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I'm trying to implement a very simple tcp server/client which should do this: S:listens on port C:connects S:send "hello, type the password" C:gets message, sends password S:answers "right" or "wrong" in case of right/wrong password from the client.

I hope this is clear.

How would I do this in C? I used Beej's Guide to sockets programming and just changed the Code a bit. Server:

i = send(new_fd, "Hello, world!", 13, 0);
printf("send returned %d\n", i);

char* buf;
recv(new_fd, buf, MAX_BUF_SIZE - 1, 0);
buf[MAX_BUF_SIZE] = '\0';
if (!strncmp(buf, "lol", 3)) //the pw is lol
{
   send(new_fd, "right", 11, 0); 
   printf("logged in\n");
}
else
{
   // ...as above...
}
close(new_fd);

The Client works correspondingly. Can't I mix recvs and sends? Neither the send after the recv on the client-side works, nor does the recv after the send on the server-side. What am I missing? Hope this is clear enough.

4
  • In what way does it not work? The code that you posted looks like it'll crash when it gets to the recv call, because buf is an invalid pointer. Commented Apr 23, 2014 at 6:35
  • Ahhh. You're totally right. I didn't give it an appropriate size. Thats what you meant by invalid, right? Anyway, works fine now. Thank you very much.
    – jjstcool
    Commented Apr 23, 2014 at 6:40
  • I don't know what is not working, make it a little bit clear, but I'll give you a couple of advices, first you should reserve memory for your buf, something like buf = (char*) malloc (sizeof(char)*MAX_BUF_SIZE); After that, don't trust the data inside of the buffer and use memclear before send and recv
    – Izuel
    Commented Apr 23, 2014 at 6:41
  • 1
    @izuel There is no need to clear buffers. It's a complete waste of time. You only have to be aware how much data you've actually received.
    – user207421
    Commented Apr 23, 2014 at 7:38

1 Answer 1

0
char* buf;

Instant SIGSEGV when you use this. Make it

char buf[MAX_BUF_SIZE];

Then:

recv(new_fd, buf, MAX_BUF_SIZE - 1, 0);
buf[MAX_BUF_SIZE] = '\0';

You're ignoring the value returned by recv().

int count = recv(new_fd, buf, MAX_BUF_SIZE - 1, 0);
if (count == 0)
{
    // peer has closed the connection
    close(new_fd);
    return;
}
if (count == -1)
{
    // I/O error
    perror("recv");
    close(new_fd);
    return;
}
// All good: you received 'count' bytes
buf[count] = '\0';

Note that count, if positive, may be anything between 1 and MAX_BUF_SIZE-1. The recv() function isn't obliged to fill your buffer, receive an entire 'message', etc.

1
  • Yes, I fixed it now, this was the problem to not allocate space for my char pointer. For the sake of simplicity I left the checking out of my above code. I do that on my own code. It works fine now. Thanks. There was no segfault, however. Why wouldn't my program segfault? Because I didn't leave my memory space the OS gave the process?
    – jjstcool
    Commented Apr 23, 2014 at 15:39

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