. nth-of-type() or the above fiddle. Thanks:) – Richa Apr 18 '14 at 6:37
  • 1
    Each has their uniqueness, Milind's answer is suitable for the users who doesn't want to support older IE, the suggestion I gave you above is ideal when you want to support old version of IE but YOU DON NOT WANT TO DECLARE CLASSES YOURSELF, and Helpful (Username) answer is max compatible across browsers but you need to declare classes by yourself.. but the max optimum answer is by Milind – Mr. Alien Apr 18 '14 at 6:41
  • Thanks a lot. So finally i guess i will go with nth-of-type(). – Richa Apr 18 '14 at 6:45
  • Absolutely fine if you are not supporting vintage versions of Internet Explorer... – Mr. Alien Apr 18 '14 at 6:46
8

You should use nth-child() to target the first two elements...

#contain a:nth-child(-n+2){
    margin: 10px 20px 10px 20px;
    text-decoration: none;
    display: inline-block;
}

Demo

Update: using :nth-of-type()

 #contain a:nth-of-type(-n+2){
    margin: 10px 20px 10px 20px;
    text-decoration: none;
    display: inline-block;
    color:red;
 }

Demo

  • This should be perfect answer according to OP's requirement – Sai Avinash Apr 18 '14 at 6:22
  • 2
    Also, you can use nth-of-type() which is a better thing here, say if any dynamic element generates between the a tag, your selector will break... check this vs this (Second one with the nth-child fails) – Mr. Alien Apr 18 '14 at 6:22
  • 2
    @Mr.Alien thanks for explaining. I guess nth-of-type() would be best suited here. – Richa Apr 18 '14 at 6:28
3

You can use CSS classes, like so:

<div id="contain">
                    <div style="margin-top:15px;margin-bottom:15px;"> 
                    <a href="#"  id="A" class="specialLink">A</a>
                    <a href="#"  id="B" class="specialLink">B</a> 
                    <a href="#"  id="C">C</a>
         </div>           
</div>

Then, in your CSS, you do:

#contain a.specialLink {
    margin: 10px 20px 10px 20px;
    text-decoration: none;
    display: inline-block;
           }

The ".specialLink" part makes it so only elements with that class get that styling.

  • what if OP cannot change the HTML? – Mr. Alien Apr 18 '14 at 6:18
  • 1
    What in the question made you think the OP couoldn't change the HTML? If he can't, then one of the other answers will work excellently - css selectors are very broad, indeed. This looked like a fairly first-time css-user question to me, so I explained a fairly fundamental part of CSS - classes. – Helpful Apr 18 '14 at 6:21
  • 2
    I always go with maximum bad possibilities because I've seen many users forget to specify complete requirements and the next thing you get is that I cannot change my HTML, or they say is that even I can do this, what if I want to apply style to 99 elements and not the single one? Providing optimum answer will never harm anyone.. :) – Mr. Alien Apr 18 '14 at 6:25
  • 2
    An excellent standpoint to take. Again, considering the question (which appeared fairly new-to-css to me) I feel like classes are a fairly easy way to explain these - less likely for the OP to merely copy/paste blindly. But I can certainly respect more sophisticated answers involving more advanced selectors, too. You bring up an excellent point. – Helpful Apr 18 '14 at 6:27
  • Yea, as far as your answer goes, I've voted long way back, just for a reason that your answer has max compatibility as far as cross browser is concerned :) – Mr. Alien Apr 18 '14 at 6:28
1

The first line will apply css to first two a and last to last a tag

$('#contain').find('a').css('some property');
$('#contain').find('a:last').css('some property');
1

if you have to set css to some items use this code

$(document).ready(function() {
    var iterations = 0;
    var countOfItems = 2; // how many <a> you need to change
    $('div#contain').find('a').each(function(){
        $(this).css({ "margin":"10px 20px 10px 20px", "text-decoration":"none" , "display":"inline-block"});
        iterations ++;
        if(iterations == countOfItems)
            return false;
    });
});
  • I would not recommend solving this with Javascript when it can easily be solved with some simple CSS. – Josef Engelfrost Apr 18 '14 at 6:46
0

Just use ID selector:

#A { ... }

UPDATE:

You can use nth-child() of CSS3 like this:

#contain a:nth-child(number)
{
   css declarations;
}

Where the number is the index of element.

For more info about nth-child() please refer here.

  • I don't want to use id so was trying for some other way – Richa Apr 18 '14 at 6:16
0

U can try -

             <a href="#"  id="A" style="margin: 10px 20px 10px 20px; text-decoration: none; display: inline-block;">A</a>
             <a href="#"  id="B" style="margin: 10px 20px 10px 20px; text-decoration: none; display: inline-block;">B</a> 

             <a href="#"  id="C" style="different attributes which u want">C</a> 

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