241

I am using http://www.codeproject.com/KB/IP/Facebook_API.aspx

I am trying to call the XAML which is created using WPF. But it gives me an error:

The calling thread must be STA, because many UI components require this.

I don't know what to do. I am trying to do this:

FacebookApplication.FacebookFriendsList ffl = new FacebookFriendsList();

But it is giving me that error.

I added a background worker:

static BackgroundWorker bw = new BackgroundWorker();

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    bw.DoWork += bw_DoWork;
    bw.RunWorkerAsync("Message to worker");
    Console.ReadLine();
}

static void bw_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
    // This is called on the worker thread
    FacebookApplication.FacebookFriendsList ffl = new FacebookFriendsList();

    Console.WriteLine(e.Argument);        // Writes "Message to worker"

    // Perform time-consuming task...
}

10 Answers 10

326

Try to invoke your code from the dispatcher:

Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke((Action)delegate{
      // your code
});
4
  • 23
    This is the real answer. You can hack away at WPF's window stupidity with this.
    – Andrew
    Commented May 14, 2016 at 5:17
  • 9
    And similar to this, if you happen to be using MVVMLight you can use DispatcherHelper.CheckBeginInvokeOnUI(Action action)
    – TimothyP
    Commented May 17, 2016 at 7:35
  • 8
    @Andrew It is not stupidity, you're simply trying to access to UI thread from a background thread.
    – Krusty
    Commented Jan 24, 2019 at 16:07
  • If you have background sound playing or UI animation going, will STA threads actually not interfere? Seems odd the OP wanted a background thread (which defaults to MTA) but an STA is acceptable...
    – DAG
    Commented Apr 29, 2020 at 11:17
163

If you make the call from the main thread, you must add the STAThread attribute to the Main method, as stated in the previous answer.

If you use a separate thread, it needs to be in a STA (single-threaded apartment), which is not the case for background worker threads. You have to create the thread yourself, like this:

Thread t = new Thread(ThreadProc);
t.SetApartmentState(ApartmentState.STA);

t.Start();

with ThreadProc being a delegate of type ThreadStart.

3
  • 2
    can this (using STA) possible have side effect?
    – Louis Rhys
    Commented Feb 1, 2012 at 8:00
  • 13
    The main side-effect of being STA is that simultaneous COM callbacks are serialized. If you are not using COM callbacks, it shouldn't matter.
    – Timores
    Commented Feb 2, 2012 at 12:23
  • Saved my life! Was able to use this in a WPF app that hosted a local API for an integration between two different apps!
    – schizoid04
    Commented Oct 6, 2019 at 23:20
31

You can also try this

// create a thread  
Thread newWindowThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(() =>  
{  
    // create and show the window
    FaxImageLoad obj = new FaxImageLoad(destination);  
    obj.Show();  
    
    // start the Dispatcher processing  
    System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.Run();  
}));  

// set the apartment state  
newWindowThread.SetApartmentState(ApartmentState.STA);  

// make the thread a background thread  
newWindowThread.IsBackground = true;  

// start the thread  
newWindowThread.Start();  
3
  • 1
    Thanks. This will help when using Applicationcontext class instead of Form. Commented Oct 23, 2019 at 5:55
  • I am opening a new form when a button is clicked like I do in numerous other places. Any idea why only one of those places is throwing this error? Commented Mar 20, 2020 at 11:35
  • 1
    Thanks, this worked well for my particular use case!
    – Neitherman
    Commented Sep 3, 2020 at 19:41
21

I suspect that you are getting a callback to a UI component from a background thread. I recommend that you make that call using a BackgroundWorker as this is UI thread aware.

For the BackgroundWorker, the main program should be marked as [STAThread].

2
  • 3
    I tried adding it, as above, but it still gives me the error :/
    – C..
    Commented Feb 24, 2010 at 22:24
  • 1
    I'm not familliar with the code. Can you debug through and find out exactly the line of code causing this? Commented Feb 24, 2010 at 22:42
14

Just mark your program Main method with the [STAThread] attribute and the error goes away! it's magic :)

Example:

class Program {
    [STAThread]
    static void Main(string[] args) {
    // My code here
    }
}
1
  • 1
    I've noticed that using the [STAThread] tag doesn't appear to work in an async context, and what made the difference for me was changing the calling method to have the STAThread tag and also be non async
    – Jack
    Commented Aug 30, 2020 at 22:00
5

In my case, I wanted to launch a WPF window from a console app. Simply setting the Main method with [STAThread] didn't work.

A combination of Timores' and Mohammad's answer worked for me:

private static void StaThreadWrapper(Action action)
{
    var t = new Thread(o =>
    {
        action();
        System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.Run();
    });
    t.SetApartmentState(ApartmentState.STA);
    t.Start();
}

Example usage:

StaThreadWrapper(() =>
{
    var mainWindow = new MainWindow();
    mainWindow.Show();
});
2
  • 1
    how is this not the answer? Thanks Commented May 19, 2022 at 23:52
  • I called App.Run() from the callback, and Dispatcher.Run() gave me an exception because the Dispatcher was disposed during action() when I closed the window. I now have var t = new Thread(o => action()); and .Net gives no complaints.
    – Grault
    Commented Jul 13, 2022 at 14:25
3

If the Application.Current is null for example by unit test, you can try this:

 System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher.Invoke( YOUR action )
2

For me, this error occurred because of a null parameter being passed. Checking the variable values fixed my issue without having to change the code. I used BackgroundWorker.

0

Another situation if you may meet, choosing which Window to new and show.
Don't make the choice in App.xaml.cs' App() or OnStartup(), instead, make the choice in Startup event.

// App.xaml.cs
        private App()
        {
            Window window = CheckSession() ? new InstallWindow() : (Window)new LoginWindow();
            window.Show(); // bad 1
        }

        protected override void OnStartup(StartupEventArgs e)
        {
            Window window = CheckSession() ? new InstallWindow() : (Window)new LoginWindow();
            window.Show(); // bad 2

            base.OnStartup(e);
        }

Below should be good

// App.xaml.cs
        private App()
        {
            Startup += Application_Startup;
        }

        private void Application_Startup(object sender, StartupEventArgs e)
        {
            Window window = CheckSession() ? new InstallWindow() : (Window)new LoginWindow();
            window.Show();  // good
        }

Also remember to remove the StartupUri from App.xaml

<!--App.xaml-->
<Application StartupUri="MainWindow">
<!--remove StartupUri-->
</Application>

OR add the event here is OK too.

<!--App.xaml-->
<Application Startup="Application_Startup">

</Application>
// App.xaml.cs
        private App()
        {
            
        }

        private void Application_Startup(object sender, StartupEventArgs e)
        {
            Window window = CheckSession() ? new InstallWindow() : (Window)new LoginWindow();
            window.Show();  // good
        }
-1

If you call a new window UI statement in an existing thread, it throws an error. Instead of that create a new thread inside the main thread and write the window UI statement in the new child thread.

1

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