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I have no idea why my code is giving me a null for java.util.date.

Question: Write a test program that creates an Account object with an account ID of 1122, a balance of 20000, and an annual interest rate of 4.5%. Use the withdraw method to withdraw $2500, use the deposit method to deposit $3000, and print the balance, the monthly interest, and the date when this account was created
Here is my code:

import java.util.*;  
public class Account {  
private int ID;  
private double Balance;  
private double annualInterestRate;  
private java.util.Date dateCreated;  
public Account(){}  
public Account(int ID, double Balance, double annualInterestRate){  
    this.ID=ID;  
    this.Balance=Balance;  
    this.annualInterestRate= annualInterestRate;  
}  
public void setID(int ID){  
    this.ID=ID;  
}
public void setBalance(double Balance){  
    this.Balance=Balance;  
}  
public void setAnnualInterestRate(double annualInterestRate){  
    this.annualInterestRate= annualInterestRate;  
}  
public int getID(){  
    return ID;  
}  
public double getBalance(){  
    return Balance;  
}  
public double getInterestRate(){  
    return annualInterestRate;  
}  
public java.util.Date getDateCreated(){  
    return dateCreated;  
}  
public double getMonthlyInterestRate(){  
    return annualInterestRate/12;  
}  
public void withDraw(double val){  
    if ((Balance - val) <0)  
    {  
        System.out.println("Offensive content removed from this line");  
    }  
    else  
    {  
        Balance -= val;  
    }  
}  
public void dePosits(double value){  
    Balance += value;  
}  

public static void main(String [] arges){  
Account account = new Account(1122, 20000,.045);  
account.withDraw(2500);  
account.dePosits(3000);  
System.out.println(account.getBalance());  
System.out.println(account.getDateCreated());  
}   

}

  • 1
    In the future please consider posting more minimal examples. For example, the actual assignment requirements are irrelevant. So are methods like getInterestRate(). Narrowing down the problem when posting a question may help you find the problem as you do it. – Jason C Apr 21 '14 at 21:22
  • As this is obviously a homework question, here is also some advice as this a fairly trivial problem: You might want to get familiar with a debugger (I guess you use Eclipse or some other IDE), they can show you easily such errors by stepping through the program. Also, you might want to read up about basic Java programming. – dirkk Apr 21 '14 at 21:25
  • @dirkk thats a rather harsh comment. "you might want to read up about basic java programming" I think its obvious im a beginner no need to say something that distasteful. – user3083893 Apr 21 '14 at 21:33
  • 2
    If everyone learnt to use a debugger, the volume of questions on Stack Overflow would take a serious hit. – Dawood says reinstate Monica Apr 21 '14 at 21:33
  • 1
    @user3558063 It was not meant to be harsh, it was meant to be a helpful advice. As you made a very basic mistake I thought it would be a good idea if you read some basic tutorials. This is nothing to be ashamed about, we all know nothing in the beginning, so we all started sometime with reading basic stuff. Also, please mind that SO is international and we might have a cultural gap about what is harsh (I am German, so as a stereotype I am super direct in communicating), but my comment was certainly not distasteful. – dirkk Apr 21 '14 at 21:39
3

You haven't initialized dateCreated. For example, in the constructor (or somewhere else depending on your use case)

dateCreated = new java.util.Date();  

or any other way to initialize with the date it needs.

  • Thank you i appreciate the help. – user3083893 Apr 21 '14 at 21:35

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