When I try to execute this statement in Oracle SQL Developer 2.1 a dialog box "Enter Substitution Variable" pops up asking for a replacement value for TOBAGO,

update t set country = 'Trinidad and Tobago' where country = 'trinidad & tobago';

How can I avoid this without resorting to chr(38) or u'trinidad \0026 tobago' which both obscure the purpose of the statement?

  • 1
    That's strange, when I attempted to run a query exactly like that in SQL developer 2.1 I did not get the replacement variable window? (And my defines are most certainly set to on) – wasatz Feb 25 '10 at 12:55
  • This question helped me greatly. – Oh Chin Boon Oct 4 '12 at 1:59
up vote 161 down vote accepted

Call this before the query:

set define off;

Alternatively, hacky:

update t set country = 'Trinidad and Tobago' where country = 'trinidad &' || ' tobago';

From Tuning SQL*Plus:

SET DEFINE OFF disables the parsing of commands to replace substitution variables with their values.

  • 9
    What (else) does set define off; do? – Xonatron Mar 16 '12 at 18:54

In SQL*Plus putting SET DEFINE ? at the top of the script will normally solve this. Might work for Oracle SQL Developer as well.

  • 2
    SET DEFINE ? does suppress the variable substitution behaviour in SQL Developer 2.1. As noted by Nick SET DEFINE OFF also works. – Janek Bogucki Feb 25 '10 at 13:03
  • set define works but the DBA wont allow to use it sometimes i dont know why – nikhil sugandh Oct 12 at 18:14

this will work as you asked without CHAR(38):

update t set country = 'Trinidad and Tobago' where country = 'trinidad & '|| 'tobago';

create table table99(col1 varchar(40));
insert into table99 values('Trinidad &' || '  Tobago');
insert into table99 values('Trinidad &' || '  Tobago');
insert into table99 values('Trinidad &' || '  Tobago');
insert into table99 values('Trinidad &' || '  Tobago');
SELECT * FROM table99;

update table99 set col1 = 'Trinidad and Tobago' where col1 = 'Trinidad &'||'  Tobago';
  • My question was how this could be done without using chr(38). – Janek Bogucki Oct 12 at 17:29
  • @JanekBogucki take it it correct now without using CHAR(38) – nikhil sugandh Oct 12 at 18:13
  • i gave you a different answer as you already have green ticked answer but you downvoted – nikhil sugandh Oct 12 at 18:26

set scan off; Above command also works.

  • This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you earn sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. If you have a related but different question, ask a new question referencing this one if it will help provide context. – Rohan Khude Aug 8 '16 at 7:36

I was having some issue around this too. Something was starting up everytime I tried to setup a connection to any DB..

What worked for me was removing any startup script that you might have configured!

i.e. Tools>Preferences...>Database and remove any file path that you have in the text box labeled "Filename for connection startup script"!

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