8

I have:

class Foo;

class Bar {
  Foo foo;
  Bar(): foo(foo) {};
}

Bar bar;

At this point, is

bar.foo // <--- how is this initialized?

[This question arose from a buggy ref-counted pointer implemntation; I could have sworn that I ensured each pointer was pointing at something non-null; but I ended up with a pointer that pointed at something NULL.]

  • You're saying this compiled and ran? Was foo full of garbage bits? – thebretness Feb 24 '10 at 19:47
  • You don't have any pointers in the code you posted, so I'm not sure what that has to do with the question? – Joe Feb 24 '10 at 19:48
  • @thebretness : it compiled ran, waited a while, then threw a segfault at me – anon Feb 24 '10 at 19:50
  • @joe: the problem originally arose from a ref-counted pointer implementation; I've simplified the core problem down to the above – anon Feb 24 '10 at 19:51
  • 1
    I'm not sure why you'd roll back the title, this one is more informative. – GManNickG Feb 24 '10 at 20:27
12

foo is fully initialized once you've entered the body of the constructor (that's the guaranteed general case; specifically once it has finished initializing in the initialize list.)

In your case, you are copy-constructing from a non-constructed object. This results in undefined behavior, per §12.7/1 (thank you, gf):

For an object of non-POD class type (clause 9), before the constructor begins execution and after the destructor finishes execution, referring to any nonstatic member or base class of the object results in undefined behavior.

In fact, it gives this example:

struct W { int j; };
struct X : public virtual W { };
struct Y {
    int *p;
    X x;
    Y() : p(&x.j) // undefined, x is not yet constructed
    { }
};

Note, the compiler is not required to give a diagnosis of undefined behavior, per §1.4/1. While I think we all agree it would be nice, it simply isn't something the compiler implementers need to worry about.


Charles points out a loophole of sorts. If Bar has static storage and if Foo is a POD type, then it will be initialized when this code runs. Static-stored variables are zero-initialized before an other initialization runs.

This means whatever Foo is, as long as it doesn't need a constructor to be run to be initialized (i.e., be POD) it's members will be zero-initialized. Essentially, you'll be copying a zero-initialized object.

In general though, such code is to be avoided. :)

| improve this answer | |
  • Yes, but there's a reference to foo before the body of the constructor. – Chris Jester-Young Feb 24 '10 at 19:48
  • @Chris: I just saw that, I've added. I will look for the standard answer. – GManNickG Feb 24 '10 at 19:49
  • @Gman: I think you're right. However, if i'm copy-constructing from a non-constructed object, why does the compiler let me do this? This is clearly my fault, but I spent 4-5 hours of my life tracking this down. :-) – anon Feb 24 '10 at 19:52
  • I'm pretty sure objects are constructed after the initilisation list of the constructor completes, but before the constructor is called. This allows bypassing the default constructor for custom initialisation. – Cameron Feb 24 '10 at 19:55
  • 2
    @anon: Because its undefined behaviour, i think §12.7/1 should cover that - referring to a non-static member before the constructor executes results in undefined behaviour. – Georg Fritzsche Feb 24 '10 at 19:57
5
Bar(): foo(foo) {};

This will call the copy constructor of foo, thus copy-constructing from a non-initialized object. That will result in undefined behavior, except if you have implemented a copy constructor that handles that specific case, for example:

class Foo
{
    public:
        Foo()
        {
            std::cout << "Foo()";
        }

        Foo(const Foo& from)
        {
            if(this == &from) std::cout << "special case";
            else std::cout << "other case"; 
        }
};

But that special case is normally used for other purposes, like cheap copies of strings (when using a string class). So don't try and exploit that special case ;)

| improve this answer | |
  • Interesting. I'm curious if this is covered by the quote GMan makes about referring to any nonstatic member resulting in undefined behaviour i.e. is taking the address of the member actually guaranteed to work? – Troubadour Feb 24 '10 at 20:55
  • @Troubadour: The memory for the class (and its members) is already allocated, so member addresses are correct when calling the constructor. – AndiDog Feb 24 '10 at 21:07
3

A slightly expanded version of your code seems to indicate that no, foo is never initialized; you would seem to have undefined behavior. In this example, "Foo()" is never printed, indicating no instance of Foo is ever constructed:

#include <iostream>

class Foo {
public:
    Foo() { std::cerr << "Foo()"; }
};

class Bar {
public:
    Foo foo;
    Bar(): foo(foo) {};
};

int main() {
    Bar bar;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • It's not so different from the classic int main() {Foo foo = foo;}. That, too, compiles. With int instead of Foo, both VC and Comeau give me a warning. With Foo, both fail to give one. – sbi Feb 24 '10 at 20:22
0

Isn't Foo using a default intrinsic constructor, with the initialisation list invoking that default constructor automatically to initialise the object?

| improve this answer | |

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