2

I'm doing Learn Python the Hard Way exercise 35. Below is the original code, and we're asked to change it so it can accept numbers that don't have just 0 and 1 in them.

def gold_room():
    print "This room is full of gold. How much do you take?"

    next = raw_input("> ")

    if "0" in next or "1" in next:
        how_much = int(next)

    else:
        dead("Man, learn to type a number.")

    if how_much < 50:
        print "Nice, you're not greedy, you win!"
        exit(0)

    else:
        dead("You greedy bastard!")

This is my solution, which runs fine and recognizes float values:

def gold_room():
    print "This room is full of gold. What percent of it do you take?"

    next = raw_input("> ")

    try:
        how_much = float(next)
    except ValueError:
        print "Man, learn to type a number."
        gold_room()

    if how_much <= 50:
        print "Nice, you're not greedy, you win!"
        exit(0)

    else:
        dead("You greedy bastard!")

Searching through similar questions, I found some answers that helped me write another solution, shown in the below code. The problem is, using isdigit() doesn't let the user put in a float value. So if the user said they want to take 50.5%, it would tell them to learn how to type a number. It works otherwise for integers. How can I get around this?

def gold_room():
    print "This room is full of gold. What percent of it do you take?"

    next = raw_input("> ")

while True:
    if next.isdigit():
        how_much = float(next)

        if how_much <= 50:
            print "Nice, you're not greedy, you win!"
            exit(0)

        else:
            dead("You greedy bastard!")

    else: 
        print "Man, learn to type a number."
        gold_room()
  • 3
    Do not use next as a variable name. That is a function in Python. – dawg Apr 25 '14 at 22:20
2

isinstance(next, (float, int)) will do the trick simply if next is already converted from a string. It isn't in this case. As such you would have to use re to do the conversion if you want to avoid using try..except.

I would recommend using the try..except block that you had before instead of a if..else block, but putting more of the code inside, as shown below.

def gold_room():
    while True:
        print "This room is full of gold. What percent of it do you take?"
        try:
            how_much = float(raw_input("> "))

            if how_much <= 50:
                print "Nice, you're not greedy, you win!"
                exit(0)

            else:
                dead("You greedy bastard!")

        except ValueError: 
            print "Man, learn to type a number."

This will try to cast it as a float and if it fails will raise a ValueError that will be caught. To learn more, see the Python Tutorial on it.

  • I tried this code and it worked well. Thank you. It is a good solution, but since he hasn't yet introduced try/except statements, I think the answer provided by Slick is more along the lines of what the author was looking for. – pez Apr 25 '14 at 22:40
  • @pez Slick uses as try except as well – cdhagmann Apr 25 '14 at 22:42
  • Oops, sorry. I got mixed up looking at something else. Yes, then both your codes are appropriate and efficient. – pez Apr 25 '14 at 22:45
1

RE would be a good choice

>>> re.match("^\d+.\d+$","10")
>>> re.match("^\d+.\d+$","1.00001")
<_sre.SRE_Match object at 0x0000000002C56370>

If the raw input is a float number, it will return an object. Otherwise, it will return None. In case you need to recognize the int, you could:

>>> re.match("^[1-9]\d*$","10")
<_sre.SRE_Match object at 0x0000000002C56308>
1

You can use a regex to validate the format:

r'^[\d]{2}\.[\d]+$'

You can found the documentation here: https://docs.python.org/2/library/re.html

1

The problem I have with your approach is that you're going down a path of "Look Before You Leap" instead of the more Pythonic "Easier to Ask Forgiveness than Permission" path. I think your original solution is better than trying to validate the input in this way.

Here is how I would write it.

GREEDY_LIMIT = 50

def gold_room():
    print("This room is full of gold. What percent of it do you take?")

    try:
        how_much = float(raw_input("> "))
    except ValueError:
        print("Man, learn to type a number.")
        gold_room()
        return

    if how_much <= GREEDY_LIMIT:
        print "Nice, you're not greedy, you win!"
        exit(0)

    else:
        dead("You greedy bastard!")
  • Your code is simple and efficient, and it worked well. Thank you. I like this answer best so far, because it doesn't use any concepts that I haven't learned yet. He has not introduced try/except statements yet, so I feel this answer would be along the lines of what he expects from us. – pez Apr 25 '14 at 22:38
  • @pez If you find an answer useful, it is good habit to express it by upvoting (any number of answers), or finally even accepting an answer (only one). – Jan Vlcinsky Apr 25 '14 at 22:53
  • @ Jan Vlcinsky Thanks for the advice. I can't upvote anything yet because I'm a new user, and that requires a reputation of 15. I'm thinking of which answer to accept since multiple ones are valid. – pez Apr 25 '14 at 22:56
  • This is wrong. When you call gold_room() at the end of the except clause, you are starting a recursive stack of calls that will cause unexpected behavior if this is used and the user inputs a non float value. – dawg Apr 26 '14 at 15:54
0

use below python based regex checking for float strings

import re
a=re.match('((\d+[\.]\d*$)|(\.)\d+$)' ,  '2.3') 
a=re.match('((\d+[\.]\d*$)|(\.)\d+$)' ,  '2.')
a=re.match('((\d+[\.]\d*$)|(\.)\d+$)' ,  '.3')
a=re.match('((\d+[\.]\d*$)|(\.)\d+$)' ,  '2.3sd')
a=re.match('((\d+[\.]\d*$)|(\.)\d+$)' ,  '2.3')

output: !None, !None, !None, None , !None then use this output to do conversions.

  • 1
    why downvote . it best solution among all existing posted solution ? COuld you reason then just downvote! – donald Feb 28 '17 at 6:00

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