26
votes

Possible Duplicates:
Difference between i++ and ++i in a loop?
Is there a difference between x++ and ++x in java?

hello, I've just started learning Java and now I'm into for loop statement. I don't understand how ++i i++ works in a for loop statement.

I mean how they work in mathematics operations like addition and subtraction. I hope some one will explain this to me.

marked as duplicate by dmckee, asveikau, Rob Hruska, akf, Prasoon Saurav Feb 23 '10 at 4:17

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55
votes

They both increment the number. ++i is equivalent to i = i + 1.

i++ and ++i are very similar but not exactly the same. Both increment the number, but ++i increments the number before the current expression is evaluted, whereas i++ increments the number after the expression is evaluated.

int i = 3;
int a = i++; // a = 3, i = 4
int b = ++a; // b = 4, a = 4
  • 14
    To answer the actual question, however, they're essentially identical within the context of typical for loop usage. – Amber Feb 23 '10 at 2:16
  • Point of pedantry: i = i + 1 is an expression with a value one more than the initial value of i, which would make it more like ++i. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 23 '10 at 2:48
44
votes

Here's a sample class:

public class Increment
{
    public static void main(String [] args)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < args.length; ++i)
        {
            System.out.println(args[i]);
        }
    }
}

If I disassemble this class using javap.exe I get this:

Compiled from "Increment.java"
public class Increment extends java.lang.Object{
public Increment();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
   0:   iconst_0
   1:   istore_1
   2:   iload_1
   3:   aload_0
   4:   arraylength
   5:   if_icmpge       23
   8:   getstatic       #2; //Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
   11:  aload_0
   12:  iload_1
   13:  aaload
   14:  invokevirtual   #3; //Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Ljava/lang/String;)V
   17:  iinc    1, 1
   20:  goto    2
   23:  return

}

If I change the loop so it uses i++ and disassemble again I get this:

Compiled from "Increment.java"
public class Increment extends java.lang.Object{
public Increment();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
   0:   iconst_0
   1:   istore_1
   2:   iload_1
   3:   aload_0
   4:   arraylength
   5:   if_icmpge       23
   8:   getstatic       #2; //Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
   11:  aload_0
   12:  iload_1
   13:  aaload
   14:  invokevirtual   #3; //Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Ljava/lang/String;)V
   17:  iinc    1, 1
   20:  goto    2
   23:  return

}

When I compare the two, TextPad tells me that the two are identical.

What this says is that from the point of view of the generated byte code there's no difference in a loop. In other contexts there is a difference between ++i and i++, but not for loops.

  • 9
    +1 for going the extra mile. – paxdiablo Feb 23 '10 at 2:57
  • It's not the loop that's doing it, it's the fact that it's not in a larger expression context. If your loop-end expression was more complicated, it might very well make a difference. – Carl Norum Feb 23 '10 at 18:56
  • I'll add more to the loop example and try again to see. – duffymo Feb 23 '10 at 23:12
  • Absolute +1 for this answer! ... Although it can makes difference in situation like: "for (int i = 0, int j = 0; i < args.length; j += ++i)" vs. "for (int i = 0, int j = 0; i < args.length; j += i++)" – BlondCode Oct 12 '16 at 14:09
21
votes

Both of them increase the variable i by one. It's like saying i = i + 1. The difference is subtle. If you're using it in a loop like this, there's no difference:

for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
}

for (int i = 0; i < 100; ++i) {
}

If you want to know the difference, look at this example:

int a = 0;
int b = a++; // b = 0; a = 1

a = 0;
b = ++a: // b = 1; a = 1

The idea is that ++a increments a and returns that value, while a++ returns a's value and then increments a.

7
votes

The way for loop is processed is as follows

1 First, initialization is performed (i=0)

2 the check is performed (i < n)

3 the code in the loop is executed.

4 the value is incremented

5 Repeat steps 2 - 4

This is the reason why, there is no difference between i++ and ++i in the for loop which has been used.

  • This was the answer that I was looking for. Thank you! – Chris Mar 24 '15 at 20:45
5
votes

The difference is that the post-increment operator i++ returns i as it was before incrementing, and the pre-increment operator ++i returns i as it is after incrementing. If you're asking about a typical for loop:

for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)

or

for (i = 0; i < 10; ++i)

They're exactly the same, since you're not using i++ or ++i as a part of a larger expression.

3
votes

Both i++ and ++i are short-hand for i = i + 1.

In addition to changing the value of i, they also return the value of i, either before adding one (i++) or after adding one (++i).

In a loop the third component is a piece of code that is executed after each iteration.

for (int i=0; i<10; i++)

The value of that part is not used, so the above is just the same as

for(int i=0; i<10; i = i+1)

or

for(int i=0; i<10; ++i)

Where it makes a difference (between i++ and ++i )is in these cases

while(i++ < 10)

for (int i=0; i++ < 10; )
  • See TomH's pedantry in David's answer, i=i+1 is identical to ++i, not i++ :-) – paxdiablo Feb 23 '10 at 2:56
0
votes

JLS§14.14.1, The basic for Statement, makes it clear that the ForUpdate expression(s) are evaluated and the value(s) are discarded. The effect is to make the two forms identical in the context of a for statement.

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