1

More specifically, when I hover my cursor over a picture it would transform into a different picture. Or what I'm actually looking for: When I hover over text it would change into different text.

Thanks.

  • Yes, you can do this with JavaScript. Can you be more specific as to what you want to do? First you need to catch the mouseover event. Next you need to manipulate the DOM. I suggest looking into jQuery to make this easy, but it isn't 100% necessary. – Brad Apr 22 '14 at 22:08
  • 1
    Please go to “help”, “Tour”. – PointedEars Apr 22 '14 at 22:16
7

Yes, you would use the DOM events mouseenter and mouseleave. to change the image source.

Or you could use CSS :hover psuedo-class like this:

<div class="derp"></div>

.derp {
    background-image:url(someURL);
}
.derp:hover {
    background-image:url(someOtherURL);
}
  • 2
    −1. Events are not language-specific (the entire DOM API is not), and they are mouseover and mouseout; anything else is proprietary at this time. And an element with no content has no intrinsic width or height, therefore no visible background-image. – PointedEars Apr 22 '14 at 22:22
  • 3
    mouseout is different than mouseleave. mouseout also fires if you mouse off a child of the listener. There is nothing wrong with calling those events @PointedEars. – rlemon Apr 22 '14 at 22:26
  • That an this isn't a copy-paste-problem-solved-answer. It's a guide to right right way of learning. – Sterling Archer Apr 22 '14 at 22:27
  • 2
    @rlemon First of all, events are not called; at most they are fired at elements and handled by listeners. Second, there is no child element, so bubbling is not an issue (or maybe there is a child and bubbling is wanted – who knows?). Third, you should not rely on events that are only in a Working Draft when there are sufficiently equivalent events in a Recommendation. – PointedEars Apr 22 '14 at 22:29
1

Yes, it's easiest with the CSS :hover pseudo-elector.

#theimage {
  display: block;
  width: 400px;
  height: 400px;
  background: url('image1.png') 0 0 no-repeat;
}

#theimage:hover {
  background: url('image2.png') 0 0 no-repeat
}

If you want to do things that are more complicated then you can use Javascript, which can use more complicated logic and access properties and attributes like the src of an image tag.

JSFiddle

You would also probably want to preload the image so that there is no delay the first time you hover (after clearing your cache). That's done best with Javascript:

<script>
  (new Image).src = 'image2.png';
</script>
-1

For changing text, you'll probably want to use JS. You could do something like this:

<script type=text/javascript>
    function changetext()
    {
        var textchange2 = "new text" ;
        var id = document.getElementById("ElementToChange");
        id.innerHTML=textchange2;
    }

    function changetextback()
    {
        var textchange2 = "original text" ;
        var id = document.getElementById("ElementToChange");
        id.innerHTML=textchange2;
    }
</script>
<div id="ElementToChange" onmouseover="changetext();" onmouseout="changetextback();">original text</div>
-2

Yes, that is a standard function of Javascript to handle HTML DOM events. Using simple HTML/Javascript, you can attach an onmouseover event handler to run a Javascript function:

<html>
<head>
    <script>
        function changeText(obj){
            // https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Node.textContent
            obj.textContent = "some new text";

            // you could also use obj.innerHTML here, but 
            // that comes with security considerations
            // https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Element.innerHTML
        }
    </script>
</head>
<body>
<div id="mydiv" onmouseover="changeText(this)">Some text</div>
</body>
</html>

There are convenience functions in Javascript frameworks like jQuery as well:

$(obj).text('Some new text from jQuery');

Note that you need to include the jQuery library in your <head> block to use it.

Attaching event handlers to DOM events via inline properties like onmouseover may result in harder to manage code over the long run. Attaching event listeners via code is better:

<html>
<head>
    <script>
        function changeText(event){
            // the Event object - here called event as a variable name
            // is passed implicitly
                event.target.textContent = "some new text";
            }

            window.onload = function(){
                document.getElementById("mydiv")
                    .addEventListener("mouseover", changeText, false );
            }
    </script>
</head>
<body>
<div id="mydiv">Some text</div>
</body>
</html>

jQuery makes it easy:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $("#mydiv")
        .on( "mouseover", function(event){
            $(event.target).text('some new text');
    });
});

I suggest you Google Javascript tutorials and go through an HTML/Javascript beginner's tutorial. Mozilla Developer Network is a good place to start learning:

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/

If you really get interested in it, check out NodeJS for server-side Javascript:

http://nodejs.org/

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