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Is there a way in Pascal to write to the start of a file, without overwriting other data?

I have learnt Seek(F, 0);but this overwrites the first thing in the file.

  • To be precise, seek() itself does not overwrite anything, it just sets the current file operation pointer to the beginning of the file. – JensG Apr 20 '14 at 18:02
  • How large is the file. For large files your proposed solution has terribly performance characteristics. – David Heffernan Apr 20 '14 at 19:45
1

You may achieve your goal with the following algorithm:

  • Create temporary file;
  • Write your new data to this temporary file;
  • Read all data from target file and append them to temporary file;
  • Rename temporary file to target one;
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You cannot insert new data in front of existing data. Writing to the start/middle of a file always overwrites existing data, you cannot change that. Your only option is to create a new file, write your new data to it first, then append the contents of the existing file to the new file, then finally replace the existing file with the new file.

1

It is not possible to insert into a file. You can only overwrite or append. So if you want to do it yourself with a simple linear file then you need to re-write the entire file. If your file is large then this is rather unappealing.

One obvious way to solve your problem is to use a local database rather than writing your own file handling mechanisms. The database layer manages indexing for you so that you can avoid expensive entire file re-writes.

Of course, if your file is small and you don't care about performance then you solve your problem easily enough. This recipe shows how to insert a record into position i in the file. For your stated goal of inserting at the start then i would be zero.

  • Read then entire file into an array of N records.
  • Write the first i records back to the file.
  • Write the inserted record back to the file.
  • Write the remaining N-i original records back to the file.
  • What do you mean by the "First i" record and the "inserted record"? – Jackets Apr 20 '14 at 19:42
  • This is a recipe for inserting a record at position i. If you want to insert before any others, then i has value 0. I very much doubt that you really want to do this mind you. I strongly suspect that you have the wrong solution to your problem. – David Heffernan Apr 20 '14 at 19:44
  • I would like to do what Boris suggested basically but I'm having trouble reading ALL of the records. It currently only reads one record for some reason. – Jackets Apr 20 '14 at 19:47
  • Well, all three answers say the same thing. Boris is suggesting exactly the same as the other answers. If you don't know how to read and write files then that's where to start. When you can do that move on to insertion. Do you care about performance or does it not matter that what you are attempting will perform appallingly. – David Heffernan Apr 20 '14 at 19:49
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    First of all you should read from a text book or some docs or a tutorial how to do pascal io. Then when you get stuck ask question with simple code. You should also accept an answer here in due course. Pick the best one as you judge it. – David Heffernan Apr 20 '14 at 20:06
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A variant of this.

procedure InsertFile(const aFile, aLine: String);
var
  vList: TStringList;
begin
  vList:= TStringList.Create;
  try
    vList.LoadFromFile(aFile);
    vList.Insert(0, aLine);
    vList.SaveToFile(aFile);
  finally
    vList.Free;
  end;
end;

But with same limitations. For large files it will be slow as whole file is loaded in memory.

  • Insert(1, aLine) ? It should be Insert(0, aLine): You want aLine to be the first line (index 0), and the index of the Insert method always refers to the index before which the line is inserted. – wp_1233996 Oct 19 '17 at 16:52
  • Ok you are correct. I copied that from production code and in that case I want to preserve the first line. – Roland Bengtsson Oct 19 '17 at 18:08

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