8

I have a tab delimited file with some columns and rows for example: some rows might not have value for some columns. What we know is that the "order" doesn't change so always third tab delimited thing is for Column3 and so on.

Column1  Column2  Column3 .... Column12 .... Column34 ... Column50
123  34 ABC
234     DEF                                   [email protected]    True
     45           NYC                         [email protected]  False      

Now I need to read this file but not all of the columns are important for my program. For example I only need to do some stuff with values in Column2, Column12,Column45

What approach do you suggest?

3
  • 4
    read line by line, split on tabs, grab the columns that you need. What else are you looking for exactly? Apr 22, 2014 at 17:09
  • 2
    Are you looking for opinions or are you having trouble with a particular part of the problem?
    – D Stanley
    Apr 22, 2014 at 17:09
  • @Jonesy I don't know this part: " grab the columns that you need" Also what's an efficient way of reading the file that doesn't crash or go out of memory if file is big?
    – user2740190
    Apr 22, 2014 at 17:15

6 Answers 6

12

Try following approach

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    DataTable datatable = new DataTable();
    StreamReader streamreader = new StreamReader(@"C:\Temp\txt.txt");
    char[] delimiter = new char[] { '\t' };
    string[] columnheaders = streamreader.ReadLine().Split(delimiter);
    foreach (string columnheader in columnheaders)
    {
        datatable.Columns.Add(columnheader); // I've added the column headers here.
    }

    while (streamreader.Peek() > 0)
    {
        DataRow datarow = datatable.NewRow();
        datarow.ItemArray = streamreader.ReadLine().Split(delimiter);
        datatable.Rows.Add(datarow);
    }

    foreach (DataRow row in datatable.Rows)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(""----Row No: " + datatable.Rows.IndexOf(row) + "----"");

        foreach (DataColumn column in datatable.Columns)
        {
            //check what columns you need
            if (column.ColumnName == "Column2" || 
                column.ColumnName == "Column12" ||
                column.ColumnName == "Column45") 
            {
                Console.Write(column.ColumnName);
                Console.Write(" ");
                Console.WriteLine(row[column]);
            }
        }
    }
    Console.ReadLine();
}
6
  • wow..beautiful :) Is there any final thoughts, considerations you might have? Or looks good to you and I go and use it?
    – user2740190
    Apr 22, 2014 at 17:46
  • I'm curious why you went with this answer over @Sudhakar's? In my opinion it's much more simple Apr 22, 2014 at 17:58
  • @Jonesy correct, I am still evaluating them all. Right now not sure why this answer didn't keep the order of the records it prints the same as what was in the input file....
    – user2740190
    Apr 22, 2014 at 18:01
  • @Jonesy Tried that too, it crashes.
    – user2740190
    Apr 22, 2014 at 18:08
  • 1
    @DevWannaBe - I don't know what you meant by order of records not maintained. I updated the code to display the row index from the input file. I hope this helps you see what the order of each row is in the input file. Apr 22, 2014 at 18:17
8

Don't roll your own. There are...subtleties that aren't immediately apparent. Among others:

  • quoted fields?
  • data containing embedded field and/or record separators
  • wrong length recordes
  • etc.

Instead, use something like Sebastien Lorion's most excellent Fast CSV Reader from CodeProject.

Edited to note: Despite the name, this is a general-purpose reader for delimited text files. Configurable items include

  • field separator character
  • record separator character
  • quote character (for quoted text)
  • escape character (for embedded quotes)
  • where or not commenting is allowed. If enabled, the comment character (see below) starts a comment, ended by the next record separator.
  • comment character (by default, '#')
  • whether or not the first line is a header, containing field names.
2
  • 1
    thanks but mine is tab delimited text file. The one you suggested is for CSVs?
    – user2740190
    Apr 22, 2014 at 17:19
  • 2
    The only difference is your choice of field and record separators. Just configure it to use HT ('\t') instead of comma (',') as the field separator. Apr 22, 2014 at 17:21
6
var list = from row in System.IO.File.ReadLines("file.txt")
           let arr = row.Split('\t')
           select new Tuple<string, string, string>(arr[2], arr[12], arr[45]);
1
  • 1
    This should be the accepted answer. Incredibly simple, and easy to manipulate after getting the data. I like @Sudhakar Tillapudi answer as well if you wish to have a proper data model. Reading line by line seems so daunting, just give me all the data. The issue here would be if you wanted to read out every single column of a file that has many columns
    – stepheaw
    Jan 22, 2020 at 3:50
5

You can use File.ReadLines() method (if you are using .NET Framework Version 4.0 or above) without any performance penalty as it would not load whole file content into Memory.

Try This:

using System.IO;

class FileData
{
public string Column2{ get; set; }
public string Column12{ get; set; }
public string Column45{ get; set; }
}


List<FileData> filedata =  new List<FileData>();

 FileData temp = new FileData();
 foreach(var line in File.ReadLines("filepath.txt").Skip(1))
 {     
   var tempLine = line.Split('\t');
   temp.Column2 = tempLine[1];
   temp.Column12 = tempLine[11];
   temp.Column45 = tempLine[44]; 
   filedata.Add(temp);
 }
10
  • A list of a defined object structure would likely be better than three independent lists of values :)
    – David
    Apr 22, 2014 at 17:19
  • How can I ignore the first line of the file? which is for column names..the next rows are data but first row is column names Column1 Column2 Column3 .... Column12 .... Column34 ... Column50
    – user2740190
    Apr 22, 2014 at 17:21
  • 1
    @DevWannaBe: Either convert the foreach to a for and skip the first line, or introduce a counter or flag variable. Something like var skip = true and then in the loop if (skip) { skip = false; continue; }. Either way would work, it's just a matter of what you consider more readable/supportable.
    – David
    Apr 22, 2014 at 17:22
  • 3
    why not just File.ReadLines("filepath.txt").Skip(1))? Apr 22, 2014 at 17:24
  • @Jonesy: Good Point, Edited my post Apr 22, 2014 at 17:48
2

Just read all lines of your file, then split on tab delimiter, to gain access to each column.

   var fileArray = File.ReadAllLines(myLocation);
    
        for(int i=0;i<fileArray.Length;i++)
        {
           var line=fileArray[i];

           if (i == 0)
           {  
              //handle column names
           }
           else
           {
             var columns = line.Split('\t');
             string value = columns[3];
           }
        }
6
  • The file might be big, Is there a more efficient way so we can read one line at a time?
    – user2740190
    Apr 22, 2014 at 17:15
  • 1
    Modified answer to handle column names too
    – Cam Bruce
    Apr 22, 2014 at 17:24
  • 1
    in for(int i=0;i< line<fileArray.Length;i++) what is "line" it doesn't even compile :(
    – user2740190
    Apr 22, 2014 at 18:12
  • 1
    sorry, was a typo from my earlier answer
    – Cam Bruce
    Apr 22, 2014 at 18:19
  • 2
    Incomplete example - You need to define what line is.
    – PhillyNJ
    Jun 7, 2019 at 13:43
2

As Nicholas said, don't roll your own as there are subtleties and special cases.

An option is TextFieldParser.

using (var parser = new TextFieldParser(filePath))
{
    parser.TextFieldType = FieldType.Delimited;
    parser.SetDelimiters("\t");

    while (!parser.EndOfData)
    {
        var cols = parser.ReadFields();
        // Can now access columns, eg cols[0]
    }
}
1
  • This required .net5.0.
    – ErocM
    Aug 1, 2021 at 18:39

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