I am trying to make a stable implementation of quicksort using linked lists, and for some reason this code is crashing. It seems to get to the second iteration of the while loop in partition before it crashes.

Basically, I'm using the head as a pivot point and anything less goes in a new linked list and anything greater than the pivot goes in a new linked list as well. This is called recursively and then at the end they are combined.

    class Node
    {
    public:
        Node* next;
        int key;
        int key2;

        Node()
        {
            next = NULL;
        }
    };

    void fillRandom(Node*& root, int length)
    {
       if(length != 0){
            root->key = rand()%10;
            root->next = new Node;
            fillRandom(root->next, length-1);
        }
    }

    void partitionLL(Node*& lessThan, Node*& greaterThan, Node*& root)
    {
        Node* lessThanTemp = lessThan; Node* greaterThanTemp = greaterThan;
        Node* temp = root;

        while(temp->next != NULL)
        {
            if(temp->key > root->key){
                greaterThanTemp = temp;
                greaterThanTemp->next = new Node;
                greaterThanTemp = greaterThanTemp->next;
            }else{
                lessThanTemp = temp;
                lessThanTemp->next = new Node;
                lessThanTemp = lessThanTemp->next;
            }
            temp = temp->next;
        }
    }

    void quickSort(Node* root)
    {
        if(root->next != NULL){//i.e. theres only two nodes in the list
            Node* lessThan = new Node; Node* greaterThan = new Node;
            partitionLL(lessThan, greaterThan, root);
            quickSort(lessThan);
            quickSort(greaterThan);
        }else{
            return;
        }
    }

    int main()
    {
        int length = 15;
        Node* root = new Node;

        fillRandom(root, length);
        quickSort(root);
    }
  • 3
    This is the perfect time to learn how to use a debugger. If you build a debug-version of your program, and run it in a debugger, then the debugger will stop at the place of the crash. Then the debugger will let you examine and walk up the function call stack (if it stops in library code for example) and also let you examine values of variables. – Some programmer dude Apr 25 '14 at 5:50
  • A debugger can also be used to step through code line by line, which might be better in this case, as it will allow you to see exactly what the code is doing and what values it assigns to variables. Especially do it with your partionLL function, as it (to me) seems suspect. – Some programmer dude Apr 25 '14 at 5:53
  • And a last note: You're not actually sorting anything, as the root->next pointer will be NULL in your first call to quickSort from the main function. – Some programmer dude Apr 25 '14 at 5:55
  • The last thing leads me to believe the program you show us is not the one actually crashing, as this program does not do anything that can crash: It calls quickSort which immediately returns, and the program exits. Is it really a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example of the crashing program? – Some programmer dude Apr 25 '14 at 6:00
  • Just to make things look nicer I took out the part where I assigned values to the linked list. I will make an edit putting that back in. I believe the error has something to do with the temp->next being null the after it runs through the first time. – amarucci13 Apr 25 '14 at 6:07
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You idea is founded (building two linked lists). Its the detachment and reattachment code that is lacking. When dealing with linked lists the first thing to remember is it is rare that you ever need to allocate new nodes when doing rearrangement. You use the nodes you're given. That is what they're there for. All your algorithm should be doing is simply rearranging the pointers within.

The following does precisely that. Once the list is allocated no new nodes are needed. The algorithm apart from that is the same idea as yours:

  • Use the head node as the pivot value. Detach it from the list
  • Enumerate the remainder of the list tacking nodes into one of two lists along the way. Note the code for doing the movement from one list to another adds the nodes to the ends of their respective lists.
  • When finished, you have two lists and a lonesome pivot node all on its own. Terminate both lists and recurse.
  • Once the recursion returns seek to the end of the left-side list. That is the place where the pivot node is tacked, then the right-side list is joined to that.

The code is below. I strongly suggest walking through it in a debugger:

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>
#include <random>

struct Node
{
    Node* next;
    int key;
    int key2;

    Node( int key, int key2 )
        : key(key), key2(key2), next()
    {}
};

Node * createList(size_t N)
{
    std::random_device rd;
    std::mt19937 rng(rd());
    std::uniform_int_distribution<> dist(1,10);

    Node *root = nullptr;
    Node **pp = &root;
    for (int i=0; i<N; ++i)
    {
        *pp = new Node(dist(rng), i+1);
        pp = &(*pp)->next;
    }
    return root;
}

void freeList(Node *& root)
{
    while (root)
    {
        Node *tmp = root;
        root = tmp->next;
        delete tmp;
    }
}

void printList(const Node* root)
{
    for (;root;root = root->next)
        std::cout << root->key << '(' << root->key2 << ") ";
    std::cout << '\n';
}

// quicksort a linked list.
void quickSort(Node *&root)
{
    // trivial lists are just returned immediately
    if  (!root || !(root->next))
        return;

    Node *lhs = nullptr, **pplhs = &lhs;
    Node *rhs = nullptr, **pprhs = &rhs;
    Node *pvt = root;
    root = root->next;
    pvt->next = nullptr;

    while (root)
    {
        if (root->key < pvt->key)
        {
            *pplhs = root; // tack on lhs list end
            pplhs = &(*pplhs)->next;
        }
        else
        {
            *pprhs = root; // tack on rhs list end
            pprhs = &(*pprhs)->next;
        }
        root = root->next;
    }

    // terminate both list. note that the pivot is still
    //  unlinked, and will remain so until we merge
    *pplhs = *pprhs = nullptr;

    // invoke on sublists.
    quickSort(lhs);
    quickSort(rhs);

    // find end of lhs list, slip the pivot into  position, then 
    //  tack on the rhs list.
    while (*pplhs)
        pplhs = &(*pplhs)->next;
    *pplhs = pvt;
    pvt->next = rhs;

    // set final output
    root = lhs;
}

int main()
{
    Node *root = createList(20);
    printList(root);
    quickSort(root);
    printList(root);
    freeList(root);
    return 0;
}

Output (varies)

6(1) 7(2) 1(3) 10(4) 8(5) 10(6) 4(7) 7(8) 2(9) 9(10) 1(11) 8(12) 10(13) 8(14) 6(15) 9(16) 8(17) 2(18) 8(19) 9(20) 
1(3) 1(11) 2(9) 2(18) 4(7) 6(1) 6(15) 7(2) 7(8) 8(5) 8(12) 8(14) 8(17) 8(19) 9(10) 9(16) 9(20) 10(4) 10(6) 10(13) 

The number in parens is the original order of the nodes in the original list. Note that I specifically chose a small random pool to choose from so as to experience lots of equal-keys, thereby demonstrating the sort is stable; like-keys preserve their original list ordering. For example, there were five 8 values in the original list. After sorting their sequence is:

8(5) 8(12) 8(14) 8(17) 8(19)

This is intentional, and accomplished by ensuring when we moved items to the split-lists we always tacked them on the ends.

Anyway, I hope it helps.

  • Oh I see. This helped quite a bit. I realize now that I forgot to merge them. However I was asking specifically about why mine was crashing, but it turns out I don't even need code for that question just the logic. I am a little confused as to a few things you're doing here though. Why is ppplhs a double pointer? Also, why does pplhs = &lhs. Finally, does while(root) return true if the Node is not NULL? Anyway, this did helped. I learned a few things too. Thank you! – amarucci13 Apr 25 '14 at 19:00
  • I use a pointer-to-pointer to hold the address of the pointer that will receive the next node pointer. It makes things like forward-list-building much easier. pointers to pointers are like regular single-direction pointers, but what they hold is an additional indirection level away (they hold an address of a pointer). Thus pplhs = &lhs says "put the address of the lhs pointer into pplhs. Regarding while(root) boolean eval in C is zero-or-not-zero. a null pointer is synonymous to zero, so while(root) means "while root holds a non-null value". – WhozCraig Apr 25 '14 at 19:06
  • @amarucci13 and if you found the answer helpful you can up-tick it with the arrows at the top-left of the answer posting. if you found it at the correct answer, you can check the checkbox as well. Right now I'd uptick and see if more answers come along that may be a better fit before selecting this as the best answer. – WhozCraig Apr 25 '14 at 19:08
  • Yeah I tried that but don't have enough reputation oh here, you need 15 to upvote. – amarucci13 Apr 25 '14 at 20:06
  • @amarucci13 ah bummer. well, hopefully it helps. spend some time learning to debug, then step through the code in a debugger (gdb integration in CodeBlocks or Netbeans, or for Windows, VS etc.) Odd as it sounds, debugging working code is extremely helpful in understanding how it works. Regardless, glad it helped. – WhozCraig Apr 25 '14 at 20:11

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