27

How to get the dates between two dates?

I have a variable @MAXDATE which is storing the maximum date from the table. Now I want to get the all dates between @Maxdate and GETDATE() and want to store these date in a cursor.

So far I have done as follows:

;with GetDates As  
(  
select DATEADD(day,1,@maxDate) as TheDate
UNION ALL  
select DATEADD(day,1, TheDate) from GetDates  
where TheDate < GETDATE()  
)  

This is working perfectly but when I am trying to store these values in a cursor

SET @DateCurSor=CURSOR FOR
                SELECT TheDate
                FROM GetDates

Compilation Error

Incorrect syntax near the keyword 'SET'.

How to solve this.

Thanks in advance

  • 3
    WHY on earth do you want a cursor ?!? You should try to avoid cursors as much as you can! – marc_s Apr 25 '14 at 10:31
  • 1
    The situation is this that I have to use CURSOR. – user3193557 Apr 25 '14 at 10:33
  • 4
    W H Y ? ? ? I'm 99% sure you don't have to use a cursor! And it would be better if you didn't use a cursor! – marc_s Apr 25 '14 at 10:34
  • I have a table which is containing date,item code and quantity. Suppose the data of the table is as follows: date ||it_cd||qty 24-04-14||i-1 ||10 26-04-14||i-1 ||20 Now how will I get the qty on 28-04-2014 – user3193557 Apr 25 '14 at 10:38
  • 3
    If you want to show a table, please edit your question and add it. There's no formatting in the comments. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 25 '14 at 10:40

10 Answers 10

44

My first suggestion would be use your calendar table, if you don't have one, then create one. They are very useful. Your query is then as simple as:

DECLARE @MinDate DATE = '20140101',
        @MaxDate DATE = '20140106';

SELECT  Date
FROM    dbo.Calendar
WHERE   Date >= @MinDate
AND     Date < @MaxDate;

If you don't want to, or can't create a calendar table you can still do this on the fly without a recursive CTE:

DECLARE @MinDate DATE = '20140101',
        @MaxDate DATE = '20140106';

SELECT  TOP (DATEDIFF(DAY, @MinDate, @MaxDate) + 1)
        Date = DATEADD(DAY, ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY a.object_id) - 1, @MinDate)
FROM    sys.all_objects a
        CROSS JOIN sys.all_objects b;

For further reading on this see:

With regard to then using this sequence of dates in a cursor, I would really recommend you find another way. There is usually a set based alternative that will perform much better.

So with your data:

  date   | it_cd | qty 
24-04-14 |  i-1  | 10 
26-04-14 |  i-1  | 20

To get the quantity on 28-04-2014 (which I gather is your requirement), you don't actually need any of the above, you can simply use:

SELECT  TOP 1 date, it_cd, qty 
FROM    T
WHERE   it_cd = 'i-1'
AND     Date <= '20140428'
ORDER BY Date DESC;

If you don't want it for a particular item:

SELECT  date, it_cd, qty 
FROM    (   SELECT  date, 
                    it_cd, 
                    qty, 
                    RowNumber = ROW_NUMBER() OVER(PARTITION BY ic_id 
                                                    ORDER BY date DESC)
            FROM    T
            WHERE   Date  <= '20140428'
        ) T
WHERE   RowNumber = 1;
  • I'm not sure the cross join is necessary. Seems to be irrelevant when executing the query. – pimbrouwers Aug 29 '16 at 23:16
  • 1
    @PimBrouwers The necessity of the cross join is in how many rows are required. If less dates are required than the number of objects in sys.all_objects, then it isn't required, but if the date range were to span 20 years, then the cross join would be needed. Using TOP (Days needed) means that there is little or no overhead from the cross join when less rows are needed, so there is no harm it leaving it in. – GarethD Aug 30 '16 at 8:00
  • Awesome! Thanks for explaining that. Much appreciated. Fantastic query overall. – pimbrouwers Aug 30 '16 at 12:39
  • Here is another good article: mssqltips.com/sqlservertip/4054/… – Jose Sep 18 '18 at 23:45
17

You can use this script to find dates between two dates. Reference taken from this Article:

DECLARE @StartDateTime DATETIME
DECLARE @EndDateTime DATETIME

SET @StartDateTime = '2015-01-01'
SET @EndDateTime = '2015-01-12';

WITH DateRange(DateData) AS 
(
    SELECT @StartDateTime as Date
    UNION ALL
    SELECT DATEADD(d,1,DateData)
    FROM DateRange 
    WHERE DateData < @EndDateTime
)
SELECT DateData
FROM DateRange
OPTION (MAXRECURSION 0)
GO
1

Easily create a Table Value Function that will return a table with all dates. Input dates as string You can customize the date in the the format you like '01/01/2017' or '01-01-2017' in string formats (103,126 ...)

Try this

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[DateRange_To_Table] ( @minDate_Str NVARCHAR(30), @maxDate_Str NVARCHAR(30))

RETURNS  @Result TABLE(DateString NVARCHAR(30) NOT NULL, DateNameString NVARCHAR(30) NOT NULL)

AS

begin

    DECLARE @minDate DATETIME, @maxDate DATETIME
    SET @minDate = CONVERT(Datetime, @minDate_Str,103)
    SET @maxDate = CONVERT(Datetime, @maxDate_Str,103)


    INSERT INTO @Result(DateString, DateNameString )
    SELECT CONVERT(NVARCHAR(10),@minDate,103), CONVERT(NVARCHAR(30),DATENAME(dw,@minDate))



    WHILE @maxDate > @minDate
    BEGIN
        SET @minDate = (SELECT DATEADD(dd,1,@minDate))
        INSERT INTO @Result(DateString, DateNameString )
        SELECT CONVERT(NVARCHAR(10),@minDate,103), CONVERT(NVARCHAR(30),DATENAME(dw,@minDate))
    END




    return

end   

To execute the function do this:

SELECT * FROM dbo.DateRange_To_Table ('01/01/2017','31/01/2017')

The output will be

01/01/2017  Sunday
02/01/2017  Monday
03/01/2017  Tuesday
04/01/2017  Wednesday
05/01/2017  Thursday
06/01/2017  Friday
07/01/2017  Saturday
08/01/2017  Sunday
09/01/2017  Monday
10/01/2017  Tuesday
11/01/2017  Wednesday
12/01/2017  Thursday
13/01/2017  Friday
14/01/2017  Saturday
15/01/2017  Sunday
16/01/2017  Monday
17/01/2017  Tuesday
18/01/2017  Wednesday
19/01/2017  Thursday
20/01/2017  Friday
21/01/2017  Saturday
22/01/2017  Sunday
23/01/2017  Monday
24/01/2017  Tuesday
25/01/2017  Wednesday
26/01/2017  Thursday
27/01/2017  Friday
28/01/2017  Saturday
29/01/2017  Sunday
30/01/2017  Monday
31/01/2017  Tuesday
1

You can try this:

    SET LANGUAGE SPANISH

DECLARE @startDate DATE = GETDATE() -- Your start date
DECLARE @endDate DATE = DATEADD(MONTH, 16, GETDATE()) -- Your end date
DECLARE @years INT = YEAR(@endDate) - YEAR(@startDate)

CREATE TABLE #TMP_YEARS (
    [year] INT
)

-- Get all posible years between the start and end date
WHILE @years >= 0
BEGIN
    INSERT INTO #TMP_YEARS
    ([year])
    SELECT YEAR(@startDate) + @years

    SET @years = @years - 1
END

;WITH [days]([day]) AS -- Posible days at a month
(
    SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 2 UNION ALL SELECT 3 UNION ALL SELECT 4 UNION ALL SELECT 5 UNION ALL SELECT 6 UNION ALL SELECT 7 UNION ALL SELECT 8 UNION ALL SELECT 9 UNION ALL -- days lower than 10
    SELECT 10 UNION ALL SELECT 11 UNION ALL SELECT 12 UNION ALL SELECT 13 UNION ALL SELECT 14 UNION ALL SELECT 15 UNION ALL SELECT 16 UNION ALL SELECT 17 UNION ALL SELECT 18 UNION ALL SELECT 19 UNION ALL -- days lower than 20
    SELECT 20 UNION ALL SELECT 21 UNION ALL SELECT 22 UNION ALL SELECT 23 UNION ALL SELECT 24 UNION ALL SELECT 25 UNION ALL SELECT 26 UNION ALL SELECT 27 UNION ALL SELECT 28 UNION ALL SELECT 29 UNION ALL -- days lower than 30
    SELECT 30 UNION ALL SELECT 31 -- days higher 30
),
[months]([month]) AS -- All months at a year
(
    SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 2 UNION ALL SELECT 3 UNION ALL SELECT 4 UNION ALL SELECT 5 UNION ALL SELECT 6 UNION ALL SELECT 7 UNION ALL SELECT 8 UNION ALL SELECT 9 UNION ALL SELECT 10 UNION ALL SELECT 11 UNION ALL SELECT 12
)
SELECT CONVERT(VARCHAR, a.[year]) + '-' + REPLICATE('0', 2 - LEN(CONVERT(VARCHAR, n.[month]))) + CONVERT(VARCHAR, n.[month]) + '-' + REPLICATE('0', 2 - LEN(CONVERT(VARCHAR, d.[day]))) + CONVERT(VARCHAR, d.[day]) as [date]
  FROM #TMP_YEARS a
 CROSS JOIN [months] n -- Join all years with all months
 INNER JOIN [days] d on DAY(EOMONTH(CONVERT(VARCHAR, a.[year]) + '-' + REPLICATE('0', 2 - LEN(CONVERT(VARCHAR, n.[month]))) + CONVERT(VARCHAR, n.[month]) + '-' + CONVERT(VARCHAR, DAY(EOMONTH(CAST(CONVERT(VARCHAR, a.[year]) + '-' + CONVERT(varchar, n.[month]) + '-15' AS DATE)))))) >= d.[day] AND -- The number of the day can't be higher than the last day of the current month and the current year
                      CONVERT(VARCHAR, a.[year]) + '-' + REPLICATE('0', 2 - LEN(CONVERT(VARCHAR, n.[month]))) + CONVERT(VARCHAR, n.[month]) + '-' + REPLICATE('0', 2 - LEN(CONVERT(VARCHAR, d.[day]))) + CONVERT(VARCHAR, d.[day]) <= ISNULL(@endDate, GETDATE()) AND -- The current date can't be higher than the end date
                      CONVERT(VARCHAR, a.[year]) + '-' + REPLICATE('0', 2 - LEN(CONVERT(VARCHAR, n.[month]))) + CONVERT(VARCHAR, n.[month]) + '-' + REPLICATE('0', 2 - LEN(CONVERT(VARCHAR, d.[day]))) + CONVERT(VARCHAR, d.[day]) >= ISNULL(@startDate, GETDATE()) -- The current date should be higher than the start date
 ORDER BY a.[year] ASC, n.[month] ASC, d.[day] ASC

The output will be something like this, you can format the date as you like:

2019-01-24
2019-01-25
2019-01-26
2019-01-27
2019-01-28
2019-01-29
2019-01-30
2019-01-31
2019-02-01
2019-02-02
2019-02-03
2019-02-04
2019-02-05
2019-02-06
2019-02-07
2019-02-08
2019-02-09
...
0
create procedure [dbo].[p_display_dates](@startdate datetime,@enddate datetime)
as
begin
    declare @mxdate datetime
    declare @indate datetime
    create table #daterange (dater datetime)
    insert into #daterange values (@startdate)
    set @mxdate = (select MAX(dater) from #daterange)
    while @mxdate < @enddate
        begin
            set @indate = dateadd(day,1,@mxdate)
            insert into #daterange values (@indate)
            set @mxdate = (select MAX(dater) from #daterange)
        end
    select * from #daterange
end
0

Just saying...here is a more simple approach to this:

declare @sdate date = '2017-06-25'
    , @edate date = '2017-07-24'

; with dates_CTE (date) as (
        select @sdate 
    Union ALL
        select DATEADD(day, 1, date)
        from dates_CTE
        where date < @edate
) select 
    *
from dates_CTE 
0

I listed dates of 2 Weeks later. You can use variable @period OR function datediff(dd, @date_start, @date_end)

declare @period INT, @date_start datetime, @date_end datetime, @i int;

set @period = 14
set @date_start = convert(date,DATEADD(D, -@period, curent_timestamp))
set @date_end = convert(date,current_timestamp)
set @i = 1

create table #datesList(dts datetime)
insert into #datesList values (@date_start)
while @i <= @period
    Begin
        insert into #datesList values (dateadd(d,@i,@date_start))
        set @i = @i + 1
    end
select cast(dts as DATE) from #datesList
Drop Table #datesList
0

This is the method that I would use.

DECLARE 
    @DateFrom DATETIME = GETDATE(),
    @DateTo DATETIME = DATEADD(HOUR, -1, GETDATE() + 2); -- Add 2 days and minus one hour


-- Dates spaced a day apart 

WITH MyDates (MyDate)
AS (
    SELECT @DateFrom
    UNION ALL
    SELECT DATEADD(DAY, 1, MyDate)
    FROM MyDates
    WHERE MyDate < @DateTo
   )

SELECT 
    MyDates.MyDate
    , CONVERT(DATE, MyDates.MyDate) AS [MyDate in DATE format]
FROM 
    MyDates;

Here is a similar example, but this time the dates are spaced one hour apart to further aid understanding of how the query works:

-- Alternative example with dates spaced an hour apart

WITH MyDates (MyDate)
AS (SELECT @DateFrom
    UNION ALL
    SELECT DATEADD(HOUR, 1, MyDate)
    FROM MyDates
    WHERE MyDate < @DateTo
   )

SELECT 
    MyDates.MyDate
FROM 
    MyDates;

As you can see, the query is fast, accurate and versatile.

0

This can be considered as bit tricky way as in my situation, I can't use a CTE table, so decided to join with "sys.all_objects" and then created row numbers and added that to start date till it reached the end date.

See the code below where I generated all dates in Jul 2018. Replace hard coded dates with your own variables(tested in SQL Server 2016):

select top (datediff(dd, '2018-06-30', '2018-07-31')) ROW_NUMBER() 
over(order by a.name) as SiNo, 
Dateadd(dd, ROW_NUMBER() over(order by a.name) , '2018-06-30') as Dt from sys.all_objects a
-1
DECLARE @FirstDate DATE = '2018-01-01'
DECLARE @LastDate Date = '2018-12-31'
DECLARE @tbl TABLE(ID INT IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY,CurrDate date)
INSERT @tbl VALUES( @FirstDate)
WHILE @FirstDate < @LastDate
BEGIN
SET @FirstDate = DATEADD( day,1, @FirstDate)
INSERT @tbl VALUES( @FirstDate)
END
INSERT @tbl VALUES( @LastDate) 

SELECT * FROM @tbl

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