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I have a ToString() method I need to run but need to use loops instead of if and else statements. How should i do it?

public String toString() 
    {

        if (collectedDots == 0)
            return "Player[]"+"("+x+","+Math.abs(y)+")";
        else if (collectedDots == 1)
            return "Player["+"*"+"]"+"("+x+","+Math.abs(y)+")";
        else if (collectedDots == 2)
            return "Player["+"**"+"]"+"("+x+","+Math.abs(y)+")";
        else 
            return "Player["+"***"+"]"+"("+x+","+Math.abs(y)+")";

    }
  • Why do you want to use loop here. Switch case would be a better option to use in this case – ankhuri Apr 23 '14 at 2:48
  • How would I do it? It's about printing a specific number of characters. Give it a thought. After all, it's your homework. – devnull Apr 23 '14 at 2:49
  • @ankhuri switch is not ideal, because (1) it limits the number of collectedDots to the highest case in your switch, and (2) it makes you repeat essentially the same concatenation code several times. – dasblinkenlight Apr 23 '14 at 2:55
  • for fun, for(;condition;){statment; break;} works as an if statement but never needed – Old Badman Grey Apr 23 '14 at 2:55
  • First off, use a temp for Math.abs(y) to remove that clutter and let you see more clearly what you're doing. – Hot Licks Apr 23 '14 at 2:57
0

Write a loop that produces a string of collectedDots asterisks:

String asterisks = "";
// Here is your loop. It iterates "collectedDots" times
for (int i = 0 ; i != collectedDots ; i++) {
    // Append an asterisk to the string "asterisks"; I assume that you know how to do that
}

With asterisks string in hand, the rest of your toString becomes trivial:

return "Player["+asterisks+"]"+"("+x+","+Math.abs(y)+")";
  • Append an asterisk to the string "asterisks"; no idea – user3562745 Apr 23 '14 at 2:54
  • @user3562745 Well, asterisks = asterisks + "*" will do it - you've used string concatenation + in your code, so I assumed that you know how to append a character to a string. – dasblinkenlight Apr 23 '14 at 2:58
  • i != collectedDots is not good design. While it works, it isn't as clear as i < collectedDots. – dharms Apr 23 '14 at 3:01
  • @dcharms Yes. Here is why: link. – dasblinkenlight Apr 23 '14 at 3:02
  • Thanks this really helped – user3562745 Apr 23 '14 at 3:03
0

you can use switch instead of if

switch(collectedDots )
{
case 0:        return "Player[]"+"("+x+","+Math.abs(y)+")";
case 1:        return "Player["+"*"+"]"+"("+x+","+Math.abs(y)+")";
case 2:        return "Player["+"**"+"]"+"("+x+","+Math.abs(y)+")";
default:         return "Player["+"***"+"]"+"("+x+","+Math.abs(y)+")";
}
  • 3
    It's a homework. If you have to post, use a loop. – devnull Apr 23 '14 at 2:50
0

Spent more time looking at your out put.

Did your teacher teach how to print the following pattern in class?

(nothing)

A

AA

AAA

public static void main(String[] args) {
    StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
    for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
        System.out.println(stringBuilder.toString());
        stringBuilder.append("*");
    }
}
  • No i want taught that append?? – user3562745 Apr 23 '14 at 2:55
  • those are the behind the scenes and efficient use of str+="*"; though that could be used too – Old Badman Grey Apr 23 '14 at 2:58

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