2

[Updated] I'm struggling with using an abstract class, here's my code (simple model):

class A{
  public:
    virtual ~A(void){};
    virtual void print() const = 0;
};

class B : public A{
  public:
    void print() const{cout << x << endl;}
  private:
    int x;
};

class C : public A{
  public:
    void print() const{cout << x << endl;}
  private:
    double x;
};

class X{
  public:
    X(void){
      array = new A * [20]; 
    }
    void Add(const A & src){
      array[someindex] = &src; //Fpermissive, cannot convert const A * to A *
    }; 
  private:
    A ** array; 
};

int main(int argc, char const *argv[]){
  X obj;
  obj.Add(B(9)); //B.x = 9
  obj.Add(C(3.3333)); // C.x = 3.3333

  return 0;
}

How can I store B and C in array in X? How can I make src non-const? Is it possible? Thanks for your reply. And I'm not able to modify main. I didn't want to make a method Add for parameters of class B or C...

Ok, the goal is, that I have to store objects B and C in X and I'm not able to modify the main function. Objects of B and C are having very similar methods.

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  • 1
    Despite its name, array is not an array. It is a pointer to pointer. You cannot expect it to work like an array just like that. – juanchopanza Apr 19 '14 at 22:03
  • are you seeing an error? give us an idea of what's happening... – pennstatephil Apr 19 '14 at 22:04
  • Nice of you to try saving the addresses of short-lived temporaries in your container. – Deduplicator Apr 19 '14 at 22:04
  • I'm allocating array as: array = new A * [size] An I'm not able to convert const parameter in non const in assign – marthin23 Apr 19 '14 at 22:07
  • you also need a virtual destructor in A – user3527357 Apr 19 '14 at 22:09
1

How can I store B and C in array in X?

You can't. You can only store pointers to them, and only after you have allocated space to store them.

How can I make src non-const?

Presumably, you were "forced" to add the const to the parameter declaration of X::Add() because you were passing in temporaries. You need to pass in the addresses of l-values.

void X::Add( A *src ) { array[someindex] = src; }

B   b(9);
X.Add( &b );
C   c(3.3333);
X.Add( &c ); 

Is it possible?

Yes, using const_cast<>, but that would have been a recipe for disaster in this case. Your fundamental problem was your attempt to store addresses of temporaries. When you do something like this:

X.Add(B(9)); // B will be destroyed when the execution of this statement ends.

what you will end up storing in your array, assuming you found a way to do that, would be a pointer to garbage.

UPDATE: Based on the exchange in the comments, it seems that you need to save copies of the const A& src items passed to the X::Add() method. Copying through a base class reference or pointer needs a virtual "clone()" method, whose specific purpose is to have the subclass implementation invoked at runtime.

class A {
...
virtual A* clone() const = 0;
...
};

class B : public A {
...
// Note signature: this works due to return type covariance
B* clone() const { return new B(*this); } 
...
};
// similarly for class C and others

// use it like this
class X {
...
void Add(const A & src){ array[someindex] = src.clone(); }
...
};

Of course, you will have to take care of freeing these objects when you're done.

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  • I can't modify the main function, so I have to make X.Add(B(9)) etc. So should I overload the Add method? – marthin23 Apr 19 '14 at 22:27
  • That depends on your requirements. If you need to do something with those temporaries later (i.e. after the Add() call returns) then your only option is to copy them. You will have to implement a virtual clone method to ensure that the correct subclass is being copied even while being referenced through the base class pointer. – arayq2 Apr 19 '14 at 22:36
  • Yes, I have to search through the records in array, print them, etc. So am I supposed to define for example operator = in class A and override it in B and C ? Then I will be able to make a copy of the temporary const parameter in method Add? – marthin23 Apr 19 '14 at 22:46
  • If you're going to store (and use) an array of pointers, then those pointers need to point to objects in permanent storage. How are you going to allocate the space for the copies? And, there again, for the correct subclass, when all you have is a base class reference or pointer? You need a virtual A* A::clone( A const& ) method, over-ridden in each subclass, e.g. B* B::clone( B const& b ) { return new B(b);} using the copy constructor and taking advantage of return type covariance. You may also need to use a smart pointer to take care of freeing the objects when you're done. – arayq2 Apr 19 '14 at 22:58
  • Your last comment looks very helpfull! Thanks. – marthin23 Apr 19 '14 at 23:05
0

When you create obj A ** is just a dabgling pointer pointing to nowhere because you need to initialize it. You can use shared pointers and vector that will allow you to store references to objects and avoid dealing with the delete

You can declare X this way

class X{
  public:
    void Add(const shared_ptr<A> & src){ array.push_back(src); };
  private:
    vector<shared_ptr<A>> array; 
};

This will allaow an arbitrary number of objects to be stored into the array and avoid dealing with arrays, which is simpler

You can use it this way

int main(int argc, char const *argv[]){
  X obj;
  shared_ptr<B> shrdB(new B(9));
  shared_ptr<C> shrdC(new C(3.3333));
  obj.Add(std::dynamic_pointer_cast<A>(shrdB));
  obj.Add(std::dynamic_pointer_cast<A>(shrdC));
  return 0;
}
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