13

According to §7.2/5 and §7.2/6 shouldn't the code below print 1 1 instead of 4 4?

#include <iostream>
enum A { a = (char)1, b, c };   //  underlying type is not fixed

int main() {
    std::cout << sizeof(a) << ' ' << sizeof(A) << '\n';
}

Edit

From §7.2/5:

If the underlying type is not fixed, the type of each enumerator is the type of its initializing value:

— If an initializer is specified for an enumerator, the initializing value has the same type as the expression and the constant-expression shall be an integral constant expression (5.19).

  • 1
    Neither clause states that the underlying type must be the smallest possible. – Oliver Charlesworth Apr 27 '14 at 12:41
  • @OliCharlesworth See my Edit above – Wake up Brazil Apr 27 '14 at 12:53
  • I think "Following the closing brace of an enum-specifier, each enumerator has the type of its enumeration." from §7.2/5 also applies to enumerations with non-fixed types. Live example – dyp Apr 27 '14 at 13:00
  • There's a difference between the type of (the initializing value of) an enumerator and the type of the enumeration. The underlying type of the enumeration is large enough to hold the values of all the enumerators. – Kerrek SB Apr 27 '14 at 13:22
20

If you don't explicitly define the underlying type, then compiler is free to choose an integral type which fits the values. To set the underlying type in C++11 you can use this:

enum A : char { a = 1, b, c }; 
       ^^^^^^

Your way will not force the compiler to use char instead if int.

  • 1
    You got it! Great answer(+1) – Wake up Brazil Apr 27 '14 at 13:02
5

This is implementation defined: the fact that all values of an enum fit in, say, a uint8_t does not force the compiler to pick a single-byte representation for the enumeration.

The underlying type of an enumeration is an integral type that can represent all the enumerator values defined in the enumeration. It is implementation-defined which integral type is used as the underlying type for an enumeration except that the underlying type shall not be larger than int unless the value of an enumerator cannot fit in an int or unsigned int. (emphasis added)

In your case it appears that the compiler implementers choose an int, which takes four bytes on your platform - a perfectly valid choice.

4

No. It has been the case ever since ANSI C that conforming compilers often use int to store enums, even when all the values are small.

Before you say this is insane and it should use the smallest type that works (which by the way GCC will do if you use __attribute__((packed))), think about ABI compatibility. If you release a library which uses an enum type, you would prefer that the size of that type not change. If all enums start life with 4 bytes, the likelihood is increased that simply relinking against an updated library will work.

  • 1
    I wish language designers would allow programmers to specify types in terms of requirements. If a type needs to hold values 0-50,000 and must be stored compactly, but wrapping behavior doesn't matter, on many processors it would be best for it to be a uint16_t when stored in memory memory but a uint32_t when kept in a register. If something is needed which wraps mod 4,294,967,296 then it should wrap mod 4,294,967,296 regardless of the machine's native word size. The better a language lets a programmer specify requirements, the fewer compromises will be needed for various usage cases. – supercat Apr 29 '14 at 13:44
4

The clause you quote, 7.2/5, describes the types of the enumerators. But the enumerators only form part of the definition of the enumeration. The underlying type of the enumeration is large enough to hold the values all enumerators, subject to 7.2/6:

It is implementation-defined which integral type is used as the underlying type except that the underlying type shall not be larger than int unless the value of an enumerator cannot fit in an int or unsigned int.

So it is guaranteed that your underlying type is no larger than int (since int can represent 0, 1 and 2). It is true that the type of your first enumerator is char inside the enum definition, but all actual enum values are of type A. To actually control the underlying type, use the enum-base syntax (e.g. enum A : char), and to query it you can use the std::underlying_type trait.

If you actually would like to see the effect of the enumerator's type in the definition, you can try something like this:

enum Foo { a = '\010', b = sizeof(a) };

std::cout << typeid(b).name() << "\n";    // some variant of "Foo"
std::cout << b << "\n";                   // "1"
std::cout << sizeof(b) << "\n";           // implementation-defined, not greater
                                          // than sizeof(int)
  • "It is true that the type of your first enumerator is char" only until the } of the enum, see my comment to the OP. – dyp Apr 27 '14 at 13:31
  • @dyp: Well, yes, the enumerator isn't something that's available to the program. It's only there as part of the definition of the enum type. – Kerrek SB Apr 27 '14 at 19:16
  • Huh? /11 says "Each enum-name and each unscoped enumerator is declared in the scope that immediately contains the enum-specifier." As far as I can tell, these constants are enumerators, even if you access them after the end of the enumeration declaration. (and later in /11 "An enumerator declared in class scope can be referred to using the class member access operators [...]") – dyp Apr 27 '14 at 19:26
  • @dyp: OK, you're right. I actually found a way to observe the type of the enumerator during definition, see edit. – Kerrek SB Apr 27 '14 at 19:32
  • See my comment to the OP ;) – dyp Apr 27 '14 at 19:36

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