25

I have installed libeigen3-dev in order to compile programs using Eigen 3. when I include a file, such as Eigen/Dense I get this error when I try to run g++:

user@office-debian:~/Documents/prog$ g++ src/main.cpp -MMD -std=c++11
In file included from src/main.cpp:9:0:
src/tdefs.h:16:23: fatal error: Eigen/Dense: No such file or directory
compilation terminated.

Running the following line works fine:

g++ -I /usr/include/eigen3/ src/main.cpp -MMD -std=c++11

shouldn't that include directory be automatically found by GCC because I installed the Eigen package through aptitude? Why are boost and OpenGL found automatically when I install the libraries but not Eigen? (Note that eigen is a header-only library, but that shouldn't matter right?)

Running g++ src/main.cpp -MMD -std=c++11 --verbose produces the following output:

Using built-in specs.
COLLECT_GCC=g++
COLLECT_LTO_WRAPPER=/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.7/lto-wrapper
Target: x86_64-linux-gnu
Configured with: ../src/configure -v --with-pkgversion='Debian 4.7.2-5' --with-bugurl=file:///usr/share/doc/gcc-4.7/README.Bugs --enable-languages=c,c++,go,fortran,objc,obj-c++ --prefix=/usr --program-suffix=-4.7 --enable-shared --enable-linker-build-id --with-system-zlib --libexecdir=/usr/lib --without-included-gettext --enable-threads=posix --with-gxx-include-dir=/usr/include/c++/4.7 --libdir=/usr/lib --enable-nls --with-sysroot=/ --enable-clocale=gnu --enable-libstdcxx-debug --enable-libstdcxx-time=yes --enable-gnu-unique-object --enable-plugin --enable-objc-gc --with-arch-32=i586 --with-tune=generic --enable-checking=release --build=x86_64-linux-gnu --host=x86_64-linux-gnu --target=x86_64-linux-gnu
Thread model: posix
gcc version 4.7.2 (Debian 4.7.2-5) 
COLLECT_GCC_OPTIONS='-MMD' '-std=c++11' '-v' '-shared-libgcc' '-mtune=generic' '-march=x86-64'
 /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.7/cc1plus -quiet -v -imultiarch x86_64-linux-gnu -MMD main.d -D_GNU_SOURCE src/main.cpp -quiet -dumpbase main.cpp -mtune=generic -march=x86-64 -auxbase main -std=c++11 -version -o /tmp/ccoYRPKY.s
GNU C++ (Debian 4.7.2-5) version 4.7.2 (x86_64-linux-gnu)
    compiled by GNU C version 4.7.2, GMP version 5.0.5, MPFR version 3.1.0-p10, MPC version 0.9
GGC heuristics: --param ggc-min-expand=100 --param ggc-min-heapsize=131072
ignoring nonexistent directory "/usr/local/include/x86_64-linux-gnu"
ignoring nonexistent directory "/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.7/../../../../x86_64-linux-gnu/include"
#include "..." search starts here:
#include <...> search starts here:
 /usr/include/c++/4.7
 /usr/include/c++/4.7/x86_64-linux-gnu
 /usr/include/c++/4.7/backward
 /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.7/include
 /usr/local/include
 /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.7/include-fixed
 /usr/include/x86_64-linux-gnu
 /usr/include
End of search list.
GNU C++ (Debian 4.7.2-5) version 4.7.2 (x86_64-linux-gnu)
    compiled by GNU C version 4.7.2, GMP version 5.0.5, MPFR version 3.1.0-p10, MPC version 0.9
GGC heuristics: --param ggc-min-expand=100 --param ggc-min-heapsize=131072
Compiler executable checksum: 66d178dd81da8c975e003e06d9f5e782
In file included from src/main.cpp:9:0:
src/tdefs.h:16:23: fatal error: Eigen/Dense: No such file or directory
compilation terminated.
8

Run your compiler with the --verbose switch:

g++ --verbose ...

If your includes are relative to one of the paths shown in this output, you don't have to use -I. It depends how gcc has been configured, and it depends where that other stuff is installed.

Note that . is typically not in the -I paths.

Later

After exchanging a couple of comments it is clear that /usr/include/eigen3/Eigen/Dense should be include-able by #include <Eigen/Dense>, but not by #include <eigen3/Eigen/Dense>. Therefore, the addition of the command line option -I /usr/include/eigen3 is mandatory.

Whether some installation selects to install header files into a directory that in one of the ones compiled into gcc, depends on the default, a decision made by the distributor, or a decision made during installation. I'd say that "frequently used" header files (Boost) are well placed into /usr/local/include while some "elitist" stuff would be better off in a directory of its own.

  • I did that and placed the result in the OP. It's clearly including /usr/include. Does that not include subdirectories as well? should I add a symlink to /usr/include/eigen3/Eigen and place it in usr/include/? – quant Apr 25 '14 at 6:59
  • Is your #include naming all of the relative path from /usr/include? There is also a subtle difference between using <...> and "..." around the (relative) pathname. – laune Apr 25 '14 at 7:43
  • No, it's not. But I want my code to be portable (I'll be compiling it on nix and windows systems), so I just did #include <Eigen/Dense>. I know I could do #include <eigen3/Eigen/Dense> but then my code will break on windows or when/if I upgrade to eigen4. – quant Apr 26 '14 at 1:21
  • @ArmanSchwarz I hope my additions to the answer are satisfactory. – laune Apr 26 '14 at 9:48
29

I had this same problem on my Ubuntu 14 box. Ended up creating symlinks to get around it. With eigen3 installed in /usr/local/include do the following:

cd /usr/local/include
sudo ln -sf eigen3/Eigen Eigen
sudo ln -sf eigen3/unsupported unsupported

You should now be able to include the headers by:

#include <Eigen/Dense>
#include <unsupported/Eigen/FFT>
  • This happens with a surprising number of libraries on Ubuntu and related distros. They put things into a separate folder to avoid possible conflicts. Your solution is the most elegant I've been able to find to-date. – Mad Physicist Aug 27 '14 at 22:36
  • Thanks Mad Physicist! The above symlink fix seems to be needed even if you install the library by doing "sudo apt-get install libeigen3-dev". The only difference is that eigen3 is in /usr/include instead of /usr/local/include – kbrown Aug 30 '14 at 20:37
  • Symlinking is definitely the preferred solution, instead of using clumsy -I specifiers in the compiler. BTW, this procedure is also suggested in the installation webpage of Eigen. – RHertel Jan 15 '16 at 18:12
  • This really aught to be the selected answer. – Sailanarmo May 16 '18 at 19:37
  • Sometimes eigen3 is located under /usr/include/. – Rafael Dec 15 '18 at 11:18
17

Change

#include <Eigen/Dense>

to

#include <eigen3/Eigen/Dense>
  • Looking through the directories, this one makes most sense to me. But symlinks work too I guess. – bjd2385 Aug 13 '16 at 5:14
  • I second that! Thanks @raksi – thclark Dec 30 '16 at 10:53
4

Should use the following:

#if defined __GNUC__ || defined __APPLE__
#include <Eigen/Dense>
#else
#include <eigen3/Eigen/Dense>
#endif
4

This worked for me (using Macports for installing Shogun on Mac OS 10.11):

cd ${macports_prefix}/include
sudo ln -sf eigen3/Eigen Eigen
sudo ln -sf eigen3/unsupported unsupported
-1

If you follow the getting started instructions at the main Eigen site then you can't go far wrong.

To surmise, download then extract the Eigen source code into a directory of choice. Next copy the "Eigen" directory into /usr/local/include/. NOTE this is the directory named "Eigen" WITHIN the directory structure extracted, NOT the entire directory structure itself. It worked for me on an Ubuntu 14.04 virtual machine.

  • 1
    you comment caused me wasting like 1 hour at least. It is the other way around. You must extract the entire eigen-eigen folder in /usr/local/include, under the name of "eigen3". So this must include "Eigen" folder among many others – Radu Simionescu Oct 7 '16 at 21:50

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