0

I have a class named Class1 and In this class I have a property named MyProperty. In another class I declare Class1 property but I want in this situation MyProperty be readonly. How can I do this?

public class Class1
{
     public int MyProperty { get; set; }
}

public class Class2
{
     public Class1 Class1Property { get; }
}

public class Class3
{
    void Method()
    {
        Class2 obj = new Class2();
        obj.Class1Property.MyProperty = 2;//I want this be illegal (In this place only)
    }
}
  • try public int MyProperty { get; private set; } – Sudhakar Tillapudi Apr 21 '14 at 8:18
  • I want just in this place MyProperty be readonly. – mohammad Apr 21 '14 at 8:19
5

Do some further abstraction and create an interface for Class1:

public interface IClass1
{
    int MyProperty { get; }
}

Then make Class1 implement this interface:

public class Class1 : IClass1
{
    public int MyProperty { get; set; }
}

Class2 should not expose a Class1 instance, but an instance of IClass1:

public class Class2
{
    public IClass1 Class1Property { get; }
}

Now you got the behaviour you want:

public class Class3
{
    void Method()
    {
        Class2 obj = new Class2();
        obj.Class1Property.MyProperty = 2; // Doesn't work.
    }
}
  • (Remark) Class2 will require a backing field for Class1Property, which will need to be of type Class1. Class2 has full access to the backing field, but the Class1Property.get will return the read-only interface. – rwong Apr 21 '14 at 8:27
  • 1
    Also, the interface approach could be circumvented with a type cast. (obj.Class1Property as Class1).MyProperty = 2; – rwong Apr 21 '14 at 8:27
  • That's allways the deal. However that's not the a good way to code. You should allways write code against interfaces. – Carsten Apr 21 '14 at 8:33
  • Perhaps it's better to ask OP to clarify the purpose. That aside, I'm pointing out that there are three approaches to ReadOnly - (1) For initialize-once values, use readonly keyword. (2) For guarding against casual modifications, use a read-only interface as you demonstrated. (3) For situations where modification must be guarded against a malevolent user, use a read-only proxy object (a full class that wraps the original class.) – rwong Apr 21 '14 at 8:39
3

Class1 has decided that MyProperty is modifiable, no matter how you obtain a Class1, so what you want simply is not possible.

There are some ways that you can re-work your design, though. This is the approach I would take:

public class ReadOnlyClass1
{
    public int MyProperty { get; protected set; }
}

public class Class1 : ReadOnlyClass1
{
    public new int MyProperty {
        get { return base.MyProperty; }
        set { base.MyProperty = value; }
    }
}

Now, you can give Class3 a property of type ReadOnlyClass1.

0

There are a couple ways to do this, the easiest as mentioned in the comments is by making the setter of "MyProperty" private:

public int MyProperty { get; private set; }

You can also try another access modifier that better suits your need.

Just think what the get and set mean: When being compiled, a Getter and Setter method gets created much like it was implemented in java.

You can also create the property with just a "get" and implement the "set" functionality outside of the property itself (like in the class constructor, in an internal method or something like that).

0
public int myProperty{get;private set;}//this is read only property

obj.Class1Property.MyProperty = 2;//this is illegal

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.