23

I want to pin an array of bytes which is 10 megabytes long so that managed and unmanaged code can work on it.

My scenario is that I have an unmanaged driver which reads some data from the device and writes it to the big array and the managed application just reads that data.

Something like this:

byte[] dataArray = new byte[10*1024*1024];

I want to pin dataArray so that GC does not move it.

What happens actually when I just run the application, I get a DataAbortApplication, and after reading on the internet I found out that I should pin the dataArray to avoid this error.

How/what should I do?

4
  • 1
    Check out the fixed statement msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/f58wzh21.aspx
    – Tawnos
    Apr 23, 2014 at 20:45
  • Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/13293133/… ?
    – LB2
    Apr 23, 2014 at 20:46
  • @FabianBigler: you mean I can't share the big array between managed and unmanaged code?
    – ShrShr
    Apr 23, 2014 at 20:46
  • 6
    This array can't move, it is too large so is allocated on the Large Object Heap. Whatever your problem might be is surely related to something else. Your "DataAbortApplication" is a meaningless diagnostic. Apr 23, 2014 at 20:53

2 Answers 2

33

There are 2 ways to do this. The first is to use the fixed statement:

unsafe void UsingFixed()
{
    var dataArray = new byte[10*1024*1024];
    fixed (byte* array = dataArray)
    {
        // array is pinned until the end of the 'fixed' block
    }
}

However, it sounds like you want the array pinned for a longer period of time. You can use GCHandles to accomplish this:

void UsingGCHandles()
{
    var dataArray = new byte[10*1024*1024];
    var handle = GCHandle.Alloc(dataArray, GCHandleType.Pinned);

    // retrieve a raw pointer to pass to the native code:
    IntPtr ptr = handle.ToIntPtr();

    // later, possibly in some other method:
    handle.Free();
}
3
  • 6
    This will work if the managed and unmanaged code is in the same process. To share cross process you would need to use a memory mapped file. Apr 23, 2014 at 20:48
  • 1
    Looks like there have been some changes to the GCHandle API since 2014. Now, it looks like you have to do this: var ptr = GCHandle.ToIntPtr(handle). ToIntPtr appears to have been made static. Sep 28, 2020 at 2:24
  • 1
    Use handle.AddrOfPinnedObject() instead of handle.ToIntPtr()
    – hillin
    Jan 11 at 2:31
3

Here is a class that can be used to pin a byte array until is disposed. However it sounds like a memory mapped file would be more appropriate in your scenario.

public class PinnedBuffer : IDisposable
{
    public GCHandle Handle { get; }
    public byte[] Data { get; private set; }

    public IntPtr Ptr
    {
        get
        {
            return Handle.AddrOfPinnedObject();
        }
    } 

    public PinnedBuffer(byte[] bytes)
    {
        Data = bytes;
        Handle = GCHandle.Alloc(bytes, GCHandleType.Pinned);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (disposing)
        {
            Handle.Free();
            Data = null;
        }
    }
}

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