82

I want to set up my site so that if a user hits the /login page and they are already logged in, it will redirect them to the homepage. If they are not logged in then it will display normally. How can I do this since the login code is built into Django?

0

10 Answers 10

84

I'm assuming you're currently using the built-in login view, with

(r'^accounts/login/$', 'django.contrib.auth.views.login'),

or something similar in your urls.

You can write your own login view that wraps the default one. It will check if the user is already logged in (through is_authenticated attribute official documentation) and redirect if he is, and use the default view otherwise.

something like:

from django.contrib.auth.views import login

def custom_login(request):
    if request.user.is_authenticated:
        return HttpResponseRedirect(...)
    else:
        return login(request)

and of course change your urls accordingly:

(r'^accounts/login/$', custom_login),
8
  • 21
    You should declare custom_login with a second argument **kwargs so that it passes all arguments you don't care to the built-in login view.
    – viam0Zah
    Jun 18, 2010 at 7:41
  • 16
    Why isn't this default behaviour? I can't imagine a situation where an already logged in user should see the login page? Oct 22, 2011 at 16:10
  • 2
    An already logged in user may be redirected to LOGIN_URL by user_passes_test (and thus permission_required) decorators, if he doesn't have enough permissions to access a certain view.
    – Anatoly Rr
    Jun 13, 2012 at 6:56
  • 2
    @TimmyO'Mahony seems like LinkedIn doesn't like your logic 😂
    – katsos
    Dec 26, 2017 at 12:24
  • 2
    This doesn't work anymore because login has been removed. @rodolfojcj answer below works.
    – olfek
    Feb 8, 2020 at 20:30
68

The Django 1.10 way

For Django 1.10, released in August 2016, a new parameter named redirect_authenticated_user was added to the login() function based view present in django.contrib.auth [1].

Example

Suppose we have a Django application with a file named views.py and another file named urls.py. The urls.py file will contain some Python code like this:

#
# Django 1.10 way
#
from django.contrib.auth import views as auth_views
from . import views as app_views


urlpatterns = [
    url(r'^admin/', admin.site.urls),
    url(r'^login/', auth_views.login, name='login',
        kwargs={'redirect_authenticated_user': True}),
    url(r'^dashboard/', app_views.Dashboard.as_view(), name='dashboard'),
    url(r'^$', TemplateView.as_view(template_name='index.html'), name='index'),
]

From that file, the relevant part within the urlpatterns variable definition is the following, which uses the already mentioned redirect_authenticated_user parameter with a True value:

    url(r'^login/', auth_views.login, name='login',
        kwargs={'redirect_authenticated_user': True}),

Take note that the default value of the redirect_authenticated_user parameter is False.

The Django 1.11 way

For Django 1.11, released in April 2017, the LoginView class based view superseded the login() function based view [2], which gives you two options to choose from:

  • Use the same Django 1.10 way just described before, which is a positive thing because your current code will continue working fine. If you tell Python interpreter to display warnings, by for example running in a console terminal the command python -Wd manage.py runserver in your Django project directory and then going with a web browser to your login page, you would see in that same console terminal a warning message like this:

/usr/local/lib/python3.6/site-packages/django/contrib/auth/views.py:54: RemovedInDjango21Warning: The login() view is superseded by the class-based LoginView().

  • Use the new Django 1.11 way, which will make your code more modern and compatible with future Django releases. With this option, the example given before will now look like the following one:

Example

We again suppose that we have a Django application with a file named views.py and another file named urls.py. The urls.py file will contain some Python code like this:

#
# Django 1.11 way
#
from django.contrib.auth import views as auth_views
from . import views as app_views


urlpatterns = [
    url(r'^admin/', admin.site.urls),
    url(r'^login/',
        auth_views.LoginView.as_view(redirect_authenticated_user=True),
        name='login'),
    url(r'^dashboard/', app_views.Dashboard.as_view(), name='dashboard'),
    url(r'^$', TemplateView.as_view(template_name='index.html'), name='index'),
]

From that file, the relevant part within the urlpatterns variable definition is the following, which again uses the already mentioned redirect_authenticated_user parameter with a True value, but passing it as an argument to the as_view method of the LoginView class:

    url(r'^login/',
        auth_views.LoginView.as_view(redirect_authenticated_user=False),
        name='login'),

Take note that here the default value of the redirect_authenticated_user parameter is also False.

References

2
  • 1
    @Quique gave a neat solution that works with Django 2.x stackoverflow.com/a/53764272/9177173
    – ohlr
    Feb 3, 2019 at 13:14
  • I am getting this error when i followed this method. login() missing 1 required positional argument: 'user'. I got this error when upgraded to Django 2.2. Any reason how to clear it? Apr 24, 2019 at 17:26
27

For Django 2.x, in your urls.py:

from django.contrib.auth import views as auth_views
from django.urls import path

urlpatterns = [
    path('login/', auth_views.LoginView.as_view(redirect_authenticated_user=True), name='login'),
]
3
  • This works perfect with Django 2.x. The entire list of auth_urls can be found on github: github.com/django/django/blob/master/django/contrib/auth/…
    – ohlr
    Feb 3, 2019 at 13:10
  • How do i do a redirect if i have my url and using django loginview as below. urlpatterns = [ url(r'^$', LoginView.as_view(template_name='landing.html'), name='landing') ] Apr 24, 2019 at 18:02
  • This can also be used for overriding the login view, just above path("", include("django.contrib.auth.urls")),
    – Udi
    Jan 18, 2021 at 6:18
26

anonymous_required decorator

For class based views

Code:

from django.shortcuts import redirect

def anonymous_required(func):
    def as_view(request, *args, **kwargs):
        redirect_to = kwargs.get('next', settings.LOGIN_REDIRECT_URL )
        if request.user.is_authenticated():
            return redirect(redirect_to)
        response = func(request, *args, **kwargs)
        return response
    return as_view

Usage:

url(r'^/?$',
   anonymous_required(auth_views.login),
),
url(r'^register/?$',
    anonymous_required(RegistrationView.as_view()),
    name='auth.views.register'
),
# Could be used to decorate the dispatch function of the view instead of the url

For view functions

From http://blog.motane.lu/2010/01/06/django-anonymous_required-decorator/

Code:

from django.http import HttpResponseRedirect

def anonymous_required( view_function, redirect_to = None ):
    return AnonymousRequired( view_function, redirect_to )

class AnonymousRequired( object ):
    def __init__( self, view_function, redirect_to ):
        if redirect_to is None:
            from django.conf import settings
            redirect_to = settings.LOGIN_REDIRECT_URL
        self.view_function = view_function
        self.redirect_to = redirect_to

    def __call__( self, request, *args, **kwargs ):
        if request.user is not None and request.user.is_authenticated():
            return HttpResponseRedirect( self.redirect_to )
        return self.view_function( request, *args, **kwargs )

Usage:

@anonymous_required
def my_view( request ):
    return render_to_response( 'my-view.html' )
4
  • 1
    Using a decorator is the best answer. This type of logic only clutters up the actual views. Oct 17, 2013 at 8:36
  • And to add, for CBVs, you're really better off writing it as a mixin and overloading dispatch(). See django-braces for many examples. Oct 17, 2013 at 8:39
  • hey, you should be getting more up votes for your answer. by far the better answer and way more versatile of an approach. Apr 29, 2014 at 3:27
  • I am getting this error when i followed this method. login() missing 1 required positional argument: 'user'. Any reason how to clear it? Apr 24, 2019 at 17:24
12

Add this decorator above your login view to redirect to /home if a user is already logged in

@user_passes_test(lambda user: not user.username, login_url='/home', redirect_field_name=None)

and don't forget to import the decorator

from django.contrib.auth.decorators import user_passes_test

6
  • I love how my suggestion was down-voted w/o an explanation. I'm particularly proud of this discovery because it's elegant, pragmatic, and it's a one liner!
    – Stephen
    Apr 15, 2014 at 22:40
  • this is the most elegant solution imo. Jun 12, 2015 at 7:31
  • This is great if you are not using the generic views provided by django.contrib.auth
    – cardonator
    Jun 12, 2015 at 17:27
  • 1
    user.is_anonymous() may be better than testing the username. Jan 26, 2016 at 20:10
  • 1
    I think the downvote may be related to the fact that this function is specifically for redirecting people to the login page. For example, it encodes the current URL into a next GET variable. Jan 26, 2016 at 20:30
10

Since class based views (CBVs) is on the rise. This approach will help you redirect to another url when accessing view for non authenticated users only.

In my example the sign-up page overriding the dispatch() method.

class Signup(CreateView):
    template_name = 'sign-up.html'

    def dispatch(self, *args, **kwargs):
        if self.request.user.is_authenticated:
            return redirect('path/to/desired/url')
        return super().dispatch(*args, **kwargs)

Cheers!

10

https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/3.1/topics/auth/default/#all-authentication-views

Add the redirect route in settings

LOGIN_URL = 'login'

And in the URLs add redirect_authenticated_user=True to LoginView

path('login/', auth_views.LoginView.as_view(template_name='users/login.html',redirect_authenticated_user=True), name='login')
1
  • This should be the accepted answer now on. perfect +1
    – trex
    Apr 5, 2021 at 6:00
3

I know this is a pretty old question, but I'll add my technique in case anyone else needs it:


myproject/myapp/views/misc.py

from django.contrib.auth.views import login as contrib_login, logout as contrib_logout
from django.shortcuts import redirect
from django.conf import settings


def login(request, **kwargs):
    if request.user.is_authenticated():
        return redirect(settings.LOGIN_REDIRECT_URL)
    else:
        return contrib_login(request, **kwargs)

logout = contrib_logout

myproject/myapp/urls.py

from django.conf.urls import patterns, url

urlpatterns = patterns('myapp.views.misc',
    url(r'^login/$', 'login', {'template_name': 'myapp/login.html'}, name='login'),
    url(r'^logout/$', 'logout', {'template_name': 'myapp/logout.html'}, name='logout'),
)
...
0

Assuming that you are done setting up built-in Django user authentication (and using decorators), add this in your settings.py:

LOGIN_REDIRECT_URL = '/welcome/'

NOTE: '/welcome/' here is the URL of the homepage. It is up to you what to replace it with.

1
  • 2
    -1, LOGIN_REDIRECT_URL is used only when an user successfully logs in Jul 31, 2012 at 23:41
-7

All you have to do is set the "root" url to the homepage view. Since the homepage view is already restricted for logged on users, it'll automatically redirect anonymous users to the login page.

Kepp the url as it is. And add something like:

(r'^$', 'my_project.my_app.views.homepage'),
4
  • 1
    Please read the OP carefully. The question is about how to redirect logged in users from the login page if they were already authenticated. The built-in login view does not cover this case.
    – viam0Zah
    Jun 18, 2010 at 7:43
  • The approach I suggest works just as well. All he wants is for logged in users to skip the login page. My approach suggests that the main (root) page is the home page. Since the home page is login restricted, anonymous users will be redirected to the login page. I've use this approach before. Don't mark my solution down because you don't understand it.
    – Luiz C.
    Jun 22, 2010 at 16:47
  • 2
    It still doesn't fix the problem. A logged in user would still be able to reach the the login page (by typing the url or whatever). Apr 26, 2013 at 23:56
  • "You don't understand it" LoL – you did not understand the question
    – user4396006
    Dec 16, 2017 at 19:29

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