25

A Brief Explanation

I have created a responsive website that effectively has three views (desktop,tablet,mobile). Most of the design is changed via CSS using media queries (as it should be for responsive websites). However, part of the design is too complex to simply be manipulated via CSS as the HTML actually needs to be moved around the DOM. I know this doesn't sound too great but I cannot see how else I am meant to replicate this design without moving certain elements within my HTML.

So, with the above in mind, I now plan to write a function that creates custom events for each of the different ‘responsive views’. When each event is fired (in sync with the CSS media queries), it will execute some Javascript to move/animate any elements that cannot be manipulated enough using CSS.

My Question

Is this the best method to go about doing this? If, not, what other options do I have? Are there any existing libraries that I could look at and learn from?

My actual question is; What is the best method of moving elements in the DOM for responsive web design?

Further Explanation

If the above wasn’t clear, then read the following:

Consider these three different views:

Responsive Views

Now consider the code for the first two views:

Desktop

<div id="some_container">
    <nav>
        <ul>
        </ul>
    <nav>
    <p>Some Text</p>
    <!-- The rest of the content -->
</div>

Tablet

<div id="some_container">
    <p>Some Text</p>
    <nav>
        <ul>
        </ul>
    <nav>
    <!-- The rest of the content -->
</div>

Notice the nav tag has been moved below the p tag...

  • 3
    I'd just add either the nav or the the text twice, then display only the one you want, depending on media queries. – Cerbrus Apr 23 '14 at 8:23
  • @Cerbrus that will increase load time..... and ideally not good idea... – Bhojendra Rauniyar Apr 23 '14 at 8:27
  • 2
    @C-link By very, very, very little. – MackieeE Apr 23 '14 at 8:28
  • @C-link: The difference in load time is very insignificant. It would be similar to a page having a paragraph of text extra. Maybe it's an extra 2kB to load. – Cerbrus Apr 23 '14 at 8:34
  • 1
    @C-link: I'm having trouble comprehending your question. "put many times in different places"? – Cerbrus Apr 23 '14 at 8:40
5

You can try this:

Assuming this HTML:

<div id="some_container">
    <nav id="n1">
        <ul>
            <li>1</li>
            <li>2</li>
        </ul>
    </nav>
    <p>Some Text</p>
    <nav id="n2">
        <ul>
            <li>1</li>
            <li>2</li>
        </ul>
    </nav>
</div>

You will only need the following css:

#n1{
    display:none;
}

@media only screen 
and (min-width : 600px) {
    #n1{
        display:block;
    }
    #n2{
        display:none;
    }
}

Fiddle example

This basically toggles which of the two navigation sections you see, depending on the screen size. It has the disadvantage of duplicated html in your source (the difference in the amount of data is really negligible), but you won't need JavaScript to get the effect, and JS disabled devices will only show one ul.

The great thing about this way is that it's very scale-able. Need this "effect" on a different page? You'll only have to edit [u]that[/u] page. No messing around with JavaScript, hard-coding new classes / cases.

  • 7
    I did consider this method but I just don't like the idea of having repetitive HTML... – Ben Carey Apr 23 '14 at 8:30
  • @BenCarey: How many characters is that nav? I'm absolutely certain the performance difference is negligible. – Cerbrus Apr 23 '14 at 8:32
  • That is very true and fair, but this is just an example. The site has several elements that need to be moved around, I am just not that confident it is the best method... Not to mention it makes the code harder, albeit it very little, to maintain – Ben Carey Apr 23 '14 at 8:37
  • 1
    In all honesty, the reason I did not originally use this method was because I did not want duplicate code, and I felt it wasn't the most effective solution. But, having now looked at it further I feel it may be the better solution. Simply because it load the pages as it is meant to look, it does not need to wait for jQuery to load to move the elements, I can handle the animations within the CSS, it doesn't affect the load time and it doesn't make the code much harder to maintain. And lastly, I have been advised by someone with a rep of 13k so I feel inclined to trust what you say :-) – Ben Carey Apr 23 '14 at 8:53
  • 3
    but duplicated content is super bad for SEO – liding Dec 8 '14 at 19:46
5

I would suggest you use .insertAfter() and .resize()/.ready() to move the elements based on the page size:

$(window).resize(){
    resize();
}

$(document).ready(){
    resize();
}

function resize(){
    if($(window).width() < 480)
    {
        //Mobile
        $("#some_container nav").insertAfter("#some_container p");
    }
    else if($(window).width() < 800)
    {
        //Tablet
        $("#some_container nav").insertAfter("#some_container p");
    }
    else
    {
        //Desktop
        //Leave original layout
    }
}
  • This is a very basic version of the function I plan to write. The issues occur when I want to go from desktop->mobile (skipping tablet) etc... – Ben Carey Apr 23 '14 at 8:31
  • What issue are you having? – David Apr 23 '14 at 8:31
  • To be honest, there is no issue, I can very easily write this code. I just want to be sure that this is the best method for achieving what I have explained. – Ben Carey Apr 23 '14 at 8:33
  • 4
    Best is subjective. I can only offer you a good, working solution. – David Apr 23 '14 at 8:33
  • 1
    The solution would need to account for all cases, but so what? The same applies to a CSS solution. He would have to explicitly place the copy exactly where he wants it in the source. From what it looks like, there will be a limited number of cases, so the "what if he has over 9000 different cases?" is irrelevant. That'd be ridiculous. – David Apr 23 '14 at 8:59
4

The enquire.js library solves this problem by allowing you to fire JS functions in response to CSS media queries. So you could run your detach() and append() logic according to different screen sizes. It is lightweight to boot.

See: http://wicky.nillia.ms/enquire.js/

2

There are many methods like appendTo

//check for the window width
if($(window).width() < 700){
  //append to the p  
  $('#some_container nav').appendTo('#some_container p');
}
  • Thank you for your answer but I am aware of how to append the DOM and move elements around based on window size, what I would like to know is whether it is the best method for achieving this in sync with the CSS media queries? – Ben Carey Apr 23 '14 at 8:27
  • with css media query you cannot move the elements as @Cerbus said you have to do like that.... – Bhojendra Rauniyar Apr 23 '14 at 8:30
  • if you mean media query with js that's good. just search about that you'll find a lot of results on that.... – Bhojendra Rauniyar Apr 23 '14 at 8:31
1

Creating duplicate content to solve responsive design challenges is not a best practice. It makes the markup harder to maintain (especially when another developer takes over the project and doesn't realize it has to be updated in more than one location), it increases file size (if file size wasn't important, we wouldn't minify our CSS/JS or GZIP our HTML), and assistive technologies and other web agents that don't take CSS into account see it as repeated content.

It's just messy, and I don't see how anyone would consider it a best practice.

While JavaScript isn't ideal either, I see no issue if it is used as a form of progressive enhancement. I recently found myself using it often enough that I created a jQuery plugin for it: https://github.com/thomashigginbotham/responsive-dom

Sample usage:

var $mainNav = $('.main-nav');

$mainNav.responsiveDom({
    appendTo: '.sidebar',
    mediaQuery: '(min-width: 600px)'
});
0

I've just written a jQuery plugin which does exactly this, have a look here. Basically it automatically builds a series of layouts in terms of rows and columns, which are then used for the different views as you show above

0

I am doing this exact thing right now with navigation that I need to move into the header for desktop and just below the header for a hamburger menu on mobile. I have an event listener on the window being resized that calls a function that checks screen size and passes it to my toggleNavigation function. I have this separate because I have a few other functions aside from that that get called in the checkBreakPoint that are not listed. Then to make sure that it is not constantly moving my dom or re-appending it I first check what parent container it is in and only move it if it is not in the one I expect for that screensize. My project requires that it not have any external dependencies so this is just done in plain Javascript and then I use media queries to style the elements based on screen size.

var mainNav = document.getElementById('rww_main_nav'); //element I want to move
var tieredHeader = document.getElementById('rww_tiered_header'); //where it should be on mobile
var branding = document.getElementById('rww_branding'); //where it should be on desktop

window.addEventListener("resize", checkBreakPoint);

function checkBreakPoint() {
        //width of viewport
        var w = Math.max(document.documentElement.clientWidth, window.innerWidth || 0);
        toggleNavLocation(w);
}

function toggleNavLocation(screensize) {
    if (screensize > 999) {
        if (mainNav.parentElement.id === 'rww_tiered_header') {
            branding.appendChild(mainNav);
        }
    } else {
        if (mainNav.parentElement.id === 'rww_branding') {
            tieredHeader.appendChild(mainNav);
        }
    }
}
0

If you don't want to make javascript, use grid technique.

<div class="main_container">
    <nav class="grid_nav">
        <ul>
        </ul>
    <nav>
    <div class="grid_text">
        <p>Some Text</p>
    </div>
    <!-- The rest of the content -->
</div>

.main_container{
  display: grid;
  @media screen and (max-width: 500px) { //mobile
    grid-template-rows:    1fr 1fr;
    grid-template-areas: "gridnav"
                         "gridtext";
  }
  @media screen and (min-width: 500px) {//web
    grid-template-rows:    1fr 1fr;
    grid-template-areas: "gridtext"
                         "gridnav";
  }
}

.grid_nav{
  grid-area: gridnav;
}
.grid_text{
  grid-area: gridtext;
}

But is only when the movements are inside of the "main_container"

regards...

-1

This may introduce a whole new set of problems, but could you use position: absolute on the elements set to move, and have them reposition around the page based on the size of the screen?

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