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Both server and client software are compiled with GCC, and running on Linux. However, they are running on different platforms.

Provided that endianess is already handled, is it safe to pass the structure raw if we are using fixed-size stdint types for each member? meaning without taking special care of alignment/padding.

Edit: We control both server and client software. They are compiled using the same gcc version by us, i.e. no different pack attribute between server and client.

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    It is (almost?) never a good idea. – Lee Duhem Apr 21 '14 at 5:49
  • "Different platforms" means different architectures? Such as x86 and ARM or SPARC or something? – Thomas Padron-McCarthy Apr 21 '14 at 6:09
  • @Thomas yeah, different architecture, one end could be x86-64, the other end could be a PPC 32bit. – wei Apr 22 '14 at 19:41
  • @LeeDuhem yeah, I agree that it is not a good idea in general (a platform independent serialization protocol should be used if possible), but we kinda have a special case here. – wei Apr 22 '14 at 19:44
  • @wei No, your case is not special. – Lee Duhem Apr 22 '14 at 22:40
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No. Even if you're using fixed-size integer types, different versions of GCC on your server and client may still disagree with the padding between adjacent struct members, and possibly the alignment of the whole struct. E.g. GCC on your server uses one-byte padding while the one on your client doesn't.

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As @EricZ suggested there're a lot of corner cases where your data simply corrupted. I would suggest to use a library to pack/unpack data, e.g. Protobuf

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This is what XDR was invented for. Or, if the amount of data is small, use XML or JSON.

In a production system, even if a machine-/OS-/language-/patch-level-specific byte-stream for network transfer is the only possible way to achieve your goals with today's technology, you must have a formal definition of your data stream encoding. And you will have to live with it for the lifetime of the system. Especially if a machine-/OS-/language-/patch-level-specific byte-stream for network transfer is the only possible way to achieve your goals with today's technology, you must have a formal definition of your data stream encoding.

And remember, "Premature optimization is the root of all evil."

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