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I'm playing around with different ways of integrating D3 and Angular, in the context of learning both of these frameworks, and am hoping for some input:

My client application receives a JSON array of nodes and an array of edges from my server. The central component of the client is a graph visualization implemented as a D3 force-directed layout: For each node in the nodes array, a (SVG) circle element is added to this visualization, and lines between these circles are added for each edge in the edges array.

Of course, D3's selection.data( ) makes it trivial to add these elements and bind each to the data it represents, but the graph visualization is only part of a much larger application: I need to create different types of elements representing these same nodes and edges in different parts of the application (which D3 has nothing to do with), and I'd like to keep all of these elements bound to a single dataset.

My primary goal is minimizing code complexity, and - although I've fallen in love with the simplicity and elegance of D3's data-binding functionality - I've arrived at the tentative conclusion that using it in one part of the application while using Angular to do the same in other parts is creating unnecessary complexity, and that the simplest approach would be to use Angular to handle the data-binding/element-creation

In other words, instead of using selection.data( ).enter( ).append( ) to create SVG elements, I'm thinking I should do so using a ng-repeat="node in nodes", perhaps creating each as a custom directive to allow for custom functionality. Having done so, I would then need to get these elements "into" D3, i.e. managed by its force-directed layout.

Is my reasoning here sound? In particular, I'm worried that I'm overlooking complications this will create with regard to object constancy, which is an important requirement as nodes will be entering, exiting and moving about the screen constantly and I need these transitions to be smooth. How would you recommend I go about integrating my angular-created elements into D3 (more precisely, getting them into my force.nodes{ } and force.links( ) arrays) to avoid any such complications?

Finally, I'm also considering a strategy that I'm hoping might give me the best of both worlds: I could use D3 to create my SVG elements and bind them to their respective datum, but rather than executing that code in the link function of visualization directive (as I've been doing, and as all the Angular/D3 tutorials I've found do), I could run it in the compile function, and do something like this:

d3.select('SVG')
  .selectAll('.node')
  .data('nodeDataArray')
  .enter( )
  .append('circle')
  .attr("class", "node-icon"); //...other attributes/styles etc  

where node-icon is the normalized name of a directive with a restrict property that includes C. If this runs in the compile method, angular should then compile all of these directives as normal, adding any additional functionality / interfaces with other directives (etc.), the same way it does with any other type of element. Right?

This is the option I'm most attracted to intuitively - are there any pitfalls of it I might be overlooking, which might make the former strategy preferable?

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  • This seems to be working really well as far as angular-d3 integration goes: github.com/n3-charts/line-chart. Not directly realated to your question but one might use it as reference if one were so inclined. Apr 28, 2014 at 9:39
  • 1
    My experience with D3 and Angular has been that you should only have one master when it comes to data-binding. You can recreate D3 functionality in Angular, but it becomes a question of how far down the rabbit hole you want to go with that. A simple bar chart can easily be done with ng-repeat and simple SVG. But a force chart will require a lot more coding to replicate in Angular.
    – Sharondio
    May 20, 2014 at 14:29
  • Re: restrict, yes, and it seems to work well enough in practice. In our case we use attr to attach whichever directives we want, allowing us to get "back into Angular" from d3. For instance .attr('ng-tip', 'An {{ interpolated }} tip.'). Then we simply $compile(svg) (where svg is the actual node).
    – Zach Snow
    Jun 2, 2014 at 16:45
  • In the context of angular 2, how these things change? Can we keep angular and D3 separate? D3 code is quite different from Angular and should we encapsulate that in a Angular component and let the component interact with the rest of app to get data and send events?
    – Harshal
    Jun 18, 2018 at 5:50

1 Answer 1

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I have been pondering pretty much the same problem for a while and come to the following conclusion.

The simplest way to integrate Angular created elements with d3 is to add the directives with .attr and then .call the compile service on the d3 generated elements. Like this:

mySvg.selectAll("circle")
                .data(scope.nodes)
                .enter()
                .append("circle")
                .attr("tooltip-append-to-body", true)
                .attr("tooltip", function(d){
                    return d.name;
                })
                .call(function(){
                    $compile(this[0].parentNode)(scope);
                });

Here is a Plunker.

I think the idea of generating elements with Angular ngRepeat rather than d3 is working against the frameworks. D3 does not expect to be handed a bunch of elements. It wants to be handed data - almost always an array. It then has a stack of excellent functions to convert that data into various SVG or HTML elements. Let it do that.

It seems from this quote...

D3 makes it trivial to add elements and bind each to the data it represents, but the graph visualization is only part of a much larger application: I need to create different types of elements representing these same nodes and edges in different parts of the application (which D3 has nothing to do with), and I'd like to keep all of these elements bound to a single dataset.

... you are implying that generating elements with d3 somehow prevents you from binding the same data to different parts of the application. I can't see why. Just have d3 generate elements from a scope array (as is done in the linked Plunker). Then use the same dataset wherever you want in the usual Angular way. Other parts of the application can update the dataset and a $watch callback can re-render the d3 graphic.

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