39

I have a two-dimensional array (of Strings) which make up my data table (of rows and columns). I want to sort this array by any column. I tried to find an algorithm for doing this in C#, but have not been successful.

Any help is appreciated.

0

15 Answers 15

48

Can I check - do you mean a rectangular array ([,])or a jagged array ([][])?

It is quite easy to sort a jagged array; I have a discussion on that here. Obviously in this case the Comparison<T> would involve a column instead of sorting by ordinal - but very similar.

Sorting a rectangular array is trickier... I'd probably be tempted to copy the data out into either a rectangular array or a List<T[]>, and sort there, then copy back.

Here's an example using a jagged array:

static void Main()
{  // could just as easily be string...
    int[][] data = new int[][] { 
        new int[] {1,2,3}, 
        new int[] {2,3,4}, 
        new int[] {2,4,1} 
    }; 
    Sort<int>(data, 2); 
} 
private static void Sort<T>(T[][] data, int col) 
{ 
    Comparer<T> comparer = Comparer<T>.Default;
    Array.Sort<T[]>(data, (x,y) => comparer.Compare(x[col],y[col])); 
} 

For working with a rectangular array... well, here is some code to swap between the two on the fly...

static T[][] ToJagged<T>(this T[,] array) {
    int height = array.GetLength(0), width = array.GetLength(1);
    T[][] jagged = new T[height][];

    for (int i = 0; i < height; i++)
    {
        T[] row = new T[width];
        for (int j = 0; j < width; j++)
        {
            row[j] = array[i, j];
        }
        jagged[i] = row;
    }
    return jagged;
}
static T[,] ToRectangular<T>(this T[][] array)
{
    int height = array.Length, width = array[0].Length;
    T[,] rect = new T[height, width];
    for (int i = 0; i < height; i++)
    {
        T[] row = array[i];
        for (int j = 0; j < width; j++)
        {
            rect[i, j] = row[j];
        }
    }
    return rect;
}
// fill an existing rectangular array from a jagged array
static void WriteRows<T>(this T[,] array, params T[][] rows)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < rows.Length; i++)
    {
        T[] row = rows[i];
        for (int j = 0; j < row.Length; j++)
        {
            array[i, j] = row[j];
        }
    }
}
4
  • What changes needs to be done in Sort method to sort data in descending mode.
    – Homam
    Jan 24, 2019 at 11:47
  • 2
    @Homam comparer.Compare(y[col],x[col])) (reverse x and y there) Jan 24, 2019 at 15:08
  • No doubt, a good suggestion for sure. However, strange is that I don't find any good solution for an object[,] type array anywhere, which may consist any type of data element. The praiseworthy solution provided works fine if either the sorting key column is either string or long but not, if the same comprises of a mix of data type. Any suggestion in respect of sample like: new int[] {1,2,3}, new int[] {2,3,"Ba"}, new int[] {2,4,"aA"} ? Feb 19, 2023 at 18:01
  • 1
    @FarazAhmedQureshi most sort APIs accept a comparer - so: provide a comparer that does what you want Feb 19, 2023 at 23:35
25

Load your two-dimensional string array into an actual DataTable (System.Data.DataTable), and then use the DataTable object's Select() method to generate a sorted array of DataRow objects (or use a DataView for a similar effect).

// assumes stringdata[row, col] is your 2D string array
DataTable dt = new DataTable();
// assumes first row contains column names:
for (int col = 0; col < stringdata.GetLength(1); col++)
{
    dt.Columns.Add(stringdata[0, col]);
}
// load data from string array to data table:
for (rowindex = 1; rowindex < stringdata.GetLength(0); rowindex++)
{
    DataRow row = dt.NewRow();
    for (int col = 0; col < stringdata.GetLength(1); col++)
    {
        row[col] = stringdata[rowindex, col];
    }
    dt.Rows.Add(row);
}
// sort by third column:
DataRow[] sortedrows = dt.Select("", "3");
// sort by column name, descending:
sortedrows = dt.Select("", "COLUMN3 DESC");

You could also write your own method to sort a two-dimensional array. Both approaches would be useful learning experiences, but the DataTable approach would get you started on learning a better way of handling tables of data in a C# application.

3
  • That sounds interesting, can you post or link to some code examples please.
    – Jack
    Oct 24, 2008 at 3:59
  • Done. It might have a bug somewhere - I wrote it in notepad. Oct 24, 2008 at 4:15
  • Amazed you wrote that in notepad - at any rate, it worked very well. Thank you.
    – Jack
    Oct 24, 2008 at 5:00
10
Array.Sort(array, (a, b) => { return a[0] - b[0]; });
2
  • Welcome to SO. Please do not post code only answers. As the code is simple to you, others might struggle to understand it and why you used that approach. Please elaborate on your code why you did it that way. Also, please notice that this question is from 2008.
    – Korashen
    Nov 22, 2019 at 23:51
  • @Korashen: You got a good suggestion. Would you please tell me if that line of code will first sort the whole array by the first index, and then next will sort the whole array by the second index of the array ? Does this require "using System.Linq" ? Thanks. Mar 14, 2021 at 20:36
7

Here is an archived article from Jim Mischel at InformIt that handles sorting for both rectangular and jagged multi-dimensional arrays.

4
  • That example doesn't actually sort the array; the LINQ will produce a sorted sequence, but only if you capture the result... it doesn't sort the existing array. This could just be: string[] names = {"Smith","Snyder","Baker","Jonson","Ballmer"}; Array.Sort(names); Oct 24, 2008 at 3:46
  • I can see what you're saying - I'll remove the flawed example, but leave in the link to the sorting article. PS - thank you for telling me the reason for the down vote. You don't see that often but it truely IS constructive!
    – Doug L.
    Oct 24, 2008 at 3:58
  • Link is broken. It redirects to the website's homepage
    – KFL
    Jan 22, 2018 at 18:46
  • Thank you KFL, I edited the link to point to an archived version. As much as I would prefer to link to a current version on the InformIT site for them, I can not easily find that content. It seems to have been removed.
    – Doug L.
    Jan 29, 2018 at 4:17
1
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int[,] arr = { { 20, 9, 11 }, { 30, 5, 6 } };
            Console.WriteLine("before");
            for (int i = 0; i < arr.GetLength(0); i++)
            {
                for (int j = 0; j < arr.GetLength(1); j++)
                {
                    Console.Write("{0,3}", arr[i, j]);
                }
                Console.WriteLine();
            }
            Console.WriteLine("After");

            for (int i = 0; i < arr.GetLength(0); i++) // Array Sorting
            {
                for (int j = arr.GetLength(1) - 1; j > 0; j--)
                {

                    for (int k = 0; k < j; k++)
                    {
                        if (arr[i, k] > arr[i, k + 1])
                        {
                            int temp = arr[i, k];
                            arr[i, k] = arr[i, k + 1];
                            arr[i, k + 1] = temp;
                        }
                    }
                }
                Console.WriteLine();
            }

            for (int i = 0; i < arr.GetLength(0); i++)
            {
                for (int j = 0; j < arr.GetLength(1); j++)
                {
                    Console.Write("{0,3}", arr[i, j]);
                }
                Console.WriteLine();
            }
        }
    }
}
1

This code should do what you are after, I haven't generalised it for n by n, but that is straight forward. That said - I agree with MusiGenesis, using another object that is a little better suited to this (especially if you intend to do any sort of binding)

(I found the code here)

string[][] array = new string[3][];

array[0] = new string[3] { "apple", "apple", "apple" };
array[1] = new string[3] { "banana", "banana", "dog" };
array[2] = new string[3] { "cat", "hippo", "cat" };         

for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
{
   Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0} {1} {2}", array[i][0], array[i][1], array[i][2]));
}

int j = 2;

Array.Sort(array, delegate(object[] x, object[] y)
  {
    return (x[j] as IComparable).CompareTo(y[ j ]);
  }
);

for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
{
  Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0} {1} {2}", array[i][0], array[i][1], array[i][2]));
}
1

Can allso look at Array.Sort Method http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa311213(v=vs.71).aspx

e.g. Array.Sort(array, delegate(object[] x, object[] y){ return (x[ i ] as IComparable).CompareTo(y[ i ]);});

from http://channel9.msdn.com/forums/Coffeehouse/189171-Sorting-Two-Dimensional-Arrays-in-C/

1
  • Hi No_Nick, if I have a 2 dimensional array, and I want do 2 sorting on this array at the same time : (1) First, sort by the first index; (2) Next for all elements that have the same values for the first index, please sort them by the second index; -- Would you please tell me how to do that with Array.Sort() as you wrote ? Thank you. Mar 14, 2021 at 20:50
0

So your array is structured like this (I'm gonna talk in pseudocode because my C#-fu is weak, but I hope you get the gist of what I'm saying)

string values[rows][columns]

So value[1][3] is the value at row 1, column 3.

You want to sort by column, so the problem is that your array is off by 90 degrees.

As a first cut, could you just rotate it?

std::string values_by_column[columns][rows];

for (int i = 0; i < rows; i++)
  for (int j = 0; j < columns; j++)
    values_by_column[column][row] = values[row][column]

sort_array(values_by_column[column])

for (int i = 0; i < rows; i++)
  for (int j = 0; j < columns; j++)
    values[row][column] = values_by_column[column][row]

If you know you only want to sort one column at a time, you could optimize this a lot by just extracting the data you want to sort:

  string values_to_sort[rows]
  for (int i = 0; i < rows; i++)
    values_to_sort[i] = values[i][column_to_sort]

  sort_array(values_to_sort)

  for (int i = 0; i < rows; i++)
    values[i][column_to_sort] = values_to_sort[i]

In C++ you could play tricks with how to calculate offsets into the array (since you could treat your two-dimensional array as a one-d array) but I'm not sure how to do that in c#.

0

Try this out. The basic strategy is to sort the particular column independently and remember the original row of the entry. The rest of the code will cycle through the sorted column data and swap out the rows in the array. The tricky part is remembing to update the original column as the swap portion will effectively alter the original column.


        public class Pair<T> {
            public int Index;
            public T Value;
            public Pair(int i, T v) {
                Index = i;
                Value = v;
            }
        }
        static IEnumerable<Pair<T>> Iterate<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source) {
            int index = 0;
            foreach ( var cur in source) {
                yield return new Pair<T>(index,cur);
                index++;
            }
        }
        static void Sort2d(string[][] source, IComparer comp, int col) {
            var colValues = source.Iterate()
                .Select(x => new Pair<string>(x.Index,source[x.Index][col])).ToList();
            colValues.Sort((l,r) => comp.Compare(l.Value, r.Value));
            var temp = new string[source[0].Length];
            var rest = colValues.Iterate();
            while ( rest.Any() ) {
                var pair = rest.First();
                var cur = pair.Value;
                var i = pair.Index;
                if (i == cur.Index ) {
                    rest = rest.Skip(1);
                    continue;
                }

                Array.Copy(source[i], temp, temp.Length);
                Array.Copy(source[cur.Index], source[i], temp.Length);
                Array.Copy(temp, source[cur.Index], temp.Length);
                rest = rest.Skip(1);
                rest.Where(x => x.Value.Index == i).First().Value.Index = cur.Index;
            }
        }

        public static void Test1() {
            var source = new string[][] 
            {
                new string[]{ "foo", "bar", "4" },
                new string[] { "jack", "dog", "1" },
                new string[]{ "boy", "ball", "2" },
                new string[]{ "yellow", "green", "3" }
            };
            Sort2d(source, StringComparer.Ordinal, 2);
        }
0

If you could get the data as a generic tuple when you read it in or retrieved it, it would be a lot easier; then you would just have to write a Sort function that compares the desired column of the tuple, and you have a single dimension array of tuples.

0

This is an old question, but here's a class I just built based on the article from Jim Mischel at InformIt linked by Doug L.

class Array2DSort : IComparer<int>
{
    // maintain a reference to the 2-dimensional array being sorted
    string[,] _sortArray;
    int[] _tagArray;
    int _sortIndex;

    protected string[,] SortArray { get { return _sortArray; } }

    // constructor initializes the sortArray reference
    public Array2DSort(string[,] theArray, int sortIndex)
    {
        _sortArray = theArray;
        _tagArray = new int[_sortArray.GetLength(0)];
        for (int i = 0; i < _sortArray.GetLength(0); ++i) _tagArray[i] = i;
        _sortIndex = sortIndex;
    }

    public string[,] ToSortedArray()
    {
        Array.Sort(_tagArray, this);
        string[,] result = new string[
            _sortArray.GetLength(0), _sortArray.GetLength(1)];
        for (int i = 0; i < _sortArray.GetLength(0); i++)
        {
            for (int j = 0; j < _sortArray.GetLength(1); j++)
            {
                result[i, j] = _sortArray[_tagArray[i], j];
            }
        }
        return result;
    }

    // x and y are integer row numbers into the sortArray
    public virtual int Compare(int x, int y)
    {
        if (_sortIndex < 0) return 0;
        return CompareStrings(x, y, _sortIndex);
    }

    protected int CompareStrings(int x, int y, int col)
    {
        return _sortArray[x, col].CompareTo(_sortArray[y, col]);
    }
}

Given an unsorted 2D array data of arbitrary size that you want to sort on column 5 you just do this:

        Array2DSort comparer = new Array2DSort(data, 5);
        string[,] sortedData = comparer.ToSortedArray();

Note the virtual Compare method and protected SortArray so you can create specialized subclasses that always sort on a particular column or do specialized sorting on multiple columns or whatever you want to do. That's also why CompareStrings is broken out and protected - any subclasses can use it for simple comparisons instead of typing out the full SortArray[x, col].CompareTo(SortArray[y, col]) syntax.

0

I like the DataTable approach proposed by MusiGenesis above. The nice thing about it is that you can sort by any valid SQL 'order by' string that uses column names, e.g. "x, y desc, z" for 'order by x, y desc, z'. (FWIW, I could not get it to work using column ordinals, e.g. "3,2,1 " for 'order by 3,2,1') I used only integers, but clearly you could add mixed type data into the DataTable and sort it any which way.

In the example below, I first loaded some unsorted integer data into a tblToBeSorted in Sandbox (not shown). With the table and its data already existing, I load it (unsorted) into a 2D integer array, then to a DataTable. The array of DataRows is the sorted version of DataTable. The example is a little odd in that I load my array from the DB and could have sorted it then, but I just wanted to get an unsorted array into C# to use with the DataTable object.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    SqlConnection cnnX = new SqlConnection("Data Source=r90jroughgarden\\;Initial Catalog=Sandbox;Integrated Security=True");
    SqlCommand cmdX = new SqlCommand("select * from tblToBeSorted", cnnX);
    cmdX.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
    SqlDataReader rdrX = null;
    if (cnnX.State == ConnectionState.Closed) cnnX.Open();

    int[,] aintSortingArray = new int[100, 4];     //i, elementid, planid, timeid

    try
    {
        //Load unsorted table data from DB to array
        rdrX = cmdX.ExecuteReader();
        if (!rdrX.HasRows) return;

        int i = -1;
        while (rdrX.Read() && i < 100)
        {
            i++;
            aintSortingArray[i, 0] = rdrX.GetInt32(0);
            aintSortingArray[i, 1] = rdrX.GetInt32(1);
            aintSortingArray[i, 2] = rdrX.GetInt32(2);
            aintSortingArray[i, 3] = rdrX.GetInt32(3);
        }
        rdrX.Close();

        DataTable dtblX = new DataTable();
        dtblX.Columns.Add("ChangeID");
        dtblX.Columns.Add("ElementID");
        dtblX.Columns.Add("PlanID");
        dtblX.Columns.Add("TimeID");
        for (int j = 0; j < i; j++)
        {
            DataRow drowX = dtblX.NewRow();
            for (int k = 0; k < 4; k++)
            {
                drowX[k] = aintSortingArray[j, k];
            }
            dtblX.Rows.Add(drowX);
        }

        DataRow[] adrowX = dtblX.Select("", "ElementID, PlanID, TimeID");
        adrowX = dtblX.Select("", "ElementID desc, PlanID asc, TimeID desc");

    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        string strErrMsg = ex.Message;
    }
    finally
    {
        if (cnnX.State == ConnectionState.Open) cnnX.Close();
    }
}
0

I know its late but here is my thought you might wanna consider.

for example this is array

{
m,m,m
a,a,a
b,b,b
j,j,j
k,l,m
}

and you want to convert it by column number 2, then

string[] newArr = new string[arr.length]
for(int a=0;a<arr.length;a++)
    newArr[a] = arr[a][1] + a;

// create new array that contains index number at the end and also the column values
Array.Sort(newArr);
for(int a=0;a<newArr.length;a++)
{
    int index = Convert.ToInt32(newArr[a][newArr[a].Length -1]);
    //swap whole row with tow at current index
    if(index != a)
    {
        string[] arr2 = arr[a];
        arr[a] = arr[index];
        arr[index] = arr2;
    }
}

Congratulations you have sorted the array by desired column. You can edit this to make it work with other data types

0

Short way, but be careful of performance in big arrays and must have n-count of columns:

This will order it from the last number to the first. In case of need reverse it from 0 to "hero":

for (int i = n-1; i >= 0; i--)
{
  resultsAsArray = resultsAsArray.OrderBy(x => x[i]).ToArray();
}

Example (do not be surprised, that 3 is first, 2 after that - those are negative, so -3 is lesser than -2)

var original = new int[][] { new int[] { -3, 1, 2 }, new int[] { -2, -1, 3 }, new int[] { -3, -1, 4 }, new int[] { -3, -2, 5 } };

*var processed = new int[][] { new int[] { -3, -2, 5 }, new int[] { -3, -1, 4 }, new int[] { -3, 1, 2 }, new int[] { -2, -1, 3 } };
-1

Assuming it is a jagged array, you can use LINQ or Array.Sort() method to sort it.

Method 1: Using LINQ

var myOrderedRows = myArray.OrderBy(row => row[columnIndex]).ToArray();

Here, LINQ creates a new IEnumerable which needs to be converted to array (using ToArray()) myOrderedRows. Your original array is still unsorted. More details can be found in docs here.

Method 2: Using Array.Sort()

Array.Sort(myArray, (p, q) => p[columnIndex].CompareTo(q[columnIndex]));

In this case your original array is sorted in place. You can also provide custom Comparer for more comparison rules. More details can be found in docs here.

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