73

When iterating through the returned map in the code, returned by the topic function, the keys are not appearing in order.

How can I get the keys to be in order / sort the map so that the keys are in order and the values correspond?

Here is the code.

121

The Go blog: Go maps in action has an excellent explanation.

When iterating over a map with a range loop, the iteration order is not specified and is not guaranteed to be the same from one iteration to the next. Since Go 1 the runtime randomizes map iteration order, as programmers relied on the stable iteration order of the previous implementation. If you require a stable iteration order you must maintain a separate data structure that specifies that order.

Here's my modified version of example code: http://play.golang.org/p/dvqcGPYy3-

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "sort"
)

func main() {
    // To create a map as input
    m := make(map[int]string)
    m[1] = "a"
    m[2] = "c"
    m[0] = "b"

    // To store the keys in slice in sorted order
    var keys []int
    for k := range m {
        keys = append(keys, k)
    }
    sort.Ints(keys)

    // To perform the opertion you want
    for _, k := range keys {
        fmt.Println("Key:", k, "Value:", m[k])
    }
}

Output:

Key: 0 Value: b
Key: 1 Value: a
Key: 2 Value: c
  • 27
    This can be improved with keys := make([]int, len(m)) and then insert by index keys[i] = k instead of append – jpillora Sep 9 '14 at 0:42
  • 4
    for k in sorted(dictionary): would be so much easier.. – Piotr Dabkowski Jul 28 '16 at 15:17
  • 2
    @PiotrDabkowski, agreed. Or if golang allowed something like for key, value := range sort.Maps(m) {, right? Is it just me, or does a lot of golang feel hackish and boilerplate? – havoc1 Jul 10 '17 at 19:41
  • 1
    This does feel far too wordy to do what a lot of other languages do as a 1 liner. Maybe I'm just not aware of a library that everyone uses that the core language doesn't support? – csgeek Sep 29 '18 at 2:21
13

According to the Go spec, the order of iteration over a map is undefined, and may vary between runs of the program. In practice, not only is it undefined, it's actually intentionally randomized. This is because it used to be predictable, and the Go language developers didn't want people relying on unspecified behavior, so they intentionally randomized it so that relying on this behavior was impossible.

What you'll have to do, then, is pull the keys into a slice, sort them, and then range over the slice like this:

var m map[keyType]valueType
keys := sliceOfKeys(m) // you'll have to implement this
for _, k := range keys {
    v := m[k]
    // k is the key and v is the value; do your computation here
}
  • wait slices are parts of an array. How do I make a slice of only the keys in the map? – gramme.ninja Apr 28 '14 at 1:04
  • 1
    In Go, the word "slice" refers to a data structure that's essentially analogous to Java arrays. It's just a terminology issue. As for getting the keys, you have to explicitly range over the map and construct a slice as you go like this: play.golang.org/p/ZTni0o19Lr – joshlf Apr 28 '14 at 1:24
  • Ah, okay. Thank you for teaching me. Now, it is printing all even then all odd. play.golang.org/p/K2y3m4Zzqd How can I get it to alternate so that it is in order? – gramme.ninja Apr 28 '14 at 2:20
  • 1
    You'll need to sort the slice you get back (or, alternatively, sort it in mapKeys before returning). You'll want to check out the sort package. – joshlf Apr 28 '14 at 3:58
3

If, like me, you find you want essentially the same sorting code in more than one place, or just want to keep the code complexity down, you can abstract away the sorting itself to a separate function, to which you pass the function that does the actual work you want (which would be different at each call site, of course).

Given a map with key type K and value type V, represented as <K> and <V> below, the common sort function might look something like this Go-code template (which Go version 1 does not support as-is):

/* Go apparently doesn't support/allow 'interface{}' as the value (or
/* key) of a map such that any arbitrary type can be substituted at
/* run time, so several of these nearly-identical functions might be
/* needed for different key/value type combinations. */
func sortedMap<K><T>(m map[<K>]<V>, f func(k <K>, v <V>)) {
    var keys []<K>
    for k, _ := range m {
        keys = append(keys, k)
    }
    sort.Strings(keys)  # or sort.Ints(keys), sort.Sort(...), etc., per <K>
    for _, k := range keys {
        v := m[k]
        f(k, v)
    }
}

Then call it with the input map and a function (taking (k <K>, v <V>) as its input arguments) that is called over the map elements in sorted-key order.

So, a version of the code in the answer posted by Mingu might look like:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "sort"
)

func sortedMapIntString(m map[int]string, f func(k int, v string)) {
    var keys []int
    for k, _ := range m {
        keys = append(keys, k)
    }
    sort.Ints(keys)
    for _, k := range keys {
        f(k, m[k])
    }
}

func main() {
    // Create a map for processing
    m := make(map[int]string)
    m[1] = "a"
    m[2] = "c"
    m[0] = "b"

    sortedMapIntString(m,
        func(k int, v string) { fmt.Println("Key:", k, "Value:", v) })
}

The sortedMapIntString() function can be re-used for any map[int]string (assuming the same sort order is desired), keeping each use to just two lines of code.

Downsides include:

  • It's harder to read for people unaccustomed to using functions as first-class
  • It might be slower (I haven't done performance comparisons)

Other languages have various solutions:

  • If the use of <K> and <V> (to denote types for the key and value) looks a bit familiar, that code template is not terribly unlike C++ templates.
  • Clojure and other languages support sorted maps as fundamental data types.
  • While I don't know of any way Go makes range a first-class type such that it could be substituted with a custom ordered-range (in place of range in the original code), I think some other languages provide iterators that are powerful enough to accomplish the same thing.
  • 1
    It may be worth pointing out, for beginners, that the <K>, <V> syntax is not supported in Go. – justinhj Jan 20 at 19:31
  • 1
    Great suggestion, thanks @justinhj -- edited. – James Craig Burley Jan 21 at 22:24
2

All of the answers here now contain the old behavior of maps. In Go 1.12+, you can just print a map value and it will be sorted by key automatically. This has been added because it allows testing of map values easily.

func main() {
    m := map[int]int{3: 5, 2: 4, 1: 3}
    fmt.Println(m)

    // In Go 1.12+
    // Output: map[1:3 2:4 3:5]

    // Before Go 1.12 (the order was undefined)
    // map[3:5 2:4 1:3]
}

Maps are now printed in key-sorted order to ease testing. The ordering rules are:

  • When applicable, nil compares low
  • ints, floats, and strings order by <
  • NaN compares less than non-NaN floats
  • bool compares false before true
  • Complex compares real, then imaginary
  • Pointers compare by machine address
  • Channel values compare by machine address
  • Structs compare each field in turn
  • Arrays compare each element in turn
  • Interface values compare first by reflect.Type describing the concrete type and then by concrete value as described in the previous rules.

When printing maps, non-reflexive key values like NaN were previously displayed as <nil>. As of this release, the correct values are printed.

Read more here.

  • This only seem to apply to the fmt package and printing. The question asks how to sort a map, not how to print a sorted map? – Tim Feb 15 at 14:00
  • He shared a playground link. In there he just prints a map. – Inanc Gumus Feb 15 at 17:45
0

While most of these answers are correct, I often find a C-style for-loop to be the most simple solution (though only if your keys are a series of ints):

m := make(map[int]string)
m[1] = "a"
m[2] = "c"
m[0] = "b"

for i := 0; i < len(m); i++ {
    fmt.Println("Key:", i, "Value:", m[i])
}

Output:

Key: 0 Value: b
Key: 1 Value: a
Key: 2 Value: c
  • 1
    This only works when the map is a continuous range. 1. If there are numbers skipped, you'll still parse them and the value will be an empty string (""). Any numbers higher than len(m) will remain unprinted. 2. When the range keys are continuous int better use a slice. – Tim Feb 15 at 23:11
0

In reply to James Craig Burley's answer. In order to make a clean and re-usable design, one might choose for a more object oriented approach. This way methods can be safely bound to the types of the specified map. To me this approach feels cleaner and organized.

Example:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "sort"
)

type myIntMap map[int]string

func (m myIntMap) sort() (index []int) {
    for k, _ := range m {
        index = append(index, k)
    }
    sort.Ints(index)
    return
}

func main() {
    m := myIntMap{
        1:  "one",
        11: "eleven",
        3:  "three",
    }
    for _, k := range m.sort() {
        fmt.Println(m[k])
    }
}

Extended playground example with multiple map types.

Important note

In all cases, the map and the sorted slice are decoupled from the moment the for loop over the map range is finished. Meaning that, if the map gets modified after the sorting logic, but before you use it, you can get into trouble. (Not thread / Go routine safe). If there is a change of parallel Map write access, you'll need to use a mutex around the writes and the sorted for loop.

mutex.Lock()
for _, k := range m.sort() {
    fmt.Println(m[k])
}
mutex.Unlock()

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