4

I would like to substitute the NA values by a previous and posterior rows average values. Moreover, when the first or last lines are NA values I would like just the repeat next and before rows, accordingly. My real data have negative and decimals values.

My input:

1.0   NA    1.0
NA    2.0   2.0
3.0   3.0   NA

My expected output:

1.0   2.0   1.0
2.0   2.0   2.0
3.0   3.0   2.0

Cheers!

  • to clarify, the NA in column 1 is replaced by the mean of the two values immediately above and below (1.0 and 3.0) or the mean of the two complete rows above and below (mean(c(1.0, NA, 1.0, 3.0, 3.0, NA))? – flodel Apr 28 '14 at 11:54
  • Yes, is the mean between two values immediately above and below, not the entire collumn! It is your question? Thank you for help. – user3091668 Apr 28 '14 at 12:07
  • 'substitute value with average of previous and next' is called interpolation. And 'repeat last non-NA' is called filling, with carry-forward/backward – smci Apr 15 '15 at 18:07
4

You could also use the na.approx function from the zoo package. Note that this has a slightly different behavior (than the solution by @flodel) when you have two consecutive NA values. For the first and last row you could then use na.locf.

y <- na.approx(x)
y[nrow(y), ] <- na.locf(y[(nrow(y)-1):nrow(y), ])[2, ] 
y[1, ] <- na.locf(y[1:2,], fromLast=TRUE)[1, ] 

EDIT: @Grothendieck pointed out that this was much too complicated. You can combine the entire code above into one line:

na.approx(x, rule=2)
  • Anyway, this takes information in same collumn of NA to replace it, right? Always based in above and below values... What´s is the difference to consecutive values? – user3091668 Apr 28 '14 at 12:24
  • or just: na.approx(x, rule = 2) or na.approx(x, rule = 2, method = "constant") depending on what you want. – G. Grothendieck Apr 28 '14 at 12:29
  • Suppose in one column, you have 1, 2, NA, NA, 5. Then na.approx will give you 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. @flodel's answer will give you 1, 2, 2, 5, 5. Both seem like reasonable answers, just to slightly different questions. – shadow Apr 28 '14 at 12:30
3

All vectorized after turning your data into a matrix (which will also make computation faster):

x <- matrix(c(2, NA, 3, NA, 2, 3, 1, 2, NA), 3, 3)

p <- rbind(tail(x, -1), NA) # a matrix of previous value
n <- rbind(NA, head(x, -1)) # a matrix of next value
m <- matrix(rowMeans(cbind(as.vector(p),
                           as.vector(n)), na.rm = TRUE), nrow(x)) # replacements

ifelse(is.na(x), m, x)
0

Quite simple to solve:

library(imputeTS)
na.interpolation(x)

That's it already.

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