8

I'm working through a book called C Programming: A Modern Approach and in the first section discussing arrays, the author states:

using a macro to define the length of an array is excellent practice

Then uses the brief example:

#define N 10
...
int a[N];

I understand that it has something to do with being able to go back into the source code of the program and change the value, and making it a macro maybe makes it easier for the programmer, but I'm not certain. Why is this an excellent practice, or is it objective?

3 Answers 3

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It's a good practice because

  • the array size obviously has to be hard-coded
  • but it shouldn't have a magic number injected directly into the source code
  • therefore, a macro is a good way to give it a readable name and remove it from the source

That being said I'm not sure I agree this is the best way. An enum also works and avoids some of the problems with macros (e.g. harder to overwrite and silently compile). And IIRC a const int works as well.

For reference this compiles with cc:

const int s = 1;
int a[s];


int main() {
return 0;
}

Apple LLVM version 4.2 (clang-425.0.28) (based on LLVM 3.2svn)
Target: x86_64-apple-darwin12.4.0
Thread model: posix

8
  • Is there any noticeable performance difference (or any other difference) between the value being pulled from the macro or just using an actual integer value?
    – hancsu
    Apr 27, 2014 at 19:01
  • @hancsu there is no difference in runtime between N and 10, becuase there is actually no more N after compiation. N is simple alias for 10
    – Dabo
    Apr 27, 2014 at 19:03
  • Ah, now I see. I was just worried that with the book getting on a bit, age wise, that the best practices then may not be used now. Thanks to both of you for clearing that up.
    – hancsu
    Apr 27, 2014 at 19:05
  • 1
    @hancsu you don't know how macros work. You don't "pull" from a macro. They're precompiled ("PRE"-compiled) directly into your code. That's also why they're so dangerous - they're not any smarter than text substitution. You could write a #define-supporting preprocessor yourself.
    – djechlin
    Apr 27, 2014 at 19:05
  • @hancsu I see your concern, which is why I explained ways that I think are better than using macros. But I at least tried to explain what's good about the approach.
    – djechlin
    Apr 27, 2014 at 19:07
3

It is a very good practice, the C language specification itself says to NEVER bury constants into code, but to define them with meaningful names. There are a few ways to do it, macros (my personal favorite since they use no memory), globals (use memory and can be modified), constant globals (use memory but never change).

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  • spending 4 bytes of memory per program invocation is worth avoiding runtime errors in almost all situations. Your preference for macros speaks of premature optimization.
    – djechlin
    Apr 27, 2014 at 19:13
  • I work in environments with less than a megabyte of memory. That is why it is my preference. The better choices are macros (the C way) or const type (the c++ way).
    – phyrrus9
    Apr 27, 2014 at 19:15
  • The prob is that you can't use a global in an array definition as the size. It must be a compile time constant (unless you use C99). Apr 27, 2014 at 19:18
  • @PeterSchneider it compiled with cc. (clang-425.0.28) (based on LLVM 3.2svn) Target: x86_64-apple-darwin12.4.0 Thread model: posix
    – djechlin
    Apr 27, 2014 at 19:41
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    Sorry, I don't suggest using clang.
    – phyrrus9
    Apr 28, 2014 at 14:28
2

A major reason to use macros instead of a constant integer literal is that when a value is used in multiple places in code, it's much easier to update a single macro value than to go through and find all of a value's uses to update them.

For example, consider the following code:

int a[10];
...
for(i = 0; i < 10; i++) printf("%d\n", a[i]);
...
myFunc(a, 10); // 10 indicates the size of the array

If you decide later on to change the size of the array, you have to go through and find every instance of 10 where it is used to indicate the size. However, if we do this:

#define N 10
int a[N];
...
for(i = 0; i < N; i++) printf("%d\n", a[i]);
...
myFunc(a, N); // N indicates the size of the array

All you have to do is change the value of N to some new number to change the size of the array, and all of your other code will work correctly.

As far as performance, using a macro will be just as fast as hard-coded constant values, since macros are simply a text-based substitution. During compile time, if the macro N has the value 10, then every instance of N in the C source code will be changed to 10 before actually being compiled.

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  • 1
    I know you're just trying to write an example, but those for-loops are dead wrong practice. Should always be for(int i = 0; i < sizeof(a)/sizeof(a[0]); i++) which solves this problem perfectly. (It fails on zero size arrays. Which should be okay.)
    – djechlin
    Apr 27, 2014 at 19:09
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    ...same for myFunc actually. The example you actually want is something like Foo foo[10]; int someFooProperty[10]; where for some reason you need two corresponding arrays.
    – djechlin
    Apr 27, 2014 at 19:11
  • I prefer int a[N]; myFunc(a, sizeof(a)/sizeof(a[0]));, but do use N as in int *a = malloc(N * sizeof(*a)); myFunc(a, N). Apr 27, 2014 at 19:14
  • Using sizeof(a) / sizeof(a[0]) only works in the same context in which the array is created, so if you're doing that on an array passed via a pointer, it's invalid.
    – millinon
    Apr 27, 2014 at 19:20
  • @millinon Is there any alternative? Aside from the original i < N
    – hancsu
    Apr 27, 2014 at 19:25

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