1

Been reading a lot on StackOverflow and couldn't find any question/answer exact similar to this one. Try to keep it short.

My key problem is how to design a Generic Repository when you have several bounded contexts. I have been using Generic repository before a lot but then I usually close them through for example

public class CustomerRepository : Repository<Customer>

But now I would like to skip these custom queries and aiming instead for using queryhandlers for custom queries like "GetCustomerbyOrderNumber...." and let Repositories be responsible for just working with one entity, in this example Customer.

But when using Bounded Context, which I have done before, I usually register each Entity Framework DBContext per Bounded Context with my IoC (used Castle, AutoMapper and now Simple Injector). But when trying to go for a pure Open Generic Repository approach...

 public class Repository<TEntity> : IRepository<TEntity>
    where TEntity : Entity, IAggregateRoot
{
    #region Members

    private readonly IQueryableUnitOfWork _unitOfWork;

    #endregion

    #region Constructor

    /// <summary>
    ///     Create a new instance of repository
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="unitOfWork">Associated Unit Of Work</param>
    protected Repository(IQueryableUnitOfWork unitOfWork)
    {
        if (unitOfWork == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("unitOfWork");

        _unitOfWork = unitOfWork;
    }

I don't know how to manage Simple Injector to understand what Dbcontext to use. The scenario Will probably be that a ICommandHandler will be injected into a MVC controller. The Implementation AddCustomerCommandHandler will have IRepository injected into constructor. BUT here comes the problem. The implementation Repository takes IQuerableUnitOfWork as dependcy (All Bounded Contexts inherits from a BaseContext that inherits from interface IQuerableUnitOfWork. So that all DBContexts are a IQuerableUnitOfWork).

Somehow I need tell Simple injector to inject ANiceBoundedContexOne (just an example context) into Repository when used with command handlers in the same Bounded context (located in another assembly though). And then using ANiceBoundedContexTwo injected into Repository when using command handlers for that bounded context.

I've done some research and reading and not exactly sure of the capability of Simple Injector but I can see some solution paths:

1) Make a factory and register that in SI. Inject that factory into CommandHandlers and let them get the appropriate Repository.

2) Make more Context specific interface. IContextOneRepository if I refer to example above. Which means that if I have three Bounded Context infrastructure assemblies they can all have their IContextOneRepository, IContextTwoRepository and IContextThreeRepository (name sucks but its just an example). And the Repository implementation is located in a Shared Kernel class library. Simple injector will register three interfaces for that implementation but with different DBContext injected into Repository constructor.

Is there any other nice and smooth way that I haven't thought of?

And have you actually done any of the solutions above with simple injector and how did that worked out?

7
  • I'm not sure about SimpleInjector.. but with Ninject we do this open-generic binding via the Ninject.Extensions.Conventions assembly. This provides type bindings via convention and allows us to bind open generic types by name. Sounds to me like you're after something similar for SimpleInjector. – Simon Whitehead Apr 23 '14 at 8:38
  • Okey. But elaborate a little... So you actually find appropriate DBContext for open generic repository by following some kind of naming convention? – Magnus Backeus Apr 23 '14 at 8:46
  • I'm not sure I follow. A bounded context is typically a single solution managed by a team, and it sounds really weird to me to have multiple bounded contexts within the same running application. If you give each bounded context its own application and composition root, the problem goes away. – Steven Apr 23 '14 at 8:56
  • I know exactly that if these bounded context were "islands" with and live by them self then this would have been an easy case. Now its not like this. I'm architecting a large insurance application that have a complex domain and since I'm using DDD as an approach I used Bounded Context concept within application to avoid Big Ball of Mud problem. We have identified several context within application that will communicate with each other through service layer. – Magnus Backeus Apr 23 '14 at 9:06
  • 1
    Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/19747521/… – Steven Apr 23 '14 at 9:54
2

You don't use a generic repository, period! At most you use a generic repository interface where T is Domain Entity,never EF entity. You don't expose EF or bits of it, it defeats the Repository's purpose (decoupling the Domain from persistence details).

A repository works with aggregate roots (AR) which are valid ONLY in a specific bounded context (BC). A BC is defined by the Domain and it doesn't care about persistence or other implementation detail. Because a BC is an abstract DDD concept, not an actually class. In your BCs do you have the same ARs? If so, it is possible you got the wrong model or some BCs can be merged. Also it DOES matter if you're using CQRS, since you would care only for changing the model (command) and not for queries.

It's a bit hard for me to understand your actual situation as the code seems quite messy, but these are my thoughts:

You have one or more ARs defined. Each AR has a corresponding repository, implemented in DAL, repository which uses EF. The app gets/saves only AR from those repositories (no EF in sight). A Repo for a specific AR doesn't care about other ARs (at least from the interface point of view, it's fine if you want to use the same implementation for all).

Your question is about how to use a Di Container but it's like asking: what chainsaw brand is better to cut the tree branch I'm standing on. None, the objective is wrong to start with.

No offense, but I get the feeling you are using a very flawed version of DDD i.e you're not doing proper DDD and as a result, your code is pretty complicated and it seems low maintainability.

7
  • I do appreciate your DDD concerns and this was more of a infrastructure/technical question how to in a good approach use several DBContexts. I do believe I have quit good knowledge about DDD and have practice it for a while. We do have a good model, with AR's containing Value Obejcts. We are raising Domain events to prevent some business logic/ coordination to leak out to client. Regards to Bounded Context I've used that for more of a Strategic Design to identify Bounded Context and minimize large object models. We use Domain Integration pattern to refer to other BC's through Value objects. – Magnus Backeus Apr 23 '14 at 14:45
  • Regards to complexity. Thats what I'm trying to prevent. You usually find a lot of CustomerRepository, OrderRepository etc with custom queries that actually break SRP if you look at what repository pattern are intended to do. Usually you end up with some epic repositories that do quering for you. Being able to both decorate Queryhandlers, Repository and Commandhandlers give you an extremely DRY and SOLID base to begin with. That's what I'm trying to accomplish... but with Bounded Contexts. Since we have several BC that share kernel (common lib) we have same Repositoty<T> for some BC. – Magnus Backeus Apr 23 '14 at 14:51
  • 1
    With CQRS the Repo only has Get(id) and maybe another get method, but that's it. Complex queries are implemented in a query handler using a read model. The Domain doesn't need complex queries, since it works with ARs directly. But I think I understand what you are after: you want to keep the same repo implementation (queries?) for different DbContexts which will be injected depending on a condition. I think your problem might be the EF hammer. I think a doc store or event sourcing are much better suited for what you want. – MikeSW Apr 23 '14 at 14:58
  • 1
    True that Mike! Now we're sharing same view. Yes our Write part is through our Commands and Repositories. And yes, only Get(id) method and no queries in repository. The quering is taking care of through Read part which is bypassing Repositories just quering and transforming domain into renormalized view objects. We will not use NoSql db's or Event sourcing, even if I would like to. But our query handlers will read from same sql server as write part is writing to. However it will makes the read part easier and we can easily decorate query handlers with caching etc. – Magnus Backeus Apr 24 '14 at 12:07
  • 1
    I see you really want to use EF (or ORM) for command and it looks like it's the compilcated solution. You can still use a rdbms like a doc db if you serialize the entities. Then you'll have only one repository implementation, but you need to maintain the read model as well, only that in this case it won't matter contexts, rules etc. Personally this is what I prefer to do. – MikeSW Apr 24 '14 at 14:33
-1

Here two context in same unitofwork class.Try this i hope this will help you.

    public class UnitOfWorks : IUnitOfWorks
                {
                     ///Context one        
                    private readonly TodosContexts todoContext = new TodosContexts();

                     ///Context Second
                    private readonly CustomerContext customerContext = new CustomerContext(); 

                    /// <summary>
                    /// Flag to show disposed of not.
                    /// </summary>
                    private bool disposed = false;

                    /// First context
                    private IItemRepository itemRepository;

                    /// Second context       
                private ICustomerRepository customerRepository;

                    public IItemRepository ItemRepository
                    {
                        get { return this.itemRepository ?? (this.itemRepository = new  ItemRepository(this.context)); }
                    }



                    public ICustomerRepository CustomerRepository
                    {
                        get { return this.customerRepository ?? (this.customerRepository = new                     CustomerRepository(this.customerContext)); }
                    }
                }

                public class GenericRepository<TEntity> : IGenericRepository<TEntity> where TEntity : class
                {
                    /// <summary>
                    /// Gets or sets CoreDBContext information.
                    /// </summary>
                    public DbContext Context { get; set; }

                    /// <summary>
                    /// Gets or sets Database Entity set information.
                    /// </summary>
                    public DbSet<TEntity> DBSet { get; set; }

                    /// <summary>
                    /// Initialises a new instance of the  <see cref="GenericRepository {TEntity}" /> class.
                    /// </summary>
                    /// <param name="contextValue">Context information.</param>
                    public GenericRepository(DbContext contextValue)
                    {
                        this.Context = contextValue;
                        this.DBSet = this.Context.Set<TEntity>();
                    }
               }


public class CustomerRepository : GenericRepository<Customer>, ICustomerRepository
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Initialises a new instance of the <see cref="CommentRepository" /> class.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="contextValue">The context value.</param>
        public CustomerRepository(CustomerContext contextValue)
            : base(contextValue)
        {
            if (this.Context == null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("Context is null.");
            }
        }
    }
1
  • Thanks Raja for your answer. But my problem lies more in how to wire things up with Simple injector. I do realize how you thinking. But I my mindset I believe we're not gonna do a UnitOfWork across several bounded contexts. Since you do not need to implement UoW pattern because EF supports it out of the box I let each DBContext expose its Commit() method. – Magnus Backeus Apr 23 '14 at 14:21

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.