69

I am new to nodejs and browserify. I started with this link .

I have file main.js which contains this code

var unique = require('uniq');

var data = [1, 2, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5, 5, 6];

this.LogData =function(){
console.log(unique(data));
};

Now I Install the uniq module with npm:

 npm install uniq

Then I bundle up all the required modules starting at main.js into a single file called bundle.js with the browserify command:

browserify main.js -o bundle.js

The generated file looks like this:

(function e(t,n,r){function s(o,u){if(!n[o]){if(!t[o]){var a=typeof require=="function"&&require;if(!u&&a)return a(o,!0);if(i)return i(o,!0);throw new Error("Cannot find module '"+o+"'")}var f=n[o]={exports:{}};t[o][0].call(f.exports,function(e){var n=t[o][1][e];return s(n?n:e)},f,f.exports,e,t,n,r)}return n[o].exports}var i=typeof require=="function"&&require;for(var o=0;o<r.length;o++)s(r[o]);return s})({1:[function(require,module,exports){
var unique = require('uniq');

var data = [1, 2, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5, 5, 6];

this.LogData =function(){
console.log(unique(data));
};

},{"uniq":2}],2:[function(require,module,exports){
"use strict"

function unique_pred(list, compare) {
  var ptr = 1
    , len = list.length
    , a=list[0], b=list[0]
  for(var i=1; i<len; ++i) {
    b = a
    a = list[i]
    if(compare(a, b)) {
      if(i === ptr) {
        ptr++
        continue
      }
      list[ptr++] = a
    }
  }
  list.length = ptr
  return list
}

function unique_eq(list) {
  var ptr = 1
    , len = list.length
    , a=list[0], b = list[0]
  for(var i=1; i<len; ++i, b=a) {
    b = a
    a = list[i]
    if(a !== b) {
      if(i === ptr) {
        ptr++
        continue
      }
      list[ptr++] = a
    }
  }
  list.length = ptr
  return list
}

function unique(list, compare, sorted) {
  if(list.length === 0) {
    return []
  }
  if(compare) {
    if(!sorted) {
      list.sort(compare)
    }
    return unique_pred(list, compare)
  }
  if(!sorted) {
    list.sort()
  }
  return unique_eq(list)
}

module.exports = unique
},{}]},{},[1])

After including bundle.js file into my index.htm page, how do I call logData function ??

  • Where do you want to call it? And why do you want to call it? – artur grzesiak Apr 25 '14 at 14:39
  • 2
    @arturgrzesiak: I want to utilize this function in one of my other project which i will be running in browser. – SharpCoder Apr 26 '14 at 6:03
65

By default, browserify doesn't let you access the modules from outside of the browserified code – if you want to call code in a browserified module, you're supposed to browserify your code together with the module. See http://browserify.org/ for examples of that.

Of course, you could also explicitly make your method accessible from outside like this:

window.LogData =function(){
  console.log(unique(data));
};

Then you could call LogData() from anywhere else on the page.

  • Thank you. This works. Does this mean, while creating functions instead of saying this.functionName, I should write window.functionName? Do we have any other work around for this? Any reasons for using window.functionName? – SharpCoder Apr 27 '14 at 6:06
  • @Brown_Dynamite In a browser, everything you attach to the window object can be accessed from anywhere on the webpage. – thejh Apr 27 '14 at 11:18
  • Thank you. This makes sense. Is there any work around? otherwise before I browserify my code, I have to add window. in front of all the function i need to expose. – SharpCoder Apr 27 '14 at 11:32
  • 12
    "you're supposed to browserify your code together with the module" - Ugh, what if I want to do something like onclick="someFunction()". You can't possibly be arguing that that's a rare use-case!?! – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Aug 12 '15 at 22:31
  • 32
    There's a serious lack of documentation anywhere for beginners on how to actually use Browserify on the client. – Oliver Dixon Dec 19 '15 at 13:18
83

The key part of bundling standalone modules with Browserify is the --s option. It exposes whatever you export from your module using node's module.exports as a global variable. The file can then be included in a <script> tag.

You only need to do this if for some reason you need that global variable to be exposed. In my case the client needed a standalone module that could be included in web pages without them needing to worry about this Browserify business.

Here's an example where we use the --s option with an argument of module:

browserify index.js --s module > dist/module.js

This will expose our module as a global variable named module.
Source.

Update: Thanks to @fotinakis. Make sure you're passing --standalone your-module-name. If you forget that --standalone takes an argument, Browserify might silently generate an empty module since it couldn't find it.

Hope this saves you some time.

  • 1
    I am trying to browserify babelified ES6 code. But the standalone object is empty when I try to console it in browser. Simple ES6 code without any modules works fine in standalone mode. Any pointers on this? – John Mar 18 '16 at 12:16
  • @jackyrudetsky no idea, I would recommend add a question on SO, sounds like an interesting issue. could be related to this. github.com/substack/node-browserify/issues/1357 – Matas Vaitkevicius Mar 18 '16 at 12:22
  • @jackyrudetsky Make sure you're passing --standalone your-module-name. If you forget that --standalone takes an argument, browserify might silently generate an empty module since it couldn't find it. – fotinakis May 20 '16 at 18:53
  • 1
    @fotinakis It was actually an issue in Browserify github.com/substack/node-browserify/issues/1537 – John May 23 '16 at 9:13
  • 2
    IMO this should be the accepted answer. If you are using a global function, it is much better to have your own namespace than to hang every function off of window. – VictorB Oct 4 '16 at 0:35
20

@Matas Vaitkevicius's answer with Browserify's standalone option is correct (@thejh's answer using the window global variable also works, but as others have noted, it pollutes the global namespace so it's not ideal). I wanted to add a little more detail on how to use the standalone option.

In the source script that you want to bundle, make sure to expose the functions you want to call via module.exports. In the client script, you can call these exposed functions via <bundle-name>.<func-name>. Here's an example:

My source file src/script.js will have this:
module.exports = {myFunc: func};

My browserify command will look something like this:
browserify src/script.js --standalone myBundle > dist/bundle.js

And my client script dist/client.js will load the bundled script
<script src="bundle.js"></script>
and then call the exposed function like this:
<script>myBundle.myFunc();</script>


There's no need to require the bundle name in the client script before calling the exposed functions, e.g. <script src="bundle.js"></script><script>var bundled = require("myBundle"); bundled.myFunc();</script> isn't necessary and won't work.

In fact, just like all functions bundled by browserify without standalone mode, the require function won't be available outside of the bundled script. Browserify allows you to use some Node functions client-side, but only in the bundled script itself; it's not meant to create a standalone module you can import and use anywhere client-side, which is why we have to go to all this extra trouble just to call a single function outside of its bundled context.

  • Wow! Finally a practical example. – N73k Sep 18 '18 at 17:13
6

Read README.md of browserify about --standalone parameter or google "browserify umd"

  • 14
    This is more a hint on where to find an answer than an answer. – user2314737 Jul 1 '14 at 16:57
  • this lead me to the solution I was looking for for two days (how to use browserify output from a require.js environment). thank you! – Flion Aug 25 '14 at 22:16
5

I just read through the answers and seems like nobody mentioned the use of the global variable scope? Which is usefull if you want to use the same code in node.js and in the browser.

class Test
{
  constructor()
  {
  }
}
global.TestClass = Test;

Then you can access the TestClass anywhere.

<script src="bundle.js"></script>
<script>
var test = new TestClass(); // Enjoy!
</script>

Note: The TestClass then becomes available everywhere. Which is the same as using the window variable.

Additionally you can create a decorator that exposes a class to the global scope. Which is really nice but makes it hard to track where a variable is defined.

  • As you yourself say, adding the function to global produces the same effect as adding to window, which was already covered by thejh. This answer adds no new information. – Galen Long May 5 '18 at 19:28
  • @GalenLong maybe you forgot that there is no window variable in node.js? And some libraries that target node and browser may want to use global instead. My answer got a few upvotes and is not in minus yet so i think its informative for others if not for you. – Azarus May 6 '18 at 14:16
  • You're right, @Azarus. There were two other duplicate answers on the page and I incorrectly included yours in with the bunch. My apologies. – Galen Long May 7 '18 at 16:51
  • just want to note that the hanging parens here is a very bad practice for javascript, for example: apply this pattern to the return keyword and prepare to cry. e.g return {} but drop the opening curly brace down to the next line. – Sgnl Sep 29 '18 at 0:05
  • 1
    @Azarus I created a fiddle to demonstrate what I mean - jsfiddle.net/cubaksot/1 – Sgnl Jan 14 at 17:01
1

You have a few options:

  1. Let plugin browserify-bridge auto-export the modules to a generated entry module. This is helpful for SDK projects or situations where you don't have to manually keep up with what is exported.

  2. Follow a pseudo-namespace pattern for roll-up exposure:

First, arrange your library like this, taking advantage of index look-ups on folders:

/src
--entry.js
--/helpers
--- index.js
--- someHelper.js
--/providers
--- index.js
--- someProvider.js
...

With this pattern, you define entry like this:

exports.Helpers = require('./helpers');
exports.Providers = require('./providers');
...

Notice the require automatically loads the index.js from each respective sub-folder

In your subfolders, you can just include a similar manifest of the available modules in that context:

exports.SomeHelper = require('./someHelper');

This pattern scales really well and allows for contextual (folder by folder) tracking of what to include in the rolled-up api.

0

it takes me a while figure out and understand this issue even with these answers

it's really simple - it's about wrapping

for this purpose I'll assume you have only 1 script for whole app {{app_name}}

1 alternative

add function to object "this"

function somefunction(param) {}
->
this.somefunction = function(param) {}

then you have to name that object to be available - you will do it add param "standalone with name" like others advised

so if you use "watchify" with "browserify" use this

var b = browserify({
    ...
    standalone: '{{app_name}}'
});

or command line

browserify index.js --standalone {{app_name}} > index-bundle.js

then you can call your function from browser

app_name.somefunction(param);
window.app_name.somefunction(param);

2 alternative

add function to object "window"

function somefunction(param) {}
->
window.somefunction = function(param) {}

then you can call your function from browser

somefunction(param);
window.somefunction(param);

--

maybe I help someone

-1

For debugging purposes I added this line to my code.js:

window.e = function(data) {eval(data);};

Then I could run anything even outside the bundle.

e("anything();");
  • This solution was already covered by thejh's answer. – Galen Long May 5 '18 at 19:26
-1
window.LogData =function(data){
   return unique(data);
};

Call the function simply by LogData(data)

This is just a slight modification to thejh's answer but important one

  • This modification is irrelevant to the question asker's concerns and doesn't add any new information given the already existing answers. – Galen Long May 5 '18 at 19:23

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