6

I'm sure we're all familiar and probably use the plethora of code provided in books, online, etc. in reading a file using C#. Something as simple as...

StringBuilder fiContents = new StringBuilder();
using (StreamReader fi = new StreamReader(@"C:\a_file.txt"))
{
    while (!fi.EndOfStream)
    {
        fiContents.Append(fi.ReadLine); 
    }
}

Or maybe something as short as...

using (StreamReader fi = new StreamReader(@"C:\a_file.txt"))
    fiContents.Append(fi.ReadToEnd());

Now let's go Super Saiyan for a moment and do really fancy stuff like have a BackgroundWorker which will allow us show a loading image (this what I'll use), provide a process countdown timer or ProgressBar.

public void ReadFile(string filename)
{
    BackgroundWorker procFile = new BackgroundWorker();
    // Progress 1: If we want to show the progress we need to enable the following property
    // procFile.WorkerReportsProgress = true;

    profile.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler((object obj, DoWorkEventArgs ev) =>
    {
        StringBuilder fiContents = new StringBuilder();

        using (StreamReader fi = new StreamReader(filename))
        {
            while (!fi.EndOfStream)
            {
                // Progress 2: Report the progress, this will be dealt with by the respective handler (below).
                // procFile.ReportProgress((int)(fi.BaseStream.Length / fi.BaseStream.Position) / 100);

                fiContents.Append(fi.ReadLine);
            }
        }

        ev.Result = fiContents;
    }

    /* Progress 3: The handler below will take care of updating the progress of the file as it's processed. 
    procFile.ProgressChanged += new ProgressChangedEventHandler((object obj, ProgressChangedEventArgs ev) =>
    {
        // Progress 4: Do something with the value, such as update a ProgressBar. 
        // ....
    }
    */

    procFile.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler((object obj, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs ev) =>
    {
         // Do something with the result (ev.Result), bearing in mind, it is a StringBuilder and the ev.Result is an object. 
         StringBuilder result = ev.Result as StringBuilder; 

         // ....
    }
}

+++++ +++++ +++++ +++++

Time for the actual question... The above was a warm-up and to show a current level of understanding so I don't face these as prospective answers.

I'm pretty much doing the last code example given above (i.e. using a BackgroundWorker) and dumping the contents of what is read to a RichTextBox. Simple stuff really.

The problem I'm facing however is processing large files (e.g. ~222MB). The case being just taking a .txt, reading it, pushing the result of it built through a StringBuilder into the RichTextBox. It cannot load the file, I get an OutOfMemoryException. One way around this, which takes a considerable amount (and still doesn't load the file) is iterating through the string and adding each character (as a char) from the file StringBuilder.

I've always used the most basic and straightforward means of reading files (such as the examples given above), but does anyone have any guidance on how to improve on this? Ways of processing extremely large files? etc.

Even as a discussion piece, I'd welcome your ideas.

+++++ +++++ +++++ +++++

Edit 1 (@TaW): the exception was thrown when trying to put the string into the RichTextBox...

FileProcessing.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs((object obj, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e) =>
{
    // 'Code' is the RichTextBox in question...

    Code.Text = "";

    if (e.Result is StringBuilder)
    {
        Code.Text = (e.Result as StringBuilder).ToString();
    }
}
14
  • Personally, I just use File.ReadAllText(filename) but then I'm lazy.
    – user1228
    Apr 21, 2014 at 13:38
  • The short answer is that to load a file that's too big for memory, you simply can't load it all at once. Loading only the part of the file that currently in view in the scrolling control is a common solution. Apr 21, 2014 at 13:41
  • 1
    Reading a 200MB file should take so little time that a progress bar and a background worker is overkill. Apr 21, 2014 at 13:43
  • @Will: nothing wrong with that! ;) Apr 21, 2014 at 13:45
  • 1
    I believe there is no virtualization for a rich textbox because virtualization works best with IList, not IEnumerable (and strings could be thought of as IEnumerable<char>). Behind the scenes the virtualization makes use of indexers so the entire collection doesn't need to be iterated to get to a given position (the section we want to display). Imagine trying to scroll backwards through an IEnumerable...not possible without starting over at the beginning.
    – Jason Down
    Apr 21, 2014 at 14:51

3 Answers 3

2

Is there a restriction you have that requires you to use a RichTextBox as the control to display your content? This control is not virtualized and will cause you performance (and by the looks of it memory error) issues.

There are a family of document viewing controls that are better designed for displaying large documents. Various controls exists depending on your needs (fixed, flowing via page or scrolling). In addition, you get searching, printing, zooming and a few other features that are often useful for viewing large documents.

1
  • I'm actually developing a script editor (with highlighting and intelli-sense), which is now complete and required a RichTextBox so I could achieve the highlighting and other features. So they will be plain-text files. Apr 21, 2014 at 16:00
0

Have you tried the MemoryMapped ,
Its pretty useful lib for handling large files

0

this is not about advanced reading but about hitting the capacity limits of (Winforms) controls. Maybe you can get it to work in WPF, but in Winforms neither a RichTextBox nor a TextBox can hold such a large amount of lines/text.

I advise you to redesign this to present the data to the users in smaller chunks. It is not that they would want to scroll through 100.000+ lines. Processing them in memory is not an issue; here 200MB is not large at all; you can for example easily search in it in memory etc..

1
  • The question I posed, whilst being asked through a problem (which indeed were the limitations of WinForm controls), was further techniques in file I/O with C# and a discussion. Hence why I provided many code examples, to demonstrate some of the techniques I'm familiar with and probably what the majority of others use. I completely agree with your second point. Apr 22, 2014 at 13:11

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