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When implementing some interface, as given in a header file, how best to prevent dangerous mismatches between the compilations of the library implementation and the header file?

Details: a library interface is provided by a header file, say, foo.h, and its implementation by some source file, say, foo.cc. The latter is compiled to create the library, say, libfoo.so, while the former #include<>ed by an application, which is linked against libfoo.so.

Now, suppose in foo.h

// foo.h
namespace foo {
  class bar
  {
#ifdef SomeOption
    std::int32_t x[2];
#else
    std::int64_t x[2];
#endif
    bar const*ptr;
    /* ... */
  };
}

Then the offset of ptr is either 8 or 16 bytes, depending on SomeOption (and the sizeof(bar) also differs). Now, if the library was compiled with a different value for SomeOption than the application, then obviously serious trouble will ensue (which is hard to debug for the unaware).

A solution? So, I came up with the following idea

// foo.h
namespace foo {
  enum { hasSomeOption = 1 };
  int options_flags()
  {
    return 0
#ifdef SomeOption
    | hasSomeOption
#endif
    ;
  }
  class bar
  {
    /* ... as before */ 
    bar(some_args, int);
  public:
    bar(some_args) : bar(some_args, options_flags()) {} // what's option_flags()?
    /* ... */
  };
}

and

// foo.cc
namespace {
  const int src_flags = options_flags(); // flags used for compiling library source
}
namespace foo {
  bar::bar(some_args, int app_flags)
  {        
    assert(app_flags == src_flags);
    /* ... */
  }
}

with the idea that the assert will catch any inconsistencies. However, this doesn't work: the compiler seems to optimize my idea away and the assert never triggers, even if SomeOption was different for library and application compilation.

Questions Is there a recommended best method for this type of problem?

1

I hope there's a better way, but you can always change the class or namespace name based on the option, so that if someone uses the wrong compiler option - the class will not be found.

Changing the namespace's name seems better - it won't cause a lot of confusion when using a debugger. Something like this:

#ifdef SomeOption
    #define foo foo_32bit
#else
    #define foo foo_64bit
#endif

namespace foo
{
 ....
}

I guess it'll work, but it sure is ugly.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Interesting idea. Using the class name allows more finer distinctions (some classes in foo.h may be differently/less affected) and one can always provide an alias. Is this a common approach? – Walter Apr 22 '14 at 9:25
  • Using the class name might confuse people when they debug the code, and the debugger shows the actual class name. Note that you just want your users to be aware of the mismatch and fix it. I have no idea if it's a common approach, it came up to me as I was reading your question. – zmbq Apr 22 '14 at 9:34
  • I eventually implemented this idea using scrambling on the class names and aliases for the unscrambled names. Attempt to link to the library fails when using inconsistent flags. IMHO better than a run-time error, since earlier, though cannot have a nice error message explaining the real cause of the issue. Btw, the issue that a debugger reports the scrambled names does also hold for namespaces and is a typical issue with std classes, which are usually implemented using some obscure sub-namespaces. – Walter Apr 22 '14 at 15:08

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